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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 281-290 out of 310.

<< < 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Chemosphere
Research shows arsenic, mercury and selenium in Asian carp not a health concern to most
Researchers at the Prairie Research Institute's Illinois Natural History Survey have found that overall, concentrations of arsenic, selenium, and mercury in bighead and silver carp from the lower Illinois River do not appear to be a health concern for a majority of human consumers.

Contact: Jeffrey Levengood
levengoo@illinois.edu
217-333-6767
Prairie Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Interface
'Chameleon of the sea' reveals its secrets
The cuttlefish, known as the "chameleon of the sea," can rapidly alter both the color and pattern of its skin, helping it blend in with its surroundings and avoid predators. In a paper published Jan. 29 in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the Harvard-MBL team reports new details on the sophisticated biomolecular nanophotonic system underlying the cuttlefish's color-changing ways.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Watches up in Australia as NASA sees System 99P developing
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical low pressure area designated as System 99P and infrared data shows that the low is getting organized.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
NASA spots developing tropical system affecting Mozambique's Nampala Province
NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on a developing area of tropical low pressure known as System 91S that was brushing the Nampala Province of Mozambique on January 28.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
EuroScience Open Forum 2014
5 Nobel Laureates attending EuroScience Open Forum in Copenhagen
Five Nobel Laureates will be among the speakers at Europe's largest general science event. 4,500 delegates and 30,000 visitors are expected for EuroScience Open Forum 2014 that takes place in the historic Carlsberg City District this summer. Registration for the forum has now opened.

Contact: Peter Krause
pkr@fi.fk
45-91-33-79-15
EuroScience Open Forum 2014

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Ocean acidification research should increase focus on species' ability to adapt
Not enough current research on marine ecosystems focuses on species' long-term adaptation to ocean acidification creating a murky picture of our ocean's future, according to an international study led by a University of British Columbia zoologist.

Contact: Jennifer Sunday
sunday@zoology.ubc.ca
604-789-1997
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Geological Society of America Bulletin
GSA Bulletin covers the US, Italy, Iran, Jamaica, Chile, and Argentina, and China
Learn more about river morphology in Oregon; coastal responses to sea level; the Tertiary Sabzevar Range, Iran; carbon-dioxide sequestration; fault systems in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica; Villarrica Volcano, Chile; landslide modeling; the southern Bighorn Arch, Wyoming; high-diversity plant fossil assemblages of the Salamanca Formation, Argentina; Upper Cretaceous strata, Western Interior Seaway; stratigraphy in Italy; the Soreq drainage, Israel; faulting in Surprise Valley, California; and the Qiantang River estuary, eastern China.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Geology
Is there an ocean beneath our feet?
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from the Earth's oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought. Seismologists at Liverpool have estimated that over the age of the Earth, the Japan subduction zone alone could transport the equivalent of up to three and a half times the water of all the Earth's oceans to its mantle.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
sarah.stamper@liv.ac.uk
01-517-943-044
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
University of Hawaii scientists make a big splash
Researchers from the University of Hawaii, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and University of California discovered that interplanetary dust particles could deliver water and organics to the Earth and other terrestrial planets. "It is a thrilling possibility that this influx of dust has acted as a continuous rainfall of little reaction vessels containing both the water and organics needed for the eventual origin of life on Earth and possibly Mars," said Hope Ishii, study co-author.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Scientists reveal why life got big in the Earth's early oceans
Why did life forms first begin to get larger and what advantage did this increase in size provide? UCLA biologists working with an international team of scientists examined the earliest communities of large multicellular organisms in the fossil record to help answer this question.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Showing releases 281-290 out of 310.

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