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Showing releases 31-40 out of 354.

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Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
Tourism poses a threat to dolphins in the Balearic Islands
The rise in tourism, fishing and sea transport between the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands is compromising the wellbeing of a small population of common bottlenose dolphins living in coastal waters off the Pityusic Islands. This is the conclusion of a study led by the University of Barcelona, which has, for the first time, counted these mammals in summer and spring, which are crucial seasons for them.

Contact: SINC Team
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Current Biology
The story of a bizarre deep-sea bone worm takes an unexpected twist
Marine biologist Greg Rouse at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and his colleagues have discovered a new species of bizarre deep-sea worms that feast on the bones of dead animals. The new 'bone worm' was found to be an evolutionary reversal of size unseen in the animal kingdom.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, National Science Foundation, Faculty of Science at the University of Copenhagen.

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
NOAA, partners reveal first images of historic San Francisco shipwreck, SS City of Rio de Janeiro
NOAA and its partners today released 3-D sonar maps and images of an immigrant steamship lost more than 100 years ago in what many consider the worst maritime disaster in San Francisco history. On Feb. 22, 1901, in a dense morning fog, the SS City of Rio de Janeiro struck jagged rocks near the present site of the Golden Gate Bridge and sank almost immediately, killing 128 of the 210 passengers and crew aboard the ship.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Nature
New form of ice could help explore exciting avenues for energy production and storage
The discovery of a new form of ice could lead to an improved understanding of our planet's geology, potentially helping to unlock new solutions in the production, transportation and storage of energy. Ice XVI, the least dense of all known forms of ice, has a highly symmetric cage-like structure that can trap gaseous molecules to form compounds known as clathrates or gas hydrates.

Contact: James Romero
james@proofcommunication.com
44-845-680-1866
Institut Laue-Langevin

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Predator versus prey
California sheephead plays a vital role in the food web of kelp forests along the Pacific coast.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
NASA satellite data shows Hagupit dropped almost 19 inches of rainfall
Typhoon Hagupit soaked the Philippines, and a NASA rainfall analysis indicated the storm dropped almost 19 inches in some areas. After Hagupit departed the Philippines as a tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite passed over and captured a picture of the storm curled up like a cat waiting to pounce when it landfalls in Vietnam on Dec. 11.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
ZooKeys
Ancient creature discovered in the depths of the Arctic Ocean
An extraordinary animal has been discovered more than 1.5 miles (2.5 km) below the ocean surface off the coast of northern Alaska, USA. The new species is a type of bivalve mollusk (clams, mussels, oysters etc.). Age estimates place the new clam as living more than 1.8 million years ago to the near present, but scientists can't discount that it might still be alive today. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Paul Valentich-Scott
pvscott@sbnature2.org
805-682-4711 x146
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Progress in Oceanography
Climate change projected to drive species northward
Anticipated changes in climate will push West Coast marine species from sharks to salmon northward an average of 30 kilometers per decade, shaking up fish communities and shifting fishing grounds, according to a new study published in the journal Progress in Oceanography.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists estimate the total weight of plastic floating in the world's oceans
Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution may be floating in the world's oceans.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geology
The legend of the kamikaze typhoons
In the late 13th Century, Kublai Khan, ruler of the Mongol Empire, launched one of the world's largest armada of its time in an attempt to conquer Japan. Early narratives describe the decimation and dispersal of these fleets by the 'kamikaze' of 1274 and 1281 CE -- a pair of intense typhoons divinely sent to protect Japan from invasion.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
303-357-1057
Geological Society of America

Showing releases 31-40 out of 354.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>