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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-35 out of 394.

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Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
ERC Advanced Grant: University of Southern Denmark sets out to explore deep ocean trenches
A team led by Professor Ronnie N. Glud from University of Southern Denmark has received an ERC Advanced Grant of 3,185,000 euros to carry out a series of ambitious explorations of the deepest parts of the oceans. Previous expeditions led by Professor Glud have revealed surprisingly high levels of biological activity at nearly 11 km deep. Now the aim is to investigate how life can exist at these depths and how its activity affects the biogeochemical functioning of the oceans and the Earth.
European Research Council

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
nyviden@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Ecological Applications
Restored streams take 25 years or longer to recover
New research has found that the number of plant species growing just next to restored streams can take up to 25 years to increase above those channelized during the timber floating era. This is according to doctoral student, Eliza Maher Hasselquist, and other researchers from Umeå University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Formas-funded RESTORE Project, Björkman's Foundation

Contact: Eliza Maher Hasselquist
eliza.hasselquist@umu.se
46-703-769-515
Umea University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
ISME Journal
Ocean algae will cope well in varying climates, study shows
Tiny marine algae that play a critical role in supporting life on Earth may be better equipped to deal with future climate change than previously expected, research shows.
Royal Society, European Commission, Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
New study reveals mechanism regulating methane emissions in freshwater wetlands
Though they occupy a small fraction of the Earth's surface, freshwater wetlands are the largest natural source of methane going into the atmosphere. New research from the University of Georgia identifies an unexpected process that acts as a key gatekeeper regulating methane emissions from these freshwater environments. The study, published in Nature Communications by Samantha Joye and colleagues, describes how high rates of anaerobic methane oxidation substantially reduce atmospheric emissions of methane from freshwater wetlands.
National Science Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Research Center/Cluster of Excellence at the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen

Contact: Samantha Joye
mjoye@uga.edu
706-542-5893
University of Georgia

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Toxicological Sciences
Flatworms could replace mammals for some toxicology tests
Laboratories that test chemicals for neurological toxicity could reduce their use of laboratory mice and rats by replacing these animal models with tiny aquatic flatworms known as freshwater planarians.
National Institutes of Health, Hellman Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Young Researchers Award winner to help advance biodiversity informatics in South Africa
Fatima Parker-Allie, a South African Ph.D. student, is a recipient of the GBIF Young Researchers' Award for 2015. Parker-Allie seeks to advance the biodiversity informatics in South Africa in three complementary areas: The development of a national BSc (honors) curriculum for biodiversity informatics; data quality improvements that make biodiversity data more fit for use in research applications; and distribution models of commercially important fish species in southern African waters under different climate scenarios.

Contact: Sampreethi Aipanjiguly
saipanjiguly@gbif.org
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Freshwater and ocean acidification stunts growth of developing pink salmon
Pink salmon that begin life in freshwater with high concentrations of carbon dioxide, which causes acidification, are smaller and may be less likely to survive, according to a new study from UBC.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Retreating sea ice linked to changes in ocean circulation, could affect European climate
Retreating sea ice in the Iceland and Greenland Seas may be changing the circulation of warm and cold water in the Atlantic Ocean, and could ultimately impact the climate in Europe, says a new study by an atmospheric physicist from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) and his colleagues in Great Britain, Norway and the United States.

Contact: Nicolle Wahl
nicolle.wahl@utoronto.ca
905-569-4656
University of Toronto

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
CCNY researchers develop eco-friendly oil spill solution
City College of New York researchers led by chemist George John have developed an eco-friendly biodegradable green 'herding' agent that can be used to clean up light crude oil spills on water.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Showing releases 26-35 out of 394.

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