Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 286-295 out of 406.

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Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seeps are microbial hotspots, homes to cosmopolitan microorganisms
New study provides evidence naturally occurring methane gas leaks in the sea floor vital to the microbial diversity are highly diverse themselves.

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan moving south and strengthening
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Nathan east of the Queensland coast on March 16 at 0:00 UTC. The image showed a rounded circulation with bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center of circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
WIREs Water
Will future population growth be limited by freshwater availability?
The global human population is growing faster than the water supply. Investigators recently analyzed various models and trends to assess both optimistic and pessimistic projections of future water use and shortages.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Tropical Cyclone Bavi moving through Philippine Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite captured visible and infrared data on Tropical Cyclone Bavi as it moved in a westward motion through the Philippine Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NASA sees Extra-Tropical Storm Pam moving away from New Zealand
Pam, a once powerful Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale is now an extra-tropical storm moving past northern New Zealand. NASA's Aqua satellite and the ISS-RapidScat instrument provided a look at the storm's structure and wind speed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
VIMS develops underwater robot to assist in oil-spill cleanup
Prototype developed by Dr. Paul Panetta and crew uses sound waves to help gauge thickness of slicks.
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Microbes in the seafloor: Little nutrients, lots of oxygen
About one-quarter of the global seafloor is extremely nutrient poor. Contrary to previous assumptions, it contains oxygen not just in the thin surface layer, but also throughout its entire thickness.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Neither more food nor better food -- still, fish biomass increases
To increase the biomass of fish, contemporary ecological theory predicts that either the amount of food or the quality of the food has to increase. In a recent experiment, researchers at Umeå University doubled the fish biomass under identical food supply and food quality by only controlling how much of total food supply that was channeled to juvenile and adult fish, respectively. The results have major implications for the exploitation (harvest) of fish populations and the coexistence of predatory fish and their prey.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-907-866-024
Umea University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
East Antarctica melting could be explained by oceanic gateways
Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica's largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery probably explains the glacier's extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise. Their research was published in the March 16 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation, Australian Antarctic Division, NASA, G. Unger Vetlesen Foundation, University of Texas at Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences

Contact: Monica Kortsha
mkortsha@jsg.utexas.edu
512-471-2241
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
NOAA announces novel feeder for juvenile and larval fish
NOAA Fisheries researchers have developed a fish feeder that allows fish farmers to automatically feed young fish on a recurrent basis while protecting the feed from oxidation and clumping. The patent-pending Microparticulate Feeder for Larval and Juvenile Fish was developed at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Wash., and is now available for licensing by a qualified US company.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Showing releases 286-295 out of 406.

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