Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 31-40 out of 392.

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Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
A $5,000 idea blossomed into a $300,000 algae research and innovation accelerator
A one-stop shopping facility for algal research and development, the Maine Algal Research and Innovation Accelerator, MARIA, will be constructed on the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences campus in East Boothbay this spring. MARIA will initially be used to develop better fatty acid products for a variety of medical conditions. The Maine Institute of Technology provided startup funds. The Maine Community Foundation is providing funds for the construction project and scaling up of activity.
Maine Technology Institute, Maine Community Foundation

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
NASA sees changes in Tropical Cyclone Fantala
Once a powerful Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale, Tropical Cyclone Fantala continues to move north of Madagascar on April 21. NASA's Terra satellite and GPM satellite passed over the storm finding heavy rainfall, a clouded eye, and vertical wind shear affecting the storm as it turned in its track.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
101st Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America comes to southern Florida
Environmental scientists will gather in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Aug. 7-12, 2016 for the 101st Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. The meeting theme 'Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene' invites conversation on the new relationships between species arising under the influence of global change as a backdrop for 2,000 presentations of breaking research and ecological concepts at the Greater Fort Lauderdale/ Broward County Convention Center.

Contact: Liza Lester
LLester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Freshwater Science
Crayfish may help restore dirty streams, Stroud study finds
While macroinvertebrates are a tasty food source for crayfish, a new study reveals a surprising finding: when crayfish were present in in-stream experimental enclosures, macroinvertebrate density was higher, not lower.

Contact: Melinda Daniels, Ph.D.
mdaniels@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x268
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
EGU 2016: European Geosciences Union General Assembly
Earth System Dynamics
1.5 C vs 2 C global warming: New study shows why half a degree matters
European researchers found substantially different climate change impacts for global warming of 1.5°C and 2°C by 2100, the two temperature limits of the Paris climate agreement. The additional 0.5°C would mean a 10-cm-higher global sea-level rise, longer heat waves, and would result in virtually all tropical coral reefs being at risk. The research is published today in Earth System Dynamics, an European Geosciences Union journal, and is presented at the EGU General Assembly.

Contact: Barbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Science
Microscopic 'clocks' time distance to source of galactic cosmic rays
Most of the galactic cosmic rays reaching Earth come from nearby clusters of massive stars, according to new observations from NASA's ACE spacecraft. The distance between the cosmic rays' point of origin and Earth is limited by the survival of a radioactive isotope of iron, Fe-60, which has a half life of 2.6 million years. These tiny clocks indicate there was a source within spitting distance of Earth within the past few million years.

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Science
Better data needed to stop sixth mass extinction
To prevent a new mass extinction of the world's animal and plant life, we need to understand the threats to biodiversity, where they occur and how quickly change is happening. For this to happen, we need reliable and accessible data. A new study published in Science today reveals those data are largely missing. We are lacking key information on important threats to biodiversity such as invasive species, logging, bush meat harvesting, and illegal wildlife trade.

Contact: Tanya Petersen
tpetersen@wwfint.org
41-799-122-447
World Wildlife Fund

Public Release: 20-Apr-2016
NASA sees birth of Tropical Cyclone 20P, threatens American Samoa
As Tropical Cyclone 20P formed in the Southern Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed storm cloud top temperatures while the RapidScat instrument looked at surface winds. The National Weather Service in Pago Pago expects the tropical storm to affect American Samoa by the weekend.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Apr-2016
This Week from AGU: Erosion by fire, aurora sightings, and 2 new research papers
This week from AGU are articles on erosion by fire, aurora sightings, and two new research papers.

Contact: Lauren Lipuma
llipuma@agu.org
202-777-7396
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 20-Apr-2016
NASA sees Fantala's eye wide open north of Madagascar
Tropical Cyclone Fantala continued to spin northeast of Madagascar when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on April 20.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 31-40 out of 392.

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