Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 321-330 out of 390.

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Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
New fossil rattles Moby Dick's family tree
An international team of scientists, led by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's Curator of Marine Mammals Dr. Jorge Velez-Juarbe, has discovered a new species of an extinct pigmy sperm whale from Panama that clarifies key aspects of the evolution of the sperm whale.

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Rare sperm whale fossils discovered in Panama
Rare fossils from extinct pygmy sperm whales found in Panama indicate the bone involved in sound generation and echolocation, the spermaceti organ, reduced in size throughout the whales' evolution.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Dive discovers missing aircraft hangar of sunken WW II-era Japanese submarine
A recent survey of newly discovered submarine wreck successfully located, mapped and captured on video for the first time not only the submarine's hangar and conning tower (navigation platform), and the submarine's bell. The massive aircraft hangar, large enough to launch three float-plane bombers, was the defining feature of the I-400.

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bigger bang for your buck: Restoring fish habitat by removing barriers
A new study from a multidisciplinary team, published April 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describes a powerful new model to help decision makers maximize the cost-effectiveness of barrier removal projects that also restore migratory fish habitat.

Contact: Tom Neeson
neeson@wisc.edu
608-262-3088
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Burmese python habitat use patterns may help control efforts
The largest and longest Burmese python tracking study of its kind -- here or in its native range -- is providing researchers and resource managers new information that may help target control efforts of this invasive snake, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Geology
New study shows parrotfish are critical to coral reef island building
As well as being a beautiful species capable of changing its colour, shape and even gender, new research published today shows that parrotfish, commonly found on healthy coral reefs, can also play a pivotal role in providing the sands necessary to build and maintain coral reef islands.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
UT research uncovers lakes, signs of life under Antarctica's dry valleys
Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change. Jill Mikucki, a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, microbiology assistant professor, was part of a team that detected extensive salty groundwater networks in Antarctica using a novel airborne electromagnetic mapping sensor system called SkyTEM.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lola Alapo
lalapo@utk.edu
865-974-3993
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate
Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming. It has been proposed that such disastrous climate effects could be offset by technological approaches. One such proposal is to artificially whiten the surface of the Arctic Ocean in order to increase the reflection of the sun's energy into space and restore sea ice.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows
Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
PeerJ
Endangered corals smothered by sponges on overfished Caribbean reefs
For reef-building corals, sponges do not make good neighbors. Aggressive competitors for space, sponges use toxins, mucus, shading, and smothering to kill adjacent coral colonies and then grow on their skeletons. A recent survey of coral reefs across the Caribbean shows that overfishing removes the predators of sponges, greatly increasing the threat of fast-growing sponges to an already diminished population of corals.

Contact: Joseph Pawlik
pawlikj@uncw.edu
910-962-2377
PeerJ

Showing releases 321-330 out of 390.

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