Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 231-240 out of 393.

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Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
In stickleback fish, dads influence offspring behavior and gene expression
Researchers report that some stickleback fish fathers can have long-term effects on the behavior of their offspring: The most attentive fish dads cause their offspring to behave in a way that makes them less susceptible to predators. These behavioral changes are accompanied by changes in gene expression, the researchers report.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Tropical Storm Phanfone fragmented
The bands of thunderstorms wrapping around Tropical Storm Phanfone in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean appeared fragmented to NASA's TRMM satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E
Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the size difference between the two tropical low pressure areas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Pollution linked to lethal sea turtle tumors
Polluted urban and farm runoff in Hawaii has been linked to lethal tumors in endangered sea turtles. A new Duke University-led study finds that excess nitrogen in the runoff accumulates in algae that the turtles eat and can cause the disease Fibropapillomatosis which is the leading known cause of death in endangered green sea turtles. The disease causes the formation of tumors on the animals' eyes, flippers, and internal organs.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund and a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Shape up quickly -- applies to fish, too!
Fish can live in almost any aquatic environment on Earth, but when the climate changes and temperatures go up many species are pushed to the limit. The amount of time needed to adjust to new conditions could prove critical for how different species cope in the future, reveals a new study from researchers at the University of Gothenburg, published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Erik Sandblom
erik.sandblom@bioenv.gu.se
46-031-786-454-846
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts
Bacteria may have ability to reduce impact of diazepam on UK river environments
Scientists at Plymouth University and the University of Liverpool have identified a reaction pathway which could reduce the potentially harmful impact of diazepam and similar chemicals on the UK's freshwater environment.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Plymouth University leads global study examining wave energy transfer on rocky coastlines
Plymouth University is leading a £340,000 international study analyzing the ability of rocky foreshores to absorb the impact of waves on the world's coastlines.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Grouse moor burning causes widespread environmental changes
Evidence of the environmental effects of moorland burning is published today in the first authoritative scientific study on the subject, with the aim of relieving tensions on both sides of the grouse moor management debate.
Natural Environment Research Council, Yorkshire Water

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Biodiversity in the Mediterranean is threatened by alien species
Humans have introduced nearly a thousand species from other seas into the Mediterranean with very serious impact on its unique flora and fauna, finds new study to be published in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
press@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Smithsonian scientists discover coral's best defender against an army of sea stars
Coral reefs face a suite of perilous threats in today's ocean. From overfishing and pollution to coastal development and climate change, fragile coral ecosystems are disappearing at unprecedented rates. Despite this trend, some species of corals surrounding the island of Moorea in French Polynesia have a natural protector in their tropical environment: coral guard-crabs. New research has helped unravel the complex symbiotic relationship between these crabs and the coral reefs they live in and defend.
University of Florida, BIOCODE Mo'orea Project

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Showing releases 231-240 out of 393.

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