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Showing releases 236-245 out of 360.

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Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Conservation Physiology
Sheltering habits help sharks cope with acid oceans
Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that the epaulette shark, a species that shelters within reefs and copes with low oxygen levels, is able to tolerate increased carbon dioxide in the water without any obvious physical impact.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Conservation Physiology
Sharks that hide in coral reefs may be safe from acidifying oceans
A study published online today in the journal Conservation Physiology has shown that the epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) displays physiological tolerance to elevated carbon dioxide (CO₂) in its environment after being exposed to CO₂ levels equivalent to those that are predicted for their natural habitats in the near future.
School of Marine and Tropical Biology, School of Earth and Environmental Science, Australian Reseaerch Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Kirsty Doole
kirsty.doole@oup.com
01-865-355-439
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Researchers solve riddle of the rock pools
Research from the University of Exeter has revealed that the rock goby (Gobius paganellus), an unassuming little fish commonly found in rock pools around Britain, southern Europe, and North Africa, is a master of camouflage and can rapidly change color to conceal itself against its background.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover carbonate rocks are unrecognized methane sink
Since the first undersea methane seep was discovered 30 years ago, scientists have meticulously analyzed and measured how microbes in the seafloor sediments consume the greenhouse gas methane. They have now found a type of rock known as authigenic carbonate also contains vast amounts of active microbes that take up methane. This demonstrates that the global methane process is still poorly understood.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite spots Central Pacific's Tropical Storm Ana
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 after it formed in the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA satellite spots Hudhud's remnants
Cyclone Hudhud made landfall in east-central India on Oct. 12 and caused a lot of damage and several fatalities as it moved inland and weakened to a remnant low pressure area. NASA saw those remnants on Oct. 14.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Extra-Tropical Storm Vongfong pulling away from Hokkaido, Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Extra-Tropical Storm Vongfong on Oct. 4 as it was moving away from Hokkaido, Japan, the northernmost of the big islands. Vongfong transitioned into an extra-tropical storm early on Oct. 4 as its core changed from warm to cold.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Gonzalo head toward Bermuda
Tropical Storm Gonzalo intensified into a hurricane late on Monday, Oct. 14 and is expected to become a major hurricane as it moves toward Bermuda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
This week from AGU: Glacier health check, world ocean atlas, liquid brines on Mars
This week from AGU: Glacier health check, world ocean atlas, and liquid brines on Mars.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Avian Biology
A canary for climate change
Researchers find that wing-propelled diving seabirds, as well as their extinct relatives, may have served as an indicator species for environmental changes and faunal shifts. The findings also elucidate how past extinctions have influenced the modern distribution and population size of existing species.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, University of Texas at Austin

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Showing releases 236-245 out of 360.

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