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Video: Engineers are investigating the biomechanics of fish locomotion, in hopes of contributing to the next generation of robotic fish and underwater submersibles. See the video, from the National Science Foundation, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

Submit a Calendar Item

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-260 out of 319.

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Public Release: 15-May-2014
Current Biology
How octopuses don't tie themselves in knots
An octopus's arms are covered in hundreds of suckers that will stick to just about anything, with one important exception. Those suckers generally won't grab onto the octopus itself; otherwise, the impressively flexible animals would quickly find themselves all tangled up.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Scientists test hearing in Bristol Bay beluga whale population
How well do marine mammals hear in the wild? WHOI biologist Aran Mooney and his colleagues are the first to publish a study of hearing in a population of wild marine mammals.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Ecology
Turtle migration directly influenced by ocean drift experiences as hatchlings
New research has found that adult sea-turtle migrations and their selection of feeding sites are directly influenced by their past experiences as little hatchlings adrift in ocean currents.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Research reveals New Zealand sea lion is a relative newcomer
The modern New Zealand sea lion is a relative newcomer to our mainland, replacing a now-extinct, unique prehistoric New Zealand sea-lion that once lived here, according to a new study.
Marsden Fund

Contact: Dr. Catherine Collins
catherine.collins01@gmail.com
University of Otago

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Scientists investigate the role of the 'silent killer' inside deep-diving animals
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and Sonoma State University have furthered science's understanding of carbon monoxide's natural characteristics and limitations by studying the gas in one of the world's best divers: the elephant seal.
Office of Naval Research, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-May-2014
ZooKeys
Extinct relative helps to reclassify the world's remaining 2 species of monk seal
The recently extinct Caribbean monk seal was one of three species of monk seal in the world. Its relationship to the Mediterranean and Hawaiian monk seals, both living but endangered, has never been fully understood. Through DNA analysis and skull comparisons Smithsonian scientists and colleagues have now clarified the Caribbean species' place on the seal family tree and created a completely new genus. The team's findings are published in the scientific journal ZooKeys.

Contact: John Gibbons
gibbonsjp@si.edu
202-633-5187
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 13-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Tiny, tenacious and tentatively toxic
Sometimes we think we know everything about something only to find out we really don't, said a Texas A&M University scientist.

Contact: Steve Byrns
s-byrns@tamu.edu
325-653-4576 x215
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Public Release: 13-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Smithsonian scientists link unusual fish larva to new species of sea bass from Curacao
Identifying larval stages of marine fishes in the open ocean is difficult because the young fishes often bear little or no resemblance to the adults they will become. Confronted with a perplexing fish larva collected in the Florida Straits, Smithsonian scientists turned to DNA barcoding, which yielded an unexpected discovery -- a match between the mysterious fish larva and adults of a new species of sea bass discovered off the coast of Curacao.

Contact: John Gibbons
gibbonsjp@si.edu
202-633-5187
Smithsonian

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Nature Communications
Coral reefs are critical for risk reduction & adaptation
Stronger storms, rising seas, and flooding are placing hundreds of millions people at risk around the world, and big part of the solution to decrease those risks is just off shore. A new study finds that coral reefs reduce the wave energy that would otherwise impact coastlines by 97 percent.
US Geological Survey, Nature Conservancy, Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Leslie Gordon
lgordon@usgs.gov
650-329-4006
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
A tiny, toothy catfish with bulldog snout defies classification
Kryptoglanis shajii is a strange fish -- and the closer scientists look, the stranger it gets. This small subterranean catfish sees the light of day and human observers only rarely, when it turns up in springs, wells and flooded rice paddies. Drexel scientists have recently provided a detailed description of this fish's bizarre bone structures.

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Showing releases 251-260 out of 319.

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