Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-35 out of 392.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Science Advances
Corals most important for building reefs are now in sharp decline
Staghorns, the very corals responsible for establishing today's reefs, are now some of the most threatened coral species due to climate change and other man-made stressors.

Contact: Melissa Lyne
melissa.lyne@gmail.com
041-551-4328
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Journal of Physical Oceanography
Plastic below the ocean surface
Current measurement methods skim the surface of the ocean while computer modeling shows ocean turbulence may force plastics far below the surface despite their buoyancy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Water color and phytoplankton growth in the Gulf of Maine are changing
Researchers from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences and the US Geological Survey found that the amount of dissolved organic carbon from rivers emptying into the Gulf of Maine has increased over the last 80 years, a trend they predict will continue through 2100 if annual precipitation continues to increase. Runoff is changing the color of the seawater, reducing the light available to phytoplankton for photosynthesis, causing a decline in overall productivity.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
Advances in extracting uranium from seawater announced in special issue
The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium--enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have been published by the American Chemical Society's journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led more than half of the 30 papers in the special issue.
DOE/Office of Nuclear Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Amos intensifying
Tropical Cyclone 20P, now named Amos, has continued to organize and strengthen in the Southern Pacific and is now threatening Pago Pago. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the storm on April 21 as a Flash Flood Watch continued for all islands in American Samoa.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
A $5,000 idea blossomed into a $300,000 algae research and innovation accelerator
A one-stop shopping facility for algal research and development, the Maine Algal Research and Innovation Accelerator, MARIA, will be constructed on the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences campus in East Boothbay this spring. MARIA will initially be used to develop better fatty acid products for a variety of medical conditions. The Maine Institute of Technology provided startup funds. The Maine Community Foundation is providing funds for the construction project and scaling up of activity.
Maine Technology Institute, Maine Community Foundation

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
NASA sees changes in Tropical Cyclone Fantala
Once a powerful Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale, Tropical Cyclone Fantala continues to move north of Madagascar on April 21. NASA's Terra satellite and GPM satellite passed over the storm finding heavy rainfall, a clouded eye, and vertical wind shear affecting the storm as it turned in its track.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
101st Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America comes to southern Florida
Environmental scientists will gather in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Aug. 7-12, 2016 for the 101st Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. The meeting theme 'Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene' invites conversation on the new relationships between species arising under the influence of global change as a backdrop for 2,000 presentations of breaking research and ecological concepts at the Greater Fort Lauderdale/ Broward County Convention Center.

Contact: Liza Lester
LLester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Freshwater Science
Crayfish may help restore dirty streams, Stroud study finds
While macroinvertebrates are a tasty food source for crayfish, a new study reveals a surprising finding: when crayfish were present in in-stream experimental enclosures, macroinvertebrate density was higher, not lower.

Contact: Melinda Daniels, Ph.D.
mdaniels@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x268
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
EGU 2016: European Geosciences Union General Assembly
Earth System Dynamics
1.5 C vs 2 C global warming: New study shows why half a degree matters
European researchers found substantially different climate change impacts for global warming of 1.5°C and 2°C by 2100, the two temperature limits of the Paris climate agreement. The additional 0.5°C would mean a 10-cm-higher global sea-level rise, longer heat waves, and would result in virtually all tropical coral reefs being at risk. The research is published today in Earth System Dynamics, an European Geosciences Union journal, and is presented at the EGU General Assembly.

Contact: Barbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

Showing releases 26-35 out of 392.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>