Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 246-255 out of 437.

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Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Oceanography
New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species
New research by NOAA, University of Alaska, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the journal Oceanography shows that surface waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas could reach levels of acidity that threaten the ability of animals to build and maintain their shells by 2030, with the Bering Sea reaching this level of acidity by 2044.

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
301-734-1123
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Palaeontology
Research reveals insights on how ancient reptiles adapted to life in water
The world's first study into the brain anatomy of a marine reptile that lived at the same time as the dinosaurs sheds light on how the reptilian brain adapted to life in the oceans.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Journal of Zoology
How an animal's biochemistry may support aggressive behavior
Researchers who paired Siamese fighting fish in mock fights found that winning fish could supply more energy to their muscles during fights than losing fish.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Satellite animation shows System 91L developing in the Gulf of Mexico
The National Hurricane Center is keeping a close eye on a developing tropical low pressure area in the south-central Gulf of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided imagery of the system, and an animation was created at NASA showing the development over two days. The system has a high chance for development into a tropical depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Carlos hugging Mexico's west coast
Tropical Storm Carlos approached the southwestern coast of Mexico over the past weekend of June 13-14, and satellite imagery shows the storm continues to hug the coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
What fish ears can tell us about sex, surveillance and sustainability
Scientists at the University of Southampton have found a way to pry into the private lives of fish -- by looking in their ears.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
ChemSusChem
A new method of converting algal oil to transportation fuels
A new method of converting squalene, which is produced by microalgae, to gasoline or jet fuel, has been developed. This study is part of a research project titled 'Next-generation energies for Tohoku recovery. Task 2: R&D on using algae biofuels.' The project attempts to make use of oil-producing algae in wastewater treatment. The result will help to expand the utilization of oil that is produced from wastewater.
Next-generation Energies for Tohoku Recovery

Contact: Keiichi Tomishige
tomi@erec.che.tohoku.ac.jp
81-227-957-214
Tohoku University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
View of 'nature as capital' uses economic value to help achieve a sustainable future
Researchers today outlined in a series of reports how governments, organizations and corporations are successfully moving away from short-term exploitation of the natural world and embracing a long-term vision of 'nature as capital' -- the ultimate world bank upon which the health and prosperity of both the human race and the planet depend. The number of success stories is increasing.

Contact: Jane Lubchenco
Lubchenco@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5337
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Genetic switch lets marine diatoms do less work at higher CO2
Rising CO2 lets diatoms return to their evolutionary roots, by skipping steps that concentrate CO2. Over time, the drifting algae adjust by slowing down their metabolism.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Toothed whales have survived millions of years without key antiviral proteins
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have determined that toothed whales lack functional Mx genes -- a surprising discovery, since all 56 other sequenced mammals in the study possess these genes to fight off viruses like HIV, measles and flu.
Stanford Center for Computational, Evolutionary and Human Genomics, Stanford School of Medicine, PhRMA Foundation, Microsoft

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Showing releases 246-255 out of 437.

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