Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 266-275 out of 381.

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Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Smoke and mirrors on coral reefs: How a tiny fish deceives its prey
Basel Zoologists are unveiling the colorful secrets of coral reefs: On the Australian Great Barrier Reef they discovered a coral reef fish, the dusky dottyback that flexibly adapts its coloration to mimic other fishes and in doing is able to prey on their juvenile offspring. By changing colors, the dusky dottyback also decreases its risk of being detected by predators. The study has been published in the latest issue of the renowned scientific journal Current Biology.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
NASA sees Cyclone Nathan target landfall in Queensland's Cape York Peninsula
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Nathan early on March 19 as it was headed for landfall in Queensland's Cape York Peninsula. NASA's RapidScat instrument saw those winds increasing late on March 18.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Ecology
Waterloo creates cutting-edge tool to help predict impact of invasive species
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have published results of a powerful new tool that could give ecologists new ways of tackling problems posed by deadly invasive species like Asian carp and Zebra mussels. Invasive species cost us more in environmental, economic, and health-care related damages than all other natural disasters combined. Being able to predict how a species 'fits' into an environment -- the so-called species niche -- can help managers prevent, predict, and manage the next big invasion.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Ocean pipes 'not cool,' would end up warming climate
There are a variety of proposals that involve using vertical ocean pipes to move seawater to the surface from the depths in order to reap different potential climate benefits. One idea involves using ocean pipes to facilitate direct physical cooling of the surface ocean by replacing warm surface ocean waters with colder, deeper waters. New research shows that these pipes could actually increase global warming quite drastically.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Color-morphing reef fish is a 'wolf in sheep's clothing'
The dottyback changes its color to match surrounding damselfish species, enabling it to counter the defenses of its damselfish prey by disguising itself as a harmless part of their community, then swooping in to hunt their young.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Science
Government action needed on iconic World Heritage ecosystems
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems, UNESCO World Heritage sites are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in a study published in the journal Science.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Science
World Heritage Sites risk collapse without stronger local management
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in Science. Protecting places of global environmental importance such as the Great Barrier Reef and the Amazon rainforest from climate change will require reducing the other pressures they face, for example overfishing, fertilizer pollution or land clearing.
European Research Council, Spinoza, Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, National Science Foundation, WIMEK, Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek, South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies

Contact: Marten Scheffer
marten.scheffer@wur.nl
31-641-804-880
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Geosphere
Unaweep Canyon and Earth's deep-time past
Unaweep Canyon is a puzzling landscape -- the only canyon on Earth with two mouths. First formally documented by western explorers mapping the Colorado Territory in the 1800s, Unaweep Canyon has inspired numerous hypotheses for its origin. This new paper for Geosphere by Gerilyn S. Soreghan and colleagues brings together old and new geologic data of this region to further the hypothesis that Unaweep Canyon was formed in multiple stages.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan sporting hot towers, heavy rainfall
The TRMM satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Nathan had powerful thunderstorms known as 'hot towers' near its center which are indicative of a strengthening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
NASA-JAXA's GPM satellite close-up of Cyclone Pam's rainfall
As one of the strongest cyclones every recorded in the South Pacific Ocean, Cyclone Pam devastated the island archipelago of Vanuatu. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory provided data on rain rates throughout the storm. At the end of Pam's life on March 17, NASA's RapidScat provided a look at the winds of the waning storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 266-275 out of 381.

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