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Video:Archerfish hunt by shooting jets of water at potential prey, and a Current Biology paper finds that they might be even better shots than we thought. See the video here and read about the research on EurekAlert!.
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September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruña, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-260 out of 419.

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Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Research shows declining levels of acidity in Sierra Nevada lakes
A team led by an environmental scientist at the University of California, Riverside has conducted research on lakes in the Sierra Nevada -- the most sensitive lakes in the US to acid rain, according to the Environmental Protection Agency -- and described human impacts on them during the 20th century. The conclusion is the overall news is good: Air quality regulation has benefited aquatic ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada; controlling air pollution is benefiting nature in California.
National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, National Science Foundation, University of California, Geological Society of America

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes within the body of the ocean
For decades, medical researchers have sought new methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Current Biology
Archerfish target shoot with 'skillfully thrown' water
Archerfish hunt by shooting jets of water at unsuspecting prey on leaves or twigs above, knocking them into the water below before gobbling them up. Now, a study finds that those fish are much more adaptable and skillful target-shooters than anyone had given them credit for. The fish really do use water as a tool making them the first known tool-using animal to adaptively change the hydrodynamic properties of a free jet of water.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Geosphere
Team develops new, inexpensive method for understanding earthquake topography
Using high-resolution topography models not available in the past, geologists can greatly enrich their research. However, current methods of acquisition are costly and require trained personnel with high-tech, cumbersome equipment. In light of this, Kendra Johnson and colleagues have developed a new system that takes advantage of affordable, user-friendly equipment and software to produce topography data over small, sparsely vegetated sites at comparable (or better) resolution and accuracy to standard methods.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
New deep sea mushroom-shaped organisms discovered
The new organisms are multicellular and mostly non-symmetrical, with a dense layer of gelatinous material between the outer skin cell and inner stomach cell layers.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
BioScience
Pesticide risk assessments seen as biased
The Environmental Protection Agency's pesticide toxicity assessments often rely heavily on industry-funded studies and may omit research that could lead to different findings. The assessment process should be reformed in order to eliminate conflicts of interest and include a wider breadth of available information.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
Underwater grass comeback bodes well for Chesapeake Bay
The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses in the upper Chesapeake Bay, virtually disappeared after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. The grasses mysteriously began to come back in the early 2000s. Today the bed is one of the biggest and healthiest in the Bay, spanning some 20 square miles. Scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are figuring out what's behind the comeback.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Geology
Plant life forms in the fossil record: When did the first canopy flowers appear?
Most plant fossils are isolated organs, making it difficult to reconstruct the type of plant life or its ecosystem structure. In their study for Geology, published online on Aug. 28, 2014, researchers Camilla Crifò and colleagues used leaf vein density, a trait visible on leaf compression fossils, to document the occurrence of stratified forests with a canopy dominated by flowering plants.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
BioScience
Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout
Following the oil spill caused by the blowout at the Macondo wellhead in 2010, Gulf of Mexico microbial population dynamics shifted rapidly as numbers of oil degraders quickly increased. In addition, the spill provided an opportunity to study the newly described phenomenon of microbe-derived marine snow.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chaos
Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries
Researchers have created a new model that could help determine what area of the world is to blame for each ocean garbage patch of floating debris -- a difficult task for a system as complex and massive as the ocean. The researchers describe the model in a paper published in the journal Chaos.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Showing releases 251-260 out of 419.

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