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Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 281-290 out of 388.

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Public Release: 4-May-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Noul strengthening, organizing
The RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station and measures surface winds gathered data that showed newborn Tropical Storm Noul strengthening and organizing.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-May-2015
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2015
Law enforcement and national security agencies could benefit from an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology able to determine a person's age, race and gender with high fidelity.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-May-2015
AAPG Bulletin
Juvenile shale gas in Sweden
A new hydrogeochemical approach shows the juvenile age of shale gas.

Contact: F. Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 4-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Ocean currents disturb methane-eating bacteria
Bacteria that feed on methane can control its concentration once it is released from the ocean floor. This can potentially stop the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere. But ocean currents can easily disturb dinner, according to new study in Nature Geoscience.
Norwegian Research Council

Contact: Maja Sojtaric
maja.sojtaric@uit.no
CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment

Public Release: 4-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
India drift
MIT researchers explain mystery of India's rapid move toward Eurasia 80 million years ago.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-May-2015
Current Biology
Gigantic whales have stretchy 'bungee cord' nerves
University of British Columbia researchers have discovered a unique nerve structure in the mouth and tongue of rorqual whales that can double in length and then recoil like a bungee cord. The stretchy nerves explain how the massive whales are able to balloon an immense pocket between their body wall and overlying blubber to capture prey during feeding dives.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 4-May-2015
Current Biology
These gigantic whales have nerves like bungee cords
Nerves aren't known for being stretchy. In fact, 'nerve stretch injury' is a common form of trauma in humans. But researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 4 have discovered that nerves in the mouths and tongues of rorqual whales can more than double their length with no trouble at all.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean fronts improve climate and fishery production, study finds
A recent study by the University of Georgia found that ocean fronts -- separate regions of warm and cool water as well as salt and fresh water -- act to increase production in the ocean. Brock Woodson's research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed how fronts can be incorporated into current climate and fisheries models to account for small-scale interactions in fishery production and cycling of elements such as carbon and nitrogen in the ocean.

Contact: Brock Woodson
bwoodson@uga.edu
706-542-9574
University of Georgia

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Lousy sockeye are lousy competitors
With major funding from several groups, including NSERC, an SFU doctoral student has made a key discovery regarding Fraser River sockeye's vulnerability to sea lice. Their recently published research indicates that juvenile Fraser River sockeye salmon that are highly infected with sea lice are 20 percent less successful at consuming food than their lightly infected counterparts. The study appears online in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 1-May-2015
NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Quang making landfall in Western Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Quang as it was making landfall near Learmonth, Western Australia on May 1.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 281-290 out of 388.

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