Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 261-270 out of 386.

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Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Oecologia
Coral reefs could be more vulnerable to coastal development than predicted
For years, many scientists thought we had a secret weapon to protect coral reefs from nutrients flushed into the seas by human activity. Experiments suggested that herbivores such as fish, urchins and sea turtles could keep corals and their ecosystems healthy by eating up extra algae that grew in the presence of these nutrients. But a new University of Florida study sheds doubt on that idea, underscoring the importance of sustainable growth in coastal areas.

Contact: Mike Gil
mikegil@sciall.org
832-377-6445
University of Florida

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Journal of Systematic Palaeontology
International research partnership yields discovery of a new fossil species
The discovery also reveals the unique binocular vision of the first ancient marine reptile of its kind to be found in Japan.
Japanese town of Mukawa, The Hobetsu Museum in Mukawa, Brandon University, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council Discovery Grant, NSERC/Accelerator Grant, Chairs Research Allowance

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
Microplastics: Rhine one of the most polluted rivers worldwide
Between Basel and Rotterdam, the Rhine has one of the highest microplastics pollution so far measured in rivers, with the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan area showing peak numbers of up to four times the average. Among investigated rivers, the Rhine is thus among those most heavily polluted with microplastics. This is reported by researchers from the University of Basel. Their results have been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Planners aim for coastal growth in all the right places
When it comes to helping coastal communities be more resilient to weather hazards, ideas don't need to be sandbagged, experts say. That's why the Federal Emergency Management Agency has granted $750,000 to a program that already is experienced in working with city leaders along the Texas coast and other Gulf states.
US Federal Emergency Management Agency

Contact: Kathleen Phillips
ka-phillips@tamu.edu
979-845-2872
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Marine Chemistry
New research sheds light on mercury pollution in estuaries, food chain
Two studies by Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues shed new light on mercury pollution in the waters of the northeastern United States.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 4-Dec-2015
Citizen-science climate project adds logs from historic Arctic whaling ships
Old Weather is a citizen-science project that is mining historic ship logs to get a unique peek at Arctic climate over the past two centuries. The project just added hundreds of whaling ships that observed Arctic sea ice in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 4-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
Ocean toxicity hampered the rapid evolution of complex life
By examining rocks at the bottom of ancient oceans, an international group of researchers have revealed that arsenic concentrations in the oceans have varied greatly over time. But also that in the very early oceans, arsenic co-varied with the rise of atmospheric oxygen and coincided with the coming and going of global glaciations. The study was recently published in the Nature Group Journal, Scientific Reports.
European Research Council

Contact: Dr Ernest Chi Fru, Stockhholm University
ernest.chifru@geo.su.se
46-073-333-3647
Stockholm University

Public Release: 3-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
Protecting ocean species
A new study offers strategic guidance on the placement of marine protected areas to meet global conservation goals.

Contact: By James Badham
james@bren.ucsb.edu
805-893-5049
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 3-Dec-2015
American Geophysical Union conference
Higher levels of Fukushima cesium detected offshore
Scientists monitoring the spread of radiation in the ocean from the Fukushima nuclear accident report finding an increased number of contaminated sites off the US West Coast, along with the highest detection level to date, from a sample collected about 1,600 miles west of San Francisco. The level of cesium in the sample is 50 percent higher than other samples collected, but is still more than 500 times lower than US government safety limits.
National Science Foundation, crowd funding

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
Study: 17K marine species unprotected
A new study says that more than 17,000 marine species worldwide remain largely unprotected, with the US among the bottom in supporting formal marine protected areas that could safeguard marine biodiversity.

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society

Showing releases 261-270 out of 386.

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