Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 331-340 out of 385.

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Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes in body of the ocean
For decades, doctors have developed methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
NASA sees post-Tropical Cyclone Norbert fading near Baja California
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Norbert on Sept. 7 before it weakened to a post- tropical storm. The AIRS instrument aboard captured infrared data that showed a 'sliver' of strong thunderstorms remained around the center of the waning storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Restoration Ecology
Study puts some mussels into Bay restoration
Research in Chesapeake Bay shows that the mussels that typically colonize a restored oyster reef can more than double the reef's overall filtration capacity.
Oyster Recovery Partnership

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Media event: GM awards Carnegie's BioEYES environmental education grant
The General Motors Corporation is presenting a $5,000.00 award to Carnegie's BioEYES K-12 educational program on Sept. 11, 2014, to deliver a two-week environmental curriculum, Your Watershed, Your Backyard. The event will start at 11:45 a.m., at GM's Baltimore Operations, 10301 Philadelphia Rd., White Marsh, Md.
General Motors Corporation

Contact: Chandra Harvey
harvey@ciwemb.edu
410-246-3004
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Current Biology
Fish as good as chimpanzees at choosing the best partner for a task
Latest research shows that coral trout can now join chimpanzees as the only non-human species that can choose the right situation and the right partner to get the best result when collaboratively working.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Current Biology
Coral trout pick their collaborators carefully
Coral trout not only work with moray eels to improve their chances of a meal, but they can also be choosy when it comes to picking the best moray partner. The findings reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. 8 show that such sophisticated collaborative abilities are not limited to apes and humans. The fish's behavior is remarkable in other ways too, the researchers say.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Frontiers in Microbiology
Like weeds of the sea, 'brown tide' algae exploit nutrient-rich coastlines
A new study by researchers at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Stony Brook University highlights up close the survival skills that have made Aureococcus anophagefferens the bane of fishermen, boaters and real-estate agents. Building on previous mapping of Aureococcus' genome, the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology this summer,confirms that the genes previously hypothesized to help Aureococcus survive in murky nutrient-rich waters, switch on in conditions typical of estuaries degraded by human activity.
US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research, a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Marine Mammal Science
California blue whales rebound from whaling, first of their kin to do so
The number of California blue whales has rebounded to near historical levels, according to new research by the University of Washington, and while the number of blue whales struck by ships is likely above allowable US limits, such strikes do not immediately threaten that recovery.
Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Research shows declining levels of acidity in Sierra Nevada lakes
A team led by an environmental scientist at the University of California, Riverside has conducted research on lakes in the Sierra Nevada -- the most sensitive lakes in the US to acid rain, according to the Environmental Protection Agency -- and described human impacts on them during the 20th century. The conclusion is the overall news is good: Air quality regulation has benefited aquatic ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada; controlling air pollution is benefiting nature in California.
National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, National Science Foundation, University of California, Geological Society of America

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes within the body of the ocean
For decades, medical researchers have sought new methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Showing releases 331-340 out of 385.

<< < 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 > >>