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August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 231-240 out of 310.

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Public Release: 23-May-2014
NASA sees first tropical depression of Eastern Pacific hurricane season
One week after the official start of hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, the first tropical depression was born hundreds of miles southwest of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Two NASA Satellites see System 92b headed north in Bay of Bengal
NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites captured radar and infrared data on developing tropical low pressure area System 92B as it now makes it way north through the Bay of Bengal.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Scientists announce top 10 new species for 2014
An appealing carnivorous mammal, a 12-meter-tall tree that has been hiding in plain sight and a sea anemone that lives under an Antarctic glacier are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's International Institute for Species Exploration as the top 10 species discovered last year.

Contact: Claire B. Dunn
cbdunn@esf.edu
315-470-6650
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Public Release: 21-May-2014
GSA Bulletin
Ka'ena Volcano: First building block for O'ahu discovered
Researcher John Sinton of the University of Hawai'i along with colleagues from the Monterrey Bay Aquarium and the French National Center for Scientific Research have announced the discovery of an ancient Hawaiian volcano. Now located in a region of shallow bathymetry extending about 100 km WNW from Ka'ena Point at the western tip of O'ahu, this volcano, which they have named Ka'ena, would have risen about 1,000 meters above sea level 3.5 million years ago.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-May-2014
Trends in Parasitology
Scientist uncovers links connecting environmental changes with spike in infectious disease
Smithsonian scientist Bert Van Bocxlaer and a team of researchers revealed that anthropogenic changes in Africa's Lake Malaŵi are a driving force behind the increase of urogenital schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease caused by parasitic flatworms. In some villages along Lake Malaŵi, 73 percent of people and up to 94 percent of schoolchildren are infected. The research suggests the spike in infection is linked to an increase in human populations and agricultural activities near Lake Malaŵi.

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 21-May-2014
NASA sees developing tropical cyclone in Bay of Bengal
A tropical low pressure area known as System 92B has been organizing in the Northern Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal and NASA's TRMM satellite has shown strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall in the developing storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-May-2014
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
Dam removal improves shad spawning grounds, may boost survival rate
Research from North Carolina State University finds that dam removal improves spawning grounds for American shad and seems likely to improve survival rates for adult fish, juveniles and eggs -- but for different reasons.
US Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-May-2014
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing
New tide gauge uses GPS signals to measure sea level change
A new way of measuring sea level using satellite navigation system signals, for instance GPS, has been implemented by scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. Sea level and its variation can easily be monitored using existing coastal GPS stations, the scientists have shown.

Contact: Robert Cumming
robert.cumming@chalmers.se
46-704-933-114
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Humpback whale subspecies revealed by genetic study
A new genetic study has revealed that populations of humpback whales in the oceans of the North Pacific, North Atlantic and Southern Hemisphere are much more distinct from each other than previously thought, and should be recognized as separate subspecies. Understanding how connected these populations are has important implications for the recovery of these charismatic animals that were once devastated by hunting.
New Zealand Royal Society, Lenfest Ocean Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rachel Law
raclaw@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21437
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bottom trawling causes deep-sea biological desertification
A study led by scientists from the Polytechnic University of Marche -- Ancona, Italy -- involving researchers from the Institute of Marine Sciences and the Autonomous University of Barcelona, has determined that fishing trawling causes intensive, long-term biological desertification of the sedimentary seabed ecosystems, diminishing their content in organic carbon and threatening their biodiversity.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Showing releases 231-240 out of 310.

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