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Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video:Using state-of-the-art GPS-linked satellite tags, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Large Pelagic Research Center are tracking the complex migration habits of leatherback sea turtles. See them in action here and read about their efforts on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 246-255 out of 382.

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Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Seafloor volcano pulses may alter climate
A new study shows that undersea volcanoes flare up on strikingly regular cycles, ranging from two weeks to 100,000 years -- and, that they erupt almost exclusively during the first six months of each year. The pulses -- apparently tied to short- and long-term changes in earth's orbit, and to sea levels -- may help trigger natural climate swings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Genetics lab unravels mystery killing at sea
NOAA Fisheries scientists happened onto a killer whale attack too late to tell what species had been the target. So they recovered all that was left -- a whale lung -- and probed its DNA to for clues to where it came from. It turned out to be the first documentation of killer whales attacking a rarely seen pygmy sperm whale.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Geochemical Perspectives Letters
15-million-year-old mollusk protein found
A team of Carnegie scientists have found 'beautifully preserved' 15-million-year-old thin protein sheets in fossil shells from southern Maryland. The team collected samples from Calvert Cliffs, along the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay, a popular fossil collecting area. They found fossilized shells of a snail-like mollusk called Ecphora that lived in the mid-Miocene era.

Contact: Robert Hazen
rhazen@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
UM School of Communication to create open educational resource on ocean health
The University of Miami's Department of Cinema and Interactive Media at the School of Communication has received a two-year grant of over $405,000 from the Friends of Stark Parks and the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation, for the creation of a unique Open Educational Resource that will not only explain the science underlying ocean health management, but also help bring the specific work of top researchers from their worldwide field locations to university curricula.
Friends of the Stark Parks, The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation

Contact: Barbara Gutierrez
bgutierrez@miami.edu
305-284-3205
University of Miami

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Nature
Evidence from warm past confirms recent IPCC estimates of climate sensitivity
New evidence showing the level of atmospheric CO2 millions of years ago supports recent climate change predictions from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Pacific wind patterns, Ethiopia's sedimentary record, US air quality
Unusual weather that contributed to the California drought also led to an unprecedented drop in small plant-like organisms in the northeastern Pacific Ocean that form the base of the ocean food chain, potentially affecting fish, birds and marine mammals, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Global Change Biology
Puget Sound salmon face more ups and downs in river flows
Climate change projections predict increased climate variability, which is already appearing in the form of more pronounced fluctuations in salmon rivers around Puget Sound, Wash. That poses increased risks for threatened Chinook salmon, a new study finds.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite sees demise of Tropical Cyclone Ola
Tropical Cyclone Ola was being battered by vertical wind shear in the Southern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an infrared picture of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Food Control
University of South Florida researchers develop handheld sensor to sniff out fish fraud
Researchers at the University of South Florida's College of Marine Science have developed a handheld sensor capable of debunking fraudulent seafood species claims, helping to ensure that consumers are get what they pay for.
Florida Sea Grant, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc.

Contact: Dr. John Paul
jpaul@usf.edu
727-553-1168
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
How will ocean acidification impact marine life?
A new analysis provides a holistic assessment of the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine organisms including coral, shellfish, sea urchins, and other calcifying species.
European Research Council

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-676-838-07316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Showing releases 246-255 out of 382.

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