Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 241-250 out of 486.

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Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Dolores weakening
Hurricane Dolores weakened to a tropical storm early on July 17 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and gathered infrared information about the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Tropical storm Enrique re-classified as a Tropical Storm
Although it appeared that Tropical Storm Enrique had weakened to a tropical depression, satellite data revealed that there was still some punch left in the system and it was re-classified a tropical storm on July 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Centuries-old shipwreck discovered off North Carolina coast
Researchers have discovered a centuries-old shipwreck off the coast of North Carolina. Artifacts around the wreck, including bricks, bottles and navigation gear, appear to date it to the late 18th or early 19th century. Scientists from Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of Oregon and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution were on an NSF-funded expedition using sonar scanning technology and the submersible vessel Alvin.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
ZooKeys
A fish too deep for science
Scientists from the Smithsonian Institution describe a new goby fish species that lives deeper than its closest relatives and had gone unnoticed up until now. It has been discovered between 70 and 80 m in the southern Caribbean as part of the institution's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP). The species was named in recognition of the Curasub submersible used in the exploration. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Carole Baldwin
baldwinc@si.edu
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
Summertime plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead.
NASA, US Department of Energy, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Scientific Reports
Carbon dioxide pools discovered in Aegean Sea
The location of the second largest volcanic eruption in human history, the waters off Greece's Santorini are the site of newly discovered opalescent pools forming at 250 meters depth. The interconnected series of meandering, iridescent white pools contain high concentrations of carbon dioxide and may hold answers to questions related to deep-sea carbon storage as well as provide a means of monitoring the volcano for future eruptions.
EU Eurofleets Program, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, National Science Foundation, NASA's Astrobiology Program

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Science
Oceans slowed global temperature rise, scientists report
A new study of ocean temperature measurements shows that in recent years, extra heat from greenhouse gases has been trapped in the subsurface waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans, thus accounting for the slowdown in the global surface temperature increase observed during the past decade, researchers say.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Nangka knocking on Japan's door
Typhoon Nangka was knocking on Japan's door when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on July 16. Satellite imagery showed that Nangka's northern quadrant began spreading over southeastern Japan. The GPM core satellite spotted towering thunderstorms in Nangka's western side.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees Tropical Storm Halola's concentrated winds
The strongest sustained winds in the northwestern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Halola were located in the northeastern quadrant of the storm according to NASA's RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
NASA spots Hurricane Dolores over Socorro Island
Hurricane Dolores moved over Socorro Island on July 15 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. On July 16, the island was still feeling the effects of Dolores.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 241-250 out of 486.

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