Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 236-245 out of 392.

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Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Rachel before losing hurricane status
Tropical Storm Rachel strengthened into a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 27-28, only to weaken back into a tropical storm by Sept. 29. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rachel before it weakened and took a visible picture of the storm off Baja California's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri winding down over open ocean
Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to appear more like a cold front on satellite imagery as it transitions into an extra-tropical storm over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone triggers warnings in Northwestern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone on Sept. 29 and captured a picture of the storm that showed thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the storm's center, and a large band of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the east. Phanfone is now a threat to various islands and warnings are in effect.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Half of global wildlife lost, says new WWF report
Between 1970 and 2010 populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe dropped 52 percent, says the 2014 Living Planet Report released today by World Wildlife Fund (WWF). This biodiversity loss occurs disproportionately in low-income countries -- and correlates with the increasing resource use of high-income countries.

Contact: Brendan Rohr
Brendan.rohr@wwfus.org
202-495-4621
World Wildlife Fund

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Ocean acidification could lead to collapse of coral reefs
Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Carnegie Institute of Science researchers have measured a roughly 40 percent reduction in the rate of calcium carbonate deposited in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in the last 35 years, likely caused by ocean acidification. If the trend continues, it could damage the reef framework and endanger the entire coral ecosystem, with the loss of its magnificent and highly diverse flora and fauna.
Israel Science Foundation, Moore Foundation

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Naturwissenschaften
Dolphins are attracted to magnets
Dolphins are indeed sensitive to magnetic stimuli, as they behave differently when swimming near magnetized objects. So says Dorothee Kremers and her colleagues at Ethos unit of the Université de Rennes in France, in a study in Springer's journal Naturwissenschaften -- The Science of Nature. Their research, conducted in the delphinarium of Planète Sauvage in France, provides experimental behavioral proof that these marine animals are magnetoreceptive.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
2015 DOE JGI's science portfolio delves deeper into the Earth's data mine
In selecting 32 new projects with samples from diverse environments for the 2015 Community Science Program (CSP), the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute shifts 'from solving an organism's genome sequence to enabling an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do.' The total allocation of the CSP 2015 portfolio is expected to exceed 60 trillion bases -- the equivalent of 20,000 human genomes of plant, fungal and microbial genome sequences.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Global Change Biology
Climate change appears a mixed bag for a common frog
After warmer winters, wood frogs breed earlier and produce fewer eggs, a Case Western Reserve University researcher has found. Michael F. Benard also found that frogs produce more eggs during winters with more rain and snow.
University of Michigan, Michigan Society of Fellows, Case Western Reserve University

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Naturwissenschaften
Tooth buried in bone shows prehistoric predators tangled across land, sea
Before dinosaurs, it was thought the top aquatic and terrestrial predators didn't often interact. But researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Tennessee discovered that the smaller of the two apex predators was potentially targeting the larger animal.

Contact: Rosaire Bushey
busheyr@vt.edu
540-231-5035
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Science
Poor fish harvests more frequent now off California coast
In the past 600 years off the California coast, occasional episodes of diminished ocean upwelling that cause fish populations to crash have occurred naturally. The poor yearly fish harvests seen in the last 60 years aren't any worse in severity than earlier, but are happening more frequently.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Showing releases 236-245 out of 392.

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