Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 256-265 out of 383.

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Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future
Science
First brain scans of sea lions give clues to strandings
Brain scans and behavioral tests of California sea lions that stranded on shore show how an algal toxin disrupts brain networks, leading to deficits in spatial memory.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Nature Geoscience
Mountain growth helped spawn fish diversity in New Zealand
The growth of mountain ranges on New Zealand's South Island directly influenced the evolution of different freshwater fish species in the region, according to new University of Otago-led research. The findings are published online this week in Nature Geoscience. The study provides an example of how natural changes in the Earth's landscape and topography can help shape and increase local biodiversity.
Marsden Fund of New Zealand

Contact: Dave Craw
dave.craw@otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals: Bridging the Past Toward the Future
Science
Sea lions exposed to algal toxin show impaired spatial memory
California sea lions exposed to the algal toxin domoic acid can suffer brain damage that leads to significant deficits in spatial memory. The new findings suggest that chronic exposure to the toxin, produced by naturally occurring marine algae, causes impairments that are likely to affect sea lions' ability to navigate in their ocean habitat and survive in the wild.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 13-Dec-2015
21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals
Bycatch threatens marine mammals, but new protections hold promise for Mexican vaquita
Gillnetting around the world is ensnaring hundreds of thousands of small cetaceans every year, threatening several species of dolphins and porpoises with extinction, according to research presented at the Society of Marine Mammalogy's 21st biennial conference in San Francisco this week. But there is one bright spot in the Gulf of California, where Mexican authorities earlier this year instituted an emergency two-year ban on gillnetting to help save the critically endangered vaquita.

Contact: Michael Milstein
mmilstein@msn.com
971-313-1466
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
NASA sees formation of Tropical Depression Melor in northwestern Pacific Ocean
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image as Tropical Depression Melor formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean close to the island of Yap.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
NASA measures rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Bohale
NASA analyzed the rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Cyclone 05S, now renamed Tropical Cyclone Bohale.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Geology
Mapping downgoing plate topography: The 2005 Sumatra earthquake
New geophysical data show that fault slip during the March 2005 magnitude 8.7 (Mw) earthquake off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia (also referred to as the Simeulue-Nias earthquake), was stopped by the topography on the downgoing plate.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Science
Functions of global ocean microbiome key to understanding environmental changes
The billions of marine microorganisms present in every liter of seawater represent a structured ecological community that regulates how the Earth functions in practically every way, from energy consumption to respiration. The function and behavior of this community will determine how the global ocean responds to broader environmental changes, according to a new review article published in the journal Science by University of Georgia marine scientist Mary Ann Moran.

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Current Biology
CRISPR-Cas9 helps uncover genetics of exotic organisms
A revolutionary gene-editing tool is transforming the study of standard lab animals like the fruit fly, but could have even greater impact in genetic studies of more exotic animals, like the octopus or sea anemone. UC Berkeley scientists used CRISRP-Cas9 to quickly and efficiently knock out six Hox genes in the amphipod, revealing one example of how segmented animals deploy different limbs on different segments, like tools in a Swiss army knife.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-915-3097
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
US Pacific Northwest's extreme rainfall tallied by NASA's IMERG
As moisture from the tropics has been streaming into the Pacific Northwest by the 'Pineapple Express' NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission and a cadre of other satellites have been gathering data on the extreme rainfall. The continued 'training' of rainfall into the area has caused flooding in the Portland, Oregon area with at least one death reported. Western Washington is also on flood alert due to the deluge.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 256-265 out of 383.

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