Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 31-40 out of 383.

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Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kujira move into the Gulf of Tonkin
Tropical Storm Kujira tracked over Hainan Island, China, and moved into the Gulf of Tonkin when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Scientists expect slightly below average Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' this summer
Scientists are expecting that this year's Chesapeake Bay hypoxic low-oxygen zone, also called the 'dead zone,' will be approximately 1.37 cubic miles -- about the volume of 2.3 million Olympic-size swimming pools. While still large, this is 10 percent lower than the long-term average as measured since 1950.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, University of Michigan, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
How will cold-loving Antarctic fish respond to warming ocean waters?
Climate change will be a real shock to Antarctic fishes' physiological systems, says Northeastern professor William Detrich. With a new NSF grant, he will study how rising ocean temperatures will affect the development of the embryos of these fish and the growth of juveniles after hatching.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jessica Caragher
j.caragher@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Scientific Reports
Survival of the gutless? Filter-feeders eject internal organs in response to stress
A recent Tel Aviv University study explores the ability of a common coral reef organism to eviscerate and regenerate its gut within 12 days and rebuild its filtration organ, the branchial sac, within 19 days. Understanding this process points to promising new directions in human soft tissue regeneration research.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Below-average 'dead zone' predicted for Chesapeake Bay in 2015
A University of Michigan researcher and his colleagues are forecasting a slightly below-average but still significant 'dead zone' this summer in the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary.

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Old-school literature search helps ecologist identify puzzling parasite
A months-long literature search that involved tracking down century-old scientific papers and translating others from Czech and French helped University of Michigan ecologist Meghan Duffy answer a question she'd wondered about for years.
National Science Foundation, U-M's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Single gene controls fish brain size and intelligence
A single gene called Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) drives brain size and intelligence in fish according to a new study by researchers at UCL, Stockholm University and University of Helsinki.

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Chaos
The physics of swimming fish
Fish may seem to glide effortlessly through the water, but the tiny ripples they leave behind are evidence of a constant give-and-take of energy between the swimmer and its aqueous environment -- a momentum exchange that propels the fish forward but is devilishly tricky to quantify. Now, new research shows that a fish's propulsion can be understood by studying vortices in the surrounding water as individual units instead of examining the flow as a whole.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
GSA 2015 Annual Meeting and Exposition
Baltimore hosts Earth Scientists, 1-4 November 2015
Registration is open for The Geological Society of America's Annual Meeting and Exposition, to be held 1 to 4 November 2015 at the Baltimore Convention Center in Baltimore, USA. Geoscientists from around the world, representing 37 disciplines, will present new findings that enlarge the body of geoscience knowledge and define directions for future study.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
NASA sees the wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Kujira
NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on Tropical Storm Kujira as it moved in a northerly direction in the South China Sea on June 22. Infrared data showed strongest convection was displaced from the center by vertical wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 31-40 out of 383.

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