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Blub blub blub Marine protected areas are a crucial part of preserving biodiversity. Track and analyze them by country and location with MPAtlas. This resource is provided by the Marine Conservation Institute.
Crabs Dolphin Fish Fish Seal Shark Squid Research Submarine Vent Seal and Orca

Video: A juvenile whale shark cruises over the shallow reef shelf of the South Ari Marine Protected Area. At 42km2 S.A.MPA is the largest Marine Protected Area in the Maldives and one of the few places in the world where whale sharks can be encountered all year round. See the video, from The Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruņa, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 246-255 out of 362.

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Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
Blood donations could help reduce the risk of heart disease in shift workers
Austrian researchers have found that jetlag has severe effects on red blood cells, possibly explaining the high incidence of heart disease seen in shift workers. However, these effects can be counterbalanced by fresh, young red blood cells -- making blood donations a potential therapy for shift workers.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Behind a marine creature's bright green fluorescent glow
Probing the mysterious glow of light produced naturally by animals, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have deciphered the structural components related to fluorescence brightness in the primitive sea creature known as amphioxus. The study carries implications for a variety of industries looking to maximize brightness of natural fluorescence, including applications in biotechnology such as adapting fluorescence for biomedical protein tracers and tracking gene expression in the human body.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Marine Biology
A case study of manta rays and lagoons
Doug McCauley chose one of the most isolated places in the world, Palmyra Atoll, to study the ecology of the Manta alfredi.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tags reveal Chilean devil rays are among ocean's deepest divers
Thought to dwell mostly near the ocean's surface, Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) are most often seen gliding through shallow, warm waters. But a new study by scientists at WHOI and international colleagues reveals that these large and majestic creatures are actually among the deepest-diving ocean animals.
National Science Foundation, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Harrison Foundation, Portuguese Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
Scientists uncover the key to adaptation limits of ocean dwellers
The simpler a marine organism is structured, the better it is suited for survival during climate change. Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, discovered this in a new meta-study, which appears today in the research journal Global Change Biology.

Contact: Kristina Baer
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12139
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
New spawning reefs to boost native fish in St. Clair River
Construction of two new fish-spawning reefs is about to begin in the St. Clair River northeast of Detroit, the latest chapter in a decade-plus effort to restore native species such as lake sturgeon, walleye and lake whitefish.
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
Smarter than you think: Fish can remember where they were fed 12 days later
It is popularly believed that fish have a memory span of only 30 seconds. Canadian scientists, however, have demonstrated that this is far from true -- in fact, fish can remember context and associations up to 12 days later.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Geology
New study: Ancient Arctic sharks tolerated brackish water 50 million years ago
Sharks were a tolerant bunch some 50 million years ago, cruising an Arctic Ocean that contained about the same percentage of freshwater as Louisiana's Lake Ponchatrain does today, says a new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jaelyn Eberle
jaelyn.eberle@colorado.edu
303-919-6914
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
All the world's oceans have plastic debris on their surface
The Malaspina Expedition, led by the Spanish National Research Council, have demonstrated that there are five large accumulations of plastic debris in the open ocean that match with the five major twists of oceanic surface water circulation. In addition to the known accumulation of plastic waste in the North Pacific, there are similar accumulations in the central North Atlantic, the South Pacific, the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean.

Contact: Marta García Gonzalo
marta.garcia@csic.es
34-915-681-476
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
It's a girl! Gene silencing technology alters sex of prawns
Israeli scientists have developed a novel method for generating single-sex populations of prawns. This could be used to boost the productivity of aquaculture farms and even as a biocontrol measure against invasive species and pests.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
Society for Experimental Biology

Showing releases 246-255 out of 362.

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