Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 321-330 out of 393.

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Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Nature
Low-oxygen 'dead zones' in North Pacific linked to past ocean warming
A new study has found a link between abrupt ocean warming at the end of the last ice age and the sudden onset of low-oxygen, or hypoxic, conditions that led to vast marine dead zones. Results of the research, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, are published today in the journal Nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
NASA sees In-Fa get better organized, re-strengthen
When the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission of GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Storm In-fa, data showed the storm had become better organized over the previous 24 hours. After GPM, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image that confirmed a better-organized storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Current Biology
Polarization vision gives fiddler crabs the edge in detecting rivals
Fiddler crabs use polarization vision to sense the approach of rivals, scientists at the University of Bristol have found. The research, carried out in Panama, is the first field-based evidence that animals use polarization vision to enhance the detection of objects.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
001-179-288-896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite eyes Tropical Storm Rick in Eastern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rick and captured a visible light image that showed the storm far off the coast of western Mexico. Rick continued to hang on to its status as tropical storm on Nov. 20, although a minimal one.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Substantial funding for DFG Transregional CRC on 'Arctic Climate Change'
The German Research Foundation (DFG) supports the new Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172 'Arctic climate change' during the next four years.
German Research Foundation, Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172, ArctiC Amplification Climate Relevant Atmospheric and SurfaCe Processes, Feedback Mechanisms:(AC)

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@tropos.de
49-341-271-77189
Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS)

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Ecological Indicators
Climate change: Warm water is mixing up life in the Arctic
The warming of arctic waters in the wake of climate change is likely to produce radical changes in the marine habitats of the High North. This is indicated by data from long-term observations in the Fram Strait, which researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute have now analyzed.

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Nature
Acorn worm genome reveals gill origins of human pharynx
One of the defining characteristics of chordates and other deuterostomes is the presence of gill slits, which first appeared in the acorn worm and persist vestigially in the human embryo. An international team led by UC Berkeley sequenced the genomes of two acorn worms to understand the genes that control development and the nervous system, and found a conserved cluster of six genes involved in patterning the pharynx in the worm as well as vertebrates.
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-915-3097
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
2015 AGU Fall Meeting
AGU Fall Meeting: Virtual press room and PIO uploader -- now live!
Discover the latest Earth and space science news at the 48th annual AGU Fall Meeting.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
PLOS Genetics
Sequencing algae's genome may aid biofuel production
University of Washington scientists have sequenced the complete genetic makeup of a species of ecologically important algae, which may aid in biofuel production.
United States Department of Energy, Washington Sea Grant, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Tropical Storm Rick joins an elite late-season storm group
The twenty-first tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season strengthened into a tropical storm on Nov. 19 and was renamed Tropical Storm Rick bringing the storm into a small elite group of late-season storms. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an early daylight image of the storm that showed it had become more organized since it formed on Nov 18.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 321-330 out of 393.

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