Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 331-340 out of 491.

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Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Current Biology
Human activities, shifts in local species reshaping coastal biodiversity
While human activities have caused extinctions across the globe, your favorite beach or diving site may actually be home to as many, or more, species then it was a few decades ago. That's the conclusion of a synthesis of 50 years of marine biodiversity data conducted by University of British Columbia researchers.

Contact: Silvia Moreno-Garcia
silvia.moreno-garcia@science.ubc.ca
604-827-5001
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science
Global sea levels have risen 6 meters or more with just slight global warming
A new review analyzing three decades of research on the historic effects of melting polar ice sheets found that global sea levels have risen at least six meters, or about 20 feet, above present levels on multiple occasions over the past three million years. What is most concerning is that amount of melting was caused by an increase of only 1-2 degrees (Celsius) in global mean temperatures.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anders Carlson
acarlson@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-3625
Oregon State University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science
Managing mining of the deep seabed
The International Seabed Authority is meeting on July 15 to decide on a regulatory framework for mining in the deep-sea floor. In a paper published this week in Science, researchers from the Center for Ocean Solutions and co-authors from leading institutions around the world propose a strategy for balancing commercial extraction of deep-sea resources with protection of diverse seabed habitats.

Contact: Kristi Boosman
kboosman@stanford.edu
650-850-1136
Center for Ocean Solutions

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Coral Reefs
New study showed spawning frequency regulates species population networks on coral reefs
New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species' network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
GSA Bulletin
New database documents submarine landslides
Submarine landslides, also known as mass transport deposits (MTDs), are common in marine environments and pose risks to coastal communities and offshore infrastructure. This new 332-point database presented by Lorena Moscardelli and Lesli Wood is drawn from studies of multiple MTDs around the world. Understanding these MTDS, they write, will help determine the extent of ancient submarine landslides and contribute to the development geo-models for forecasting future submarine slides.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
NASA sees powerful winds around Typhoon Nangka's center
The RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station measured Typhoon Nangka's powerful winds as it continues to move through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Linfa approaching southeastern China coast
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a bird's eye view of Tropical Storm Linfa as it was approaching the southeastern China coast on July 8.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Typhoon Chan-Hom 'eyes' NASA's Aqua satellite
Typhoon Chan-Hom's eye was visible from space when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on July 8, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
New tropical depression forms and moves into central Pacific Ocean
Tropical Depression 4E formed in the Eastern Pacific and crossed the 140 West longitude line as of the 0300 UTC time, which brought it into the central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Environmental Engineering Science
New study shows that oil from surface-spill slicks can sink to sea floor
A first of its kind study that modeled oil slick weathering over time in a laboratory setting provides evidence that evaporation combined with sinking of the heavy components of surface-spill slicks can explain the presence of oil on the sea floor. This critical proof-of-concept addresses the ongoing controversy regarding the large amounts of oil found at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico and will impact future oil slick modeling and clean-up strategies. The study is published in Environmental Engineering Science.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Showing releases 331-340 out of 491.

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