Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 236-245 out of 390.

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Public Release: 14-May-2015
Species in the Spotlight campaign highlights NOAA Fisheries' endangered species conservation efforts
NOAA Fisheries announced today a new Species in the Spotlight campaign to focus recovery and public education efforts on eight marine species that are at risk of extinction.

Contact: Kate Brogan
katherine.brogan@noaa.gov
301-427-8030
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Nature Reviews Microbiology
Further assessment needed of dispersants used in response to oil spills
New commentary in Nature Reviews Microbiology by Samantha Joye of the University of Georgia and her colleagues argues for further in-depth assessments of the impacts of dispersants on microorganisms to guide their use in response to future oil spills.

Contact: Samantha Joye
mjoye@uga.edu
706-542-5893
University of Georgia

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Science
Revealing the ocean's hidden fertilizer
Phosphorus is one of the most common substances on Earth. An essential nutrient for every living organism -- humans require approximately 700 milligrams per day -- we are rarely concerned about consuming enough of it because it is present in most of the foods we eat. Despite its ubiquity and living organisms' utter dependence on it, we know surprisingly little about how it moves, or cycles, through the ocean environment.
National Science Foundation, Simons Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Science
New research reveals first warm-blooded fish
New research by NOAA Fisheries has revealed the opah, or moonfish, as the first fully warm-blooded fish that circulates heated blood throughout its body much like mammals and birds, giving it a competitive advantage in the cold ocean depths.

Contact: Jim Milbury
jim.milbury@noaa.gov
562-980-4006
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 13-May-2015
NOAA Fisheries and partners winners of Presidential Migratory Bird Stewardship Award
NOAA Fisheries staff Tom Good (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) and Steve Copps (West Coast Region), together with our partners at Washington Sea Grant and Oregon State University, were recently awarded the 2015 Presidential Migratory Bird Stewardship Award. The award recognizes the team's role in a project to prevent migratory seabird mortality in the US West Coast Groundfish longline fishery.

Contact: Vicky Krikelas
Vicky.Krikelas@noaa.gov
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 13-May-2015
GPM, AIRS, and RapidScat view Typhoon Dolphin headed for Guam
Typhoon Dolphin (strengthened overnight on 5/12 from Tropical Storm status) formed south of Pohnpei in the western Pacific Ocean on May 7, 2015. Dolphin's power has oscillated from a weak tropical depression to typhoon intensity over the past five days. Dolphin is now an intensifying typhoon headed westward.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Nature
Study reveals how rivers regulate global carbon cycle
River transport of carbon to the ocean is not on a scale that will solve our CO2 problem, but we haven't known how much carbon the world's rivers routinely flush into the ocean, until now. A study by WHOI scientists calculated the first direct estimate of how much and in what form organic carbon is exported by rivers. The estimate will help modelers predict how this export may shift as Earth's climate changes.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Dedicated scientists and volunteers working to better understand now rare abalone species
David Witting, a NOAA Fisheries biologist, has been working to restore abalone populations for over a decade. Bill Hagey, a developer of underwater instruments used by marine scientists, started working with the pioneer of abalone research, Dr. David Leighton, when he was in high school. Witting and Hagey began diving together for abalone a few years ago. Then, within a short time, their venture turned into a Citizen Science Group taking action to contribute new information to our understanding of southern California abalone populations.

Contact: Megan Morlock
Megan.Morlock@noaa.gov
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Ex-Super Typhoon Noul's final warning issued by Joint Typhoon Warning Center
Noul is expected to be near Tokyo Tuesday night with strong winds and heavy rain. Currently Noul is located 412 miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, and is moving northeast at 51 knots.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-May-2015
All NASA eyes on Tropical Storm Dolphin
Three NASA satellite instruments took aim at Tropical Storm Dolphin. Dolphin responded by posing for pictures as it headed west towards Guam gathering strength and speed as it moves.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 236-245 out of 390.

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