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Video: Engineers are investigating the biomechanics of fish locomotion, in hopes of contributing to the next generation of robotic fish and underwater submersibles. See the video, from the National Science Foundation, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

August 10 to 15, 2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Sacramento, California

Underwater
The Ecological Society of America's 99th Annual Meeting "From Oceans to Mountains: It's all Ecology" will meet in Sacramento, Cal., from Sunday evening, August 10, to Friday morning, August 15, at the Sacramento Convention Center.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 291-300 out of 310.

<< < 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 > >>

Public Release: 7-May-2014
NASA watching year's first tropical low headed for southwestern Mexico
There's a tropical low pressure area in the Eastern Pacific Ocean today, about 8 days before the official Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-May-2014
New sensor array to monitor changing Gulf of Maine conditions and New England red tide
Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are kicking off an innovative NOAA-funded pilot program using robotic instruments and computer modeling analysis to shed light on changing ocean conditions in the Gulf of Maine as they relate to the harmful algal bloom phenomenon commonly known as the New England red tide.
NOAA, National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant Program, Tom and Robin Wheeler

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Global Change Biology
Phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass will decrease 6 percent and 11 percent due to climate change
It is estimated that ocean temperature warming will cause phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass to decrease by 6 percent and 11 percent respectively by the end of the century. A lower amount of these two main elements in the marine food web could reduce fish biomass in certain regions. These are some of the main conclusions drawn by research led by Azti-Tecnalia within the European MEECE project and recently published in the prestigious Global Change Biology Journal.

Contact: Irati Kortabitarte
i.kortabitarte@elhuyar.com
34-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Public Release: 7-May-2014
NASA sees system 91B making landfall in southwestern India
A tropical low was affecting southern India and Sri Lanka on May 6 at 0809 UTC when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM flew above it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-May-2014
BioScience
Native algae species to blame for 'rock snot' blooms in rivers worldwide
The recent blooms of the freshwater algae known as 'rock snot' on river bottoms worldwide are caused by a native species responding to changing environmental conditions rather than by accidental introductions by fishermen or the emergence of a new genetic strain as widely believed, a Dartmouth College-led study suggests.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Nature
Greenland melting due equally to global warming, natural variations
Up to half of the recent warming in Greenland and neighboring parts of the Canadian Arctic may be due to climate variations that originate in the tropical Pacific and are not connected with the overall warming of the planet. The other portion is likely due to global warming.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 6-May-2014
National Academy of Sciences elects Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies scientist
Jonathan Cole, a Distinguished Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Election to the Academy is one of the highest honors a scientist can achieve. Members, who are selected based on the merits of their research, serve as advisors to the nation on issues in science, engineering, and medicine.

Contact: Lori Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x121
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
The Red Sea -- an ocean like all others, after all
Actually, the Red Sea is an ideal study object for marine geologists. There they can observe the formation of an ocean in its early phase. However, the Red Sea seemed to go through a different birthing process than the other oceans. Now, Scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah were able to show that salt glaciers have distorted the previous models. The study was just published in the international journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

Contact: Jan Steffen
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Chemistry of Materials
Nanocellulose sponges to combat oil pollution
A new, absorbable material from Empa wood research could be of assistance in future oil spill accidents: a chemically modified nanocellulose sponge. The light material absorbs the oil spill, remains floating on the surface and can then be recovered. The absorbent can be produced in an environmentally-friendly manner from recycled paper, wood or agricultural by-products.

Contact: Rainer Klose
redaktion@empa.ch
41-587-654-733
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Predator-prey made simple
A team of UK researchers has developed a way to dramatically reduce the complexity of modeling 'bistable' systems which involve the interaction of two evolving species where one changes faster than the other -- 'slow-fast systems.' Described in the Journal of Chemical Physics, the work paves the way for easier computational simulations and predictions involving such systems, which are found in fields as diverse as chemistry, biology and ecology.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Showing releases 291-300 out of 310.

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