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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 246-255 out of 391.

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Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Water fleas genetically adapt to climate change
The water flea has genetically adapted to climate change. Biologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, compared 'resurrected' water fleas -- hatched from 40-year-old eggs -- with more recent specimens. The project was coordinated by Professor Luc De Meester from the Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology, Evolution and Conservation.
Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology, KU Leuven Centre of Excellence on Eco- and Socio-evolutionary Dynamics

Contact: Katrien Bollen
news@kuleuven.be
KU Leuven

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Did ocean acidification cause marine mollusc extinction?
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has questioned the role played by ocean acidification, produced by the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs, in the extinction of ammonites and other planktonic calcifiers 66 million years ago.
European Project on Ocean Acidification, Natural Environment Research Council, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of Energy and Climate Change, UK Ocean Acidification Program

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Solution to corrosive ocean mystery reveals future climate
Researchers have discovered how an abrupt global warming event triggered a highly corrosive deep-water current to flow through the North Atlantic Ocean 55 million years ago solving a mystery that has puzzled scientists for a decade. The findings published in Nature Geoscience today may also help determine how sensitive our climate was to CO2 in the past.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 9-May-2015
Ana tightens up and becomes tropical
Up until Saturday morning, Ana had been referred to as a subtropical storm, rather than a tropical storm. As of Saturday morning she made the transition to a full tropical storm overnight as the storm tightened up and became more organized with most of the shower and thunderstorm activity becoming centered within Ana.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
PLOS ONE
New tool helps researchers, managers plan for sea scallop fishery in the future
Sea scallops, one of the most valuable commercial fisheries in the United States, are a well managed and monitored fishery, yet little is known about how changing ocean temperatures and ocean chemistry and other environmental factors could impact the fishery. A study in PLOS ONE describes a new computer model to help inform scallop management discussions and decisions in the coming decades.
NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program through the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science's Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research, Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Tropical Depression 07W expected to intensify to typhoon
Forecasters expect Tropical Depression 07W which is riding behind Typhoon Noul to intensify to typhoon strength within the next five days.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Noul's impending landfall raises warning #2 in Luzon
The Philippines warning center has raised a #2 warning for its citizens in the Luzon province of Catanduanes.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
GPM and Suomi-NPP fly above subtropical storm Ana
During the past few days subtropical storm ANA was developing off the southeastern coast of the United States.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Stan Yavno receives Arnold Berliner Award 2015
The Arnold Berliner Award 2015 has been presented to Stan Yavno from Tel Aviv University and the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel. He receives the award for his research on the phenotypic plasticity of native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish, published in Springer's flagship multidisciplinary science journal, The Science of Nature.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Nature Communications
Environmental exposure to hormones used in animal agriculture greater than expected
Research by an Indiana University environmental scientist and colleagues at universities in Iowa and Washington finds that potentially harmful growth-promoting hormones used in beef production are expected to persist in the environment at higher concentrations and for longer durations than previously thought.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Showing releases 246-255 out of 391.

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