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Blub blub blub Marine protected areas are a crucial part of preserving biodiversity. Track and analyze them by country and location with MPAtlas. This resource is provided by the Marine Conservation Institute.
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Video: A juvenile whale shark cruises over the shallow reef shelf of the South Ari Marine Protected Area. At 42km2 S.A.MPA is the largest Marine Protected Area in the Maldives and one of the few places in the world where whale sharks can be encountered all year round. See the video, from The Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruņa, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 271-280 out of 358.

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Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Geology
New study: Ancient Arctic sharks tolerated brackish water 50 million years ago
Sharks were a tolerant bunch some 50 million years ago, cruising an Arctic Ocean that contained about the same percentage of freshwater as Louisiana's Lake Ponchatrain does today, says a new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jaelyn Eberle
jaelyn.eberle@colorado.edu
303-919-6914
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
All the world's oceans have plastic debris on their surface
The Malaspina Expedition, led by the Spanish National Research Council, have demonstrated that there are five large accumulations of plastic debris in the open ocean that match with the five major twists of oceanic surface water circulation. In addition to the known accumulation of plastic waste in the North Pacific, there are similar accumulations in the central North Atlantic, the South Pacific, the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean.

Contact: Marta García Gonzalo
marta.garcia@csic.es
34-915-681-476
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
It's a girl! Gene silencing technology alters sex of prawns
Israeli scientists have developed a novel method for generating single-sex populations of prawns. This could be used to boost the productivity of aquaculture farms and even as a biocontrol measure against invasive species and pests.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
Climate change could stop fish finding their friends
Like humans, fish prefer to group with individuals with whom they are familiar, rather than strangers. This gives numerous benefits including higher growth and survival rates, greater defense against predators and faster social learning. However, high carbon dioxide levels, such as those anticipated by climate change models, may hinder the ability of fish to recognize one another and form groups with familiar individuals.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Marine bacteria are natural source of chemical fire retardants
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a widely distributed group of marine bacteria that produce compounds nearly identical to toxic man-made fire retardants.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Water samples teeming with information: Emerging techniques for environmental monitoring
Setting effective conservation policies requires near real-time knowledge of environmental conditions. Scientists with Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions propose using genetic techniques as a low-cost, quick way to collect such data.
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Stanford Woods Institute

Contact: Terry Nagel
tnagel@stanford.edu
650-498-0607
Stanford University

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice ages
Climate scientists have long tried to explain why ice-age cycles became longer and more intense some 900,000 years ago, switching from 41,000-year cycles to 100,000-year cycles.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
New report evaluates progress of comprehensive everglades restoration plan
Although planning for Everglades restoration projects has advanced considerably over the past two years, financial, procedural, and policy constraints have impeded project implementation, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council.

Contact: Lauren Rugani
news@nas.edu
202-334-2076
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Global Change Biology
Climate change and the ecology of fear
Climate change is predicted to have major impacts on the many species that call our rocky shorelines home. Indeed, species living in these intertidal habitats, which spend half their day exposed to air and the other half submerged by water, may be subjected to a double whammy as both air and water temperatures rise. Given the reliance of human society on nearshore coastal ecosystems, it is critical that we better understand how climate change will affect them.

Contact: Lori Lennon
l.lennon@neu.edu
617-680-5129
Northeastern University College of Science

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Extinct undersea volcanoes squashed under Earth's crust cause tsunami earthquakes, according to new research
New research has revealed the causes and warning signs of rare tsunami earthquakes.

Contact: Colin Smith
cd.smith@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46712
Imperial College London

Showing releases 271-280 out of 358.

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