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Video:Archerfish hunt by shooting jets of water at potential prey, and a Current Biology paper finds that they might be even better shots than we thought. See the video here and read about the research on EurekAlert!.
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September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruña, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 241-250 out of 410.

<< < 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 > >>

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nature's tiny engineers
Corals control their environment, stirring up water eddies to bring nutrients.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate
A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 cm more than the global average of 6 cm.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Cristobal racing through North Atlantic
Satellite imagery shows Hurricane Cristobal racing through the North Atlantic on Friday, August 29 while losing its tropical characteristics.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down
NOAA's GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA's GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane Marie.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Managing coasts under threat from climate change and sea-level rise
Coastal regions under threat from climate change and sea-level rise need to tackle the more immediate threats of human-led and other non-climatic changes, according to a team of international scientists.

Contact: Becky Attwood
r.attwood@soton.ac.uk
University of Southampton

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Ready for mating at the right time
Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists at the Marine Science Center at the University of the Algarve in Faro, Portugal, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia: this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females.
Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal, Max Planck Society

Contact: Dr. Bernd Schneider
schneider@ice.mpg.de
49-364-157-1600
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
GSA Bulletin
Snails tell of the rise and fall of the Tibetan Plateau
The rise of the Tibetan plateau -- the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth -- is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics. In this study published in GSA Bulletin, Katharine Huntington and colleagues employ a cutting-edge geochemical tool -- 'clumped' isotope thermometry -- using modern and fossil snail shells to investigate the uplift history of the Zhada basin in southwestern Tibet.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Not all phytoplankton in the ocean need to take their vitamins
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), researchers have discovered.
National Center for Genome Resources, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Packard Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Storm Marie
When NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of what is now Tropical Storm Marie, weakened from hurricane status on Aug. 28, the strongest thunderstorms were located in the southern quadrant of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ecology Letters
Study finds marine protected areas inadequate for protecting fish and ocean ecology
A new study reports that an expansion of marine protected areas is needed to protect fish species that perform key ecological functions. According to investigators from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations, previous efforts at protecting fish have focused on saving the largest numbers of species, often at the expense of those species that provide key and difficult-to-replace ecological functions.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Showing releases 241-250 out of 410.

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