Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 281-290 out of 393.

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Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Ocean pipes 'not cool,' would end up warming climate
There are a variety of proposals that involve using vertical ocean pipes to move seawater to the surface from the depths in order to reap different potential climate benefits. One idea involves using ocean pipes to facilitate direct physical cooling of the surface ocean by replacing warm surface ocean waters with colder, deeper waters. New research shows that these pipes could actually increase global warming quite drastically.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Color-morphing reef fish is a 'wolf in sheep's clothing'
The dottyback changes its color to match surrounding damselfish species, enabling it to counter the defenses of its damselfish prey by disguising itself as a harmless part of their community, then swooping in to hunt their young.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Science
Government action needed on iconic World Heritage ecosystems
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems, UNESCO World Heritage sites are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in a study published in the journal Science.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Science
World Heritage Sites risk collapse without stronger local management
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in Science. Protecting places of global environmental importance such as the Great Barrier Reef and the Amazon rainforest from climate change will require reducing the other pressures they face, for example overfishing, fertilizer pollution or land clearing.
European Research Council, Spinoza, Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, National Science Foundation, WIMEK, Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek, South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies

Contact: Marten Scheffer
marten.scheffer@wur.nl
31-641-804-880
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Geosphere
Unaweep Canyon and Earth's deep-time past
Unaweep Canyon is a puzzling landscape -- the only canyon on Earth with two mouths. First formally documented by western explorers mapping the Colorado Territory in the 1800s, Unaweep Canyon has inspired numerous hypotheses for its origin. This new paper for Geosphere by Gerilyn S. Soreghan and colleagues brings together old and new geologic data of this region to further the hypothesis that Unaweep Canyon was formed in multiple stages.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan sporting hot towers, heavy rainfall
The TRMM satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Nathan had powerful thunderstorms known as 'hot towers' near its center which are indicative of a strengthening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
NASA-JAXA's GPM satellite close-up of Cyclone Pam's rainfall
As one of the strongest cyclones every recorded in the South Pacific Ocean, Cyclone Pam devastated the island archipelago of Vanuatu. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory provided data on rain rates throughout the storm. At the end of Pam's life on March 17, NASA's RapidScat provided a look at the winds of the waning storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees waning winds of Tropical Depression Bavi
Tropical Cyclone Bavi weakened to a depression and NASA's RapidScat instrument measured its waning winds from space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Parasite turns shrimp into voracious cannibals
Parasites can play an important role in driving cannibalism, according to a new study.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Press Office
c.j.bunting@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-32049
University of Leeds

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Submarine groundwater discharge adds as much nutrients as rivers to the Mediterranean Sea
Research led by the UAB demonstrates the importance of submarine groundwater discharge as a source of nutrients for the marine ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea. The research, published in PNAS, calculates for the first time the magnitude of submarine groundwater discharge into the Mediterranean Sea, which can reach up to 15 times higher than that of riverine runoff. Researchers point to the need of including this process in future marine studies.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Showing releases 281-290 out of 393.

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