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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 296-305 out of 306.

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Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science
Bats use water ripples to hunt frogs
As the male tungara frog serenades females from a pond, he creates watery ripples that make him easier to target by rivals and predators such as bats. He will stop calling if he sees a bat overhead, but ripples continue moving for several seconds after the call ceases. In the study, researchers found evidence that bats use echolocation to detect these ripples and home in on a frog.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
eLife
Study says sharks/rays globally overfished
One quarter of the world's cartilaginous fish, namely sharks and rays, face extinction within the next few decades, according to the first study to systematically and globally assess their fate. The International Union for Conservation of Nature's Shark Specialist Group, co-chaired by Nick Dulvy, a Simon Fraser University Canada Research Chair in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation in British Columbia, conducted the study. It was published in eLife journal today.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Ecological Applications
War on lionfish shows first promise of success
It may take a legion of scuba divers armed with nets and spears, but a new study confirms for the first time that controlling lionfish populations in the western Atlantic Ocean can pave the way for a recovery of native fish. Scientists say there's finally a way to fight back.
National Science and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Stephanie Green
stephanie.green@science.oregonstate.edu
541-908-3839
Oregon State University

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
A guppy's spots formed by layers of color cells
At least three pigment cell types from multiple layers of skin contribute to the color patterns of male guppies.
Please see financial disclosure

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NASA still watching an amazingly stubborn, strong tropical low: System 94S
The tropical low pressure area known as System 94S continues to soak Australia and NASA satellites continue to track its movements.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Tropical cyclone lingling wraps up in Northwestern Pacific
After dropping rainfall that brought a number of casualties to the central and southern Philippines, the tropical cyclone known as Lingling, and locally as Agaton in the Philippines has finally wound down.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
ISME Journal
Predatory organisms at depth
In deep, old and nutrient-poor marine sediments there are up to 225 times more viruses than microbes. In such extreme habitats viruses make up the largest fraction of living biomass and take over the role as predators in this bizarre ecosystem.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Conservation Letters
Are anti-poaching efforts repeating the mistakes of the 'war on drugs'?
Illegal poaching, fueled by the demand for alternative "medicines" and luxury goods in Asian markets, continues unabated. In response unprecedented levels of funding are being invested in enforcement, while events such as China's public burning of confiscated ivory, serve to publicize the problem.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Micropredators dictate occurrence of deadly amphibian disease
Researchers have made progress in understanding the distribution of the deadly amphibian chytrid pathogen. In some regions, the deadly impact of the pathogen appears to be hampered by small predators, naturally occurring in freshwater bodies. These micropredators may efficiently reduce the number of free-swimming infectious stages (zoospores) by consuming them. This natural behavior will reduce the infection pressure on potential amphibian hosts. These results were published in the Cell Press journal Current Biology.
Biodiversa Project RACE, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Curtin researchers to hide our splashes from sharks
Curtin University researchers will attempt to "mask" the noise of swimmers from sharks after receiving a grant from the State Government's Shark Hazard Mitigation Strategy. The project will first look at characterizing noises produced from swimming, surfing and kayaking that are detectable by a number of large shark species. Researchers will then compare shark behavior when the human noises are detectable to when they are masked, to see if masking typical swimmer noises can be effective at disrupting detection of humans.
Shark Hazard Mitigation Strategy

Contact: Megan Meates
megan.meates@curtin.edu.au
61-892-644-4241
Curtin University

Showing releases 296-305 out of 306.

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