Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 326-335 out of 382.

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Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
Three new technologies to make energy cleaner, more efficient
PNNL and its partners are developing three new technologies to improve the power grid, make biofuel from seaweed and produce hydrogen with grants from DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, or ARPA-E.
US Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
Nature Communications
A sticky breakthrough
In an important step toward creating a practical underwater glue, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have designed a synthetic material that combines the key functionalities of interfacial mussel foot proteins, creating a single, low-molecular-weight, one-component adhesive.

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
NASA's GPM gets a look at newborn, late season Eastern Pacific Tropical Storm Sandra
During the early morning of Nov. 24, Tropical Storm Sandra became the 18th named storm of the 2015 Eastern Pacific hurricane season. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite passed over the new storm and looked at its clouds and rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Annabelle dying bursts
Tropical Cyclone Annabelle ran into adverse atmospheric and oceanic conditions and was fading quickly on Nov. 24. But the day before, NASA's RapidScat instrument saw some dying bursts of wind from the weakening Southern Indian Ocean system.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
NASA's GPM finds extreme rainfall in Typhoon In-fa
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission known as GPM passed over Typhoon In-fa and found extreme rainfall occurring in the storm. GPM is a satellite that can estimate rainfall rates from space. It's a jointly managed satellite by both NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
Journal of Herpetological Medicine and Surgery
Leatherback sea turtles choose nest sites carefully, study finds
The enormous, solitary leatherback sea turtle spends most of its long life at sea. After hatching and dispersing across the world's oceans, only the female leatherbacks return to their natal beaches to lay clutches of eggs in the sand. A new study offers fresh insights into their nesting choices and will help efforts to prevent the extinction of this globally endangered giant of the sea, researchers said.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Coming out of their evolutionary shells
Corresponding author and Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues, in a study published in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, performed the first comprehensive study of the genes that control the hard cutaneous layers of the shell in the North American painted turtle and other turtles.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
MBEpress@gmail.com
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Big data reveals glorious animation of Antarctic bottom water
A remarkably detailed animation of the movement of the densest and coldest water in the world around Antarctica has been produced using data generated on Australia's most powerful supercomputer, Raijin.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
Chapman University professor is Regional Coordinator for €3 million European Union Grant
Chapman University associate professor Hesham El-Askary, Ph.D., is the regional coordinator on a €3 million grant from the European Union's Horizon 2020. The work of Dr. El-Askary and his colleagues will focus on earth observation related research with the aim of providing timely and accurate information, forecasts and projections.
European Union

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 23-Nov-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Typhoon In-fa stretching
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon In-fa on Nov. 23 and imagery showed the storm had become elongated to the northeast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 326-335 out of 382.

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