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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-35 out of 395.

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Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Swirling currents deliver phytoplankton carbon to ocean depths
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event -- a massive phytoplankton bloom -- unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic. But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning
A new study published by Science and led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change. Data from nearly two decades of satellite missions have shown that the ice volume decline is accelerating.
NASA

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
A decade in, have Australia's no-take reserves protected life on the Reef?
The expansion of no-take marine reserves within Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park more than a decade ago is working to protect fish just as experts had hoped it would, say researchers who have been monitoring the reef via underwater surveys. The findings, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 26, come as encouraging news for Australia's largest reef and for other, similar projects around the world.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Coastal property values could erode if nourishment subsidies end
The value of many oceanfront properties on the East Coast could drop dramatically if Congress were to suddenly end federal beach nourishment subsidies. Values could fall by as much as 17 percent in towns with high property values and almost 34 percent in towns with low property values. A gradual reduction of the subsidies, in contrast, is more likely to smooth the transition to more climate-resilient coastal communities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Marine Environmental Research
A mile deep, ocean fish facing health impacts from human pollution
Deep-water marine fish living on the continental slopes at depths from 2,000 feet to one mile have liver pathologies, tumors and other health problems that may be linked to human-caused pollution, one of the first studies of its type has found. The findings appear to reflect general ocean conditions.
European Union

Contact: Michael Kent
Michael.kent@oregonstate.edu
541-737-8652
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
Florida Tech study finds climate refuges where corals survive, grow
As rising ocean temperatures continue to fuel the disappearance of reef-building corals, a new study from Florida Tech finds there may be some climate refuges where corals will survive in the future.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Shell-shocked: Ocean acidification likely hampers tiny shell builders in Southern Ocean
University of Colorado Boulder study shows a ubiquitous type of phytoplankton -- tiny organisms that are the base of the marine food web -- appears to be suffering from the effects of ocean acidification caused by climate change.
National Science Foundation, NOAA

Contact: Natalie Freeman
natalie.freeman@colorado.edu
303-735-1337
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Q&A with Rex Buchanan, solar storm satellite, pollution from aquifers
This week from AGU: a Q&A with Rex Buchanan, solar storm satellite and pollution from aquifers.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
914-552-5759
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees semnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Nathan
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Nathan over the southern Top End of Australia's Northern Territory on March 25.NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Nathan over the southern Top End of Australia's Northern Territory on March 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Ecological Applications
Rethinking wetland restoration: Smaller wetlands more valuable than previously thought
Most efforts to protect and restore wetlands mistakenly focus on preserving only total wetland area, with no consideration of ecosystem services provided by different wetland types, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Ecological Applications last month, shows wetland loss follows a strong pattern, with smaller, isolated wetlands being lost in much greater numbers than larger wetlands.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Showing releases 26-35 out of 395.

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