Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 266-275 out of 397.

<< < 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Global Change Biology
Sardines move north due to ocean warming
Sardines, anchovies and mackerels play a crucial role in marine ecosystems, as well as having a high commercial value. However, the warming of waters makes them vanish from their usual seas and migrate north, as confirmed by a pioneering study analyzing 57,000 fish censuses from 40 years. The researchers warn that coastal towns dependent on these fishery resources must adapt their economies.

Contact: SINC Team
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
Major changes in coastal marine ecosystems forecasted in new climate models
By the end of the 21st century, climate change will significantly alter an important oceanographic process that regulates the productivity of fisheries and marine ecosystems, Northeastern researchers report in a new paper in published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Contact: Emily Bhatti
e.bhatti@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
Global warming to increase ocean upwelling, but fisheries impact uncertain
A report to be published Thursday in the journal Nature suggests that global warming may increase upwelling in several ocean current systems around the world by the end of this century, especially at high latitudes, and will cause major changes in marine biodiversity.
Northeastern University, National Science Foundation

Contact: Bruce Menge
mengeb@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-5358
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
UM Rosenstiel School professor receives $2.5 million to study Agulhas Current
Scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science received a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct a climate research study off the coast of South Africa.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
When estimating fish populations, seeing is believing
By adding video cameras to fish traps, scientists get more precise abundance estimates for several important species of reef fish, including red snapper and gag grouper. In the accompanying audio podcast, a scientist and a fisherman share very different perspectives on why this is important.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
National Invasive Species Awareness Week 2015
UT Arlington zebra mussels expert to receive national recognition
UT Arlington biology professor emeritus Robert McMahon, widely known for his research of invasive zebra mussels, will receive the National Invasive Species Council's Lifetime Achievement Award Feb. 22-28 in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Royal Society Open Science
New species, the 'Ruby Seadragon,' discovered by Scripps researchers
While researching the two known species of seadragons as part of an effort to understand and protect the exotic and delicate fish, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego made a startling discovery: a third species of sea dragon, named the 'Ruby Seadragon' because of its bright red colors.
Lowe Family Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
NASA satellites catch birth of Tropical Cyclone Lam in Gulf of Carpentaria
After Tropical Cyclone Lam formed in the northern Gulf of Carpentaria on Feb. 17, two NASA satellites provided data on the storm. NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement core satellite captured images of the newborn storm showing cloud extent and rainfall rates.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research -- Oceans
This week From AGU: Oklahoma earthquake faults, earthquake monitoring, and sea ice
The Feb. 17, 2015, edition of This Week From AGU features articles Oklahoma earthquake faults, earthquake monitoring, and sea ice.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Mapping seascapes in the deep ocean
Researchers from University of Southampton have developed a new, automated method for classifying hundreds of miles of the deep sea floor, in a way that is more cost efficient, quicker and more objective than previously possible.
European Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 266-275 out of 397.

<< < 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>