Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-285 out of 377.

<< < 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 > >>

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Zootaxa
Researchers describe 5 new species of marine invertebrates
Brazilian researchers described five new species of ascidians, commonly known as sea squirts, ascidians are marine invertebrates that generally form permanently submerged colonies. Exotic molecules obtained from research on ascidians have been explored worldwide for use in combating cancer.
São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Kansas State University graduate student to attend Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting
Courtney Passow, Kansas State University doctoral student in biology, is one of 672 young scientists selected worldwide to attend the prestigious Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany.
Mars Inc.

Contact: Courtney Passow
cnpassow@k-state.edu
Kansas State University

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Plants' defensive responses have downstream effects on nearby ecosystems
Chemical changes that occur in tree leaves after being attacked by insects and mammals can impact nearby streams, which rely on fallen plant material as a food source, report scientists from the University of Chicago Department of Ecology and Evolution. The study, published March 17 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows how interactions between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are an essential part of understanding ecological responses to climate change.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Education, University of Chicago Hinds Fund, Olympic National Resources

Contact: Matt Wood
matthew.wood@uchospitals.edu
773-702-5894
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Scientific Data
New lake surface temperature database will help to study climate change: York U researcher
Eighty two researchers from more than 20 countries were involved in the effort that began in 2011. They collected data from major lakes in North America, South America, Europe, Asia and the Oceanic region. The database provides information such as air temperature, solar radiation and cloud cover that define climate, and geomorphometric characteristics including latitude, longitude, elevation, depth and volume, which may influence lake temperature.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
suhasini@yorku.ca
416-736-2100
York University

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Bavi losing steam
Tropical Cyclone Bavi's convection and developing thunderstorms have been waning because of wind shear, and NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the weakening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
NASA eyes Tropical Cyclone Nathan's Australian comeback
NASA's Aqua satellite saw Tropical Storm Nathan preparing for its Australian 'comeback' as the storm made a loop in the Coral Sea and is headed back to Queensland.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
Gulf of Mexico marine food web changes over the decades
Scientists in the Gulf of Mexico now have a better understanding of how naturally-occurring climate cycles -- as well as human activities -- can cause widespread ecosystem changes. These major shifts happen once every few decades in the Gulf, and can impact ecosystem components, including fisheries. Understanding how and why these shifts occur can help communities and industries alter management strategies in light of them. NOAA Research & NOAA Fisheries scientists have teamed up with the University of Miami and University of Texas to learn more.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
RapidScat eyes Ex-Tropical Cyclone Pam's winds near Chatham Islands
The New Zealand Meteorological Service issued a Storm Warning for the Chatham Islands today as NASA's RapidScat instrument found that winds in one quadrant of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Pam is still generating tropical-storm-force winds east of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Ecosystem Health and Sustainability
Interdisciplinary, OA journal launched by the Ecological Societies of American and China
Ecosystem Health and Sustainability, the first ecological journal published cooperatively by scientific societies from two countries, fosters communication of applied ecological research across national and disciplinary boundaries. The open access journal encourages submissions from scientists in working in parts of the world experiencing rapid economic development, who are underrepresented in scholarly literature. The first issue launches with articles on global greenhouse gas emissions, ecosystem health indicators, and sustainable urban growth in fast-growing 21st century megacities.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
20-283-308-773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Conservation Biology
First global review on the status, future of Arctic marine mammals
A multinational team surveys the status of all Arctic marine mammals, including whales, walruses, seals and polar bears. The report is a first effort to assess the status of 78 subpopulations and recommend measures to protect these species under climate change.
NASA, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Showing releases 276-285 out of 377.

<< < 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 > >>