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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 231-240 out of 299.

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Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Satellite tracking identifies Atlantic Ocean risk zones for leatherback turtles
The last large populations of the leatherback turtle are at risk because their migratory routes in the Atlantic Ocean clash with the locations of industrial fisheries, a new study shows.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-078-273-09332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 10-Feb-2014
Global Change Biology
Fish living near the equator will not thrive in the warmer oceans of the future
According to an international team of researchers, the rapid pace of climate change is threatening the future presence of fish near the equator. "Our studies found that one species of fish could not even survive in water just three degrees Celsius warmer than what it lives in now," says the lead author of the study, Dr Jodie Rummer from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Jodie Rummer
jodie.rummer@jcu.edu.au
61-074-781-5300
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 10-Feb-2014
Herpetology Notes
University of Tennessee study finds crocodiles climb trees
When most people envision crocodiles, they think of them waddling on the ground or wading in water -- not climbing trees. However, a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study has found that the reptiles can climb trees as far as the crowns.

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 10-Feb-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite eyes rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Fobane
Some towering thunderstorms were spotted in Tropical Cyclone Fobane as NASA's TRMM satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 10. Fobane was formerly Tropical Cyclone 14S and when it strengthened into a tropical storm it was renamed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Feb-2014
AMOS National Conference 2014: Southern Investigations
Nature Climate Change
Pacific trade winds stall global surface warming -- for now
Heat stored in the western Pacific Ocean caused by an unprecedented strengthening of the equatorial trade winds appears to be largely responsible for the hiatus in surface warming observed over the past 13 years.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-418-617-366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
NASA spots fourteenth tropical cyclone of Southern Indian Ocean season
The fourteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season was born as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
NASA spots very heavy rainfall rates in Tropical Cyclone Edilson
Imagine receiving as much as 7 inches of rain in one hour. That's about what NASA's TRMM satellite spotted falling in one area within Tropical Cyclone Edilson as it moved over the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Computer models help decode cells that sense light without seeing
Researchers have found that the melanopsin pigment in the retina is potentially more sensitive to light than its more famous counterpart, rhodopsin, the pigment that allows for night vision. The staff of the Laboratory for Computational Photochemistry and Photobiology at Ohio's Bowling Green State University have leveraged OSC computing and storage systems to study melanopsin, a retina pigment capable of sensing environmental light changes, informing the nervous system and synchronizing it with the day/night rhythm.
Bowling Green State University Center for Photochemical Sciences and the College of Arts & Sciences

Contact: Mr. Jamie Abel
jabel@oh-tech.org
614-292-6495
Ohio Supercomputer Center

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
The biomass of ocean mesopelagic fish is 10 times higher than estimated
An international team, in which AZTI-Tecnalia researchers are participating and which is being led by the doctor in oceanography Xabier Irigoien, has discovered that mesopelagic fish, in other words, ones found at depths of between 200 and 1,000 meters in ocean areas, abundance could be at least 10 times higher than the original estimate. The results have been published in the journal Nature Communications.

Contact: Irati Kortabitarte
i.kortabitarte@elhuyar.com
34-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Fish biomass in the ocean is 10 times higher than estimated
With a stock estimated at 1,000 million tons so far, mesopelagic fish dominate the total biomass of fish in the ocean. However, a team of researchers with the participation of the Spanish National Research Council has found that their abundance could be at least 10 times higher. The results, published in Nature Communications journal, are based on the acoustic observations conducted during the circumnavigation of the Malaspina Expedition.

Contact: Alda Ólafsson
alda.olafsson@csic.es
0034-915-681-499
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Showing releases 231-240 out of 299.

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