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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 286-295 out of 306.

<< < 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Ocean acidification research should increase focus on species' ability to adapt
Not enough current research on marine ecosystems focuses on species' long-term adaptation to ocean acidification creating a murky picture of our ocean's future, according to an international study led by a University of British Columbia zoologist.

Contact: Jennifer Sunday
sunday@zoology.ubc.ca
604-789-1997
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Geological Society of America Bulletin
GSA Bulletin covers the US, Italy, Iran, Jamaica, Chile, and Argentina, and China
Learn more about river morphology in Oregon; coastal responses to sea level; the Tertiary Sabzevar Range, Iran; carbon-dioxide sequestration; fault systems in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica; Villarrica Volcano, Chile; landslide modeling; the southern Bighorn Arch, Wyoming; high-diversity plant fossil assemblages of the Salamanca Formation, Argentina; Upper Cretaceous strata, Western Interior Seaway; stratigraphy in Italy; the Soreq drainage, Israel; faulting in Surprise Valley, California; and the Qiantang River estuary, eastern China.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Geology
Is there an ocean beneath our feet?
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from the Earth's oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought. Seismologists at Liverpool have estimated that over the age of the Earth, the Japan subduction zone alone could transport the equivalent of up to three and a half times the water of all the Earth's oceans to its mantle.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
sarah.stamper@liv.ac.uk
01-517-943-044
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
University of Hawaii scientists make a big splash
Researchers from the University of Hawaii, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and University of California discovered that interplanetary dust particles could deliver water and organics to the Earth and other terrestrial planets. "It is a thrilling possibility that this influx of dust has acted as a continuous rainfall of little reaction vessels containing both the water and organics needed for the eventual origin of life on Earth and possibly Mars," said Hope Ishii, study co-author.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Scientists reveal why life got big in the Earth's early oceans
Why did life forms first begin to get larger and what advantage did this increase in size provide? UCLA biologists working with an international team of scientists examined the earliest communities of large multicellular organisms in the fossil record to help answer this question.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Island Biology 2014
Island Biology 2014: An International Conference on Island Evolution, Ecology, and Conservation
Islands are renowned for their extraordinary biota -- inspiring biologists and providing key insights into evolution, biogeography, and ecology. As a result of the devastating effects of human colonization, island ecosystems face severe threats, and island conservation has become a vital international concern. Examining a broad range of taxa, regions, and biological disciplines, attending biologists will share insights and develop collaborations to accelerate the pace and effectiveness of island research and conservation.

Contact: Donald Drake, University of Hawaii at Manoa
island.biology@gmail.com
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Palau's coral reefs surprisingly resistant to ocean acidification
Marine scientists working on the coral reefs of Palau have made two unexpected discoveries that could provide insight into corals' resistance and resilience to ocean acidification.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Nature
Analysis indicates that North and tropical Atlantic warming affects Antarctic climate
The gradual warming of the North and tropical Atlantic Ocean is contributing to climate change in Antarctica, a team of New York University scientists supported by the National Science Foundation has concluded.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Dissertations and Features
Arctic inland waters emit large amounts of carbon
Geoscientist Erik Lundin shows in his thesis that streams and lakes of Northern Sweden are hotspots for emissions of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. Erik defends his findings at Sweden's Umeň University on Friday, Jan. 31.

Contact: Erik Lundin
erik.lundin@emg.umu.se
46-070-516-6137
Umea University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Large and in charge
A NASA research group featuring University of Toronto Mississauga professor Marc Laflamme has helped to explain why some prehistoric organisms evolved into larger animals. Laflamme, an assistant professor with the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, and his colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Node of NASA's Astrobiology Institute suggest that height offered a distinct advantage to the earliest forms of multicellular life.
NASA

Contact: Gareth Trickey
gareth.trickey@utoronto.ca
905-828-3983
University of Toronto

Showing releases 286-295 out of 306.

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