Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 321-330 out of 486.

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Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Mass extinction event from South Africa's Karoo
An international team led by researchers from the Evolutionary Studies Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has obtained an age from rocks of the Great Karoo that shed light on the timing of a mass extinction event that occurred around 260 million years ago.

Contact: Erna van Wyk
erna.vanwyk@wits.ac.za
27-117-174-023
University of the Witwatersrand

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Everything you need to know about coastal engineering -- international compendium published
Coastal and ocean engineers can now look forward to new research reading material compiled in a single compendium. Published by World Scientific, the 'International Compendium of Coastal Engineering' aims to provide a comprehensive overview of coastal engineering from basic theory to engineering practice.

Contact: Jason CJ
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NASA sees Nangka become a typhoon
Tropical Storm Nangka strengthened to a typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean just after NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on July 6.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NASA's infrared look at strengthening Typhoon Chan-Hom
During the early morning hours on July 6, Chan-Hom was a strong tropical storm. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very powerful thunderstorms that hinted at intensification, and later in the day, Chan-Hom became a typhoon.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Tel Aviv/Tsinghua University project uses crowd computing to improve water filtration
A joint research project by Tel Aviv University and Tsinghua University proposes a novel nanotechnology-based strategy to improve water filtration. The project, initiated by IBM's World Community Grid, was an experiment in crowdsourced computing -- carried out by over 150,000 volunteers who contributed their own computing power to the research.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Linfa exiting northern Philippines
Tropical Storm Linfa moved over Luzon in the northern Philippines over July 4 and by early July 5, NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm moving into the South China Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Science
Seahorse tails could inspire new generation of robots
Inspiration for the next big technological breakthrough in robotics, defense systems and biomedicine could come from a seahorse's tail, according to a new study reported Thursday in the journal Science. The research centers on the curious shape of seahorse tails and was led by Clemson University's Michael M. Porter, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

Contact: Michael Porter
mmporte@clemson.edu
864-656-1307
Clemson University

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Depression 10W's most powerful storms
Infrared date from NASA's Aqua satellite spotted the strongest storms within newborn Tropical Depression 10W over the Philippine Sea today, July 2.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
NASA sees 2 tropical cyclones on either side of the equator
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over two tropical cyclones in the Pacific Ocean on different sides of the equator today, July 2.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Deep Sea Research II
The very hungry sea anemone
The surprising culinary preferences of an abyssal sea anemone have been unveiled by a team of scientists from the National Oceanography Centre. New time-lapse photography of the abyssal sea floor shows that this type of anemone can eat animals up to six times its weight and moves around the ocean floor by burrowing. The lead author of this study, Jennifer Durden, a Ph.D. student at the NOC, explained that these heavy meals can take the anemone up to 80 hours to digest.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Showing releases 321-330 out of 486.

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