Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 231-240 out of 393.

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Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Animal functional diversity started out poor, became richer over time
The finding refutes a hypothesis by the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen J. Gould that marine creatures underwent an 'early burst' of functional diversity during the dawn of animal life.

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Geology
Lightning plus volcanic ash makes glass
In their open-access paper for Geology, Kimberly Genareau and colleagues propose, for the first time, a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcanic lightning. The existence of fulgurites -- glassy products formed in rocks and sediments struck by cloud-to-ground lightning -- provide direct evidence that geologic materials can be melted via natural lightning occurrence.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week From AGU: Ionosphere irregularities, Colombian volcanoes, Salish Sea nutrients
Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, in collaboration with the University of New Brunswick in Canada, are studying irregularities in the ionosphere, a part of the atmosphere centered about 350 kilometers (217 miles) above the ground that defines the boundary between Earth and space.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
'No take zones' in English Channel would benefit marine wildlife and the fishing industry
Marine conservationists are increasingly pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs) to save threatened species and reduce over-fishing. However, while most people agree that stopping some types of fishing in MPAs would benefit wildlife and fisheries, working out which fishing activities should be banned is often complicated and controversial.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
The Cryosphere
Combined Arctic ice observations show decades of loss
Historic submarine and modern satellite records show that average ice thickness in the central Arctic Ocean dropped by 65 percent from 1975 to 2012. September ice thickness, when the ice cover is at a minimum, dropped by 85 percent.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting
10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting
Register now for 10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute has assembled a roster of dynamic speakers and workshops for its Annual Meeting, March 23-26, 2015.

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New technique improves forecasts for Canada's prized salmon fishery
A method developed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers for analyzing and predicting nature's dynamic and interconnected systems has improved forecasts of populations of Fraser River Sockeye Salmon, a highly prized fishery in British Columbia.
National Science Foundation, Foundation for the Advancement of Outstanding Scholarship and Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan, NSF NOAA Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem Organization Program

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Mysterious microbes hold big possibilities for Sloan Research Fellow Alyson Santoro
Marine microbiologist Alyson Santoro of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science was recently awarded a prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship to study mysterious single-celled mircroorganisms called archaea. Once thought to live only in extreme environments, they are now known to be among the most abundant organisms on the planet yet still little is known about them.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
UT research: Conservation organizations need to keep up with nature
A new paper authored by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, professor suggests that in order to cope, conservation organizations need to adapt like the organisms they seek to protect. The paper, published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, argues that conservation organizations need to be bolder in their adaptation efforts given the rate and extent of the ecological changes that are coming.

Contact: Amy Blakely
ablakely@utk.edu
865-974-5034
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Journal of Animal Ecology
In hot and cold water: The private lives of 'Hoff' crabs revealed
Researchers at the University of Southampton have shed light on the private life of a new species of deep-sea crab, previously nicknamed the 'Hoff' crab because of its hairy chest.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 231-240 out of 393.

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