Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-35 out of 393.

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Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
Ocean acidification makes coralline algae less robust
Ocean acidification (the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by the uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere), is affecting the formation of the skeleton of coralline algae which play an important part in marine biodiversity, new research from the University of Bristol has found.
German Ministry of Research and Technology, Leverhulme Trust

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Climate Change
Scientists say window to reduce carbon emissions is small
At the rate humans are emitting carbon into the atmosphere, the Earth may suffer irreparable damage that could last tens of thousands of years, according to a new analysis. Sea level rise is a critical issue. With seven degrees (Celsius) warming at the high-end scenario of temperature increase, the sea level rise is estimated at 50 meters, over a period of several centuries to millennia.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1247
Oregon State University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
PLOS ONE
The mystery of the Red Sea
An international team of biologists including researchers from the Moscow State University discovered new species of fluorescent polyps living in colonies on the shells of gastropods.

Contact: Vladimir Koryagin
science-release@rector.msu.ru
Lomonosov Moscow State University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
Man-made underwater sound may have wider ecosystem effects than previously thought
Underwater sound linked to human activity could alter the behaviour of seabed creatures that play a vital role in marine ecosystems, according to new research from the University of Southampton.
Environmental Technology Programme, BP International Ltd

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
An international research team found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators. As a consequence they are captured more easily and their survival chances are halved.

Contact: Mark McCormick
Mark.McCormick@jcu.edu.au
61-040-937-1015
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
Dr Stephen Simpson and his international research team found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators. As a consequence they are captured more easily and their survival chances are halved.
Natural Environment Research Council, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Duncan Sandes
d.sandes@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
Plastic debris crossing the Pacific can transport more species with the help of barnacles
The smooth surfaces of much of the plastic waste rapidly increasing in the ocean appear to provide poor habitat for animals -- that is, until barnacles step in.

Contact: Mike Gil
m.gil@ufl.edu
University of Florida

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Bachelor's paradise: FSU researcher finds female turtles outnumbering males
Rising global temperatures may skew gender imbalance among the marine turtle population, according to new Florida State University research.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
The odor of stones
A recent study by Chemists of the University Jena (Germany) published in the current issue of 'Nature Communications' demonstrates that diatoms are able to trace silicate minerals in the water. Moreover, they can even move actively to areas where the concentration of silicates is especially high (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10540).

Contact: Ute Schoenfelder
presse@uni-jena.de
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
The seawater temperature distribution in tropics affects the rainfall in East Asia
A wide swatch of Asia, from the tropics to the mid-latitudes, which has wet and dry seasons, is significantly affected by 'Asian monsoons.' The amount of rainfall in particular has a close relationship to agriculture and damage from flooding.
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Ministry of the Environment

Contact: Masataka Watanabe
kohositu@un.tsukuba.ac.jp
81-298-532-039
University of Tsukuba

Showing releases 26-35 out of 393.

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