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Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 331-340 out of 397.

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Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
International Journal on Life in Oceans and Coastal Waters
Genetics provides new clues about lionfish invasion
New genetic data suggest the red lionfish invasion in the Caribbean Basin and Western Atlantic started in multiple locations, not just one as previously believed, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters
Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying to communicate over the sounds of ship traffic or other sources.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Are our fisheries laws working? Just ask about gag grouper
Gag grouper is the 37th stock to be rebuilt since 2000, according to the NOAA Fisheries' 2014 Status of Stocks report.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
How oil damages fish hearts: Five years of research since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Scientists have shown that toxic compounds in oil target the still-forming hearts of larval fish, leading to developmental defects and reduced survival.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Thawing permafrost feeds climate change
Assistant Professor of Oceanography Robert Spencer writes in Geophysical Research Letters that single-cell organisms called microbes are rapidly devouring the ancient carbon being released from thawing permafrost soil and ultimately releasing it back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Increased carbon dioxide levels, of course, cause the Earth to warm and accelerate thawing.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Science
Study: Photosynthesis has unique isotopic signature
Photosynthesis leaves behind a unique calling card, a chemical signature that is spelled out with stable oxygen isotopes, according to a new study in Science. The findings suggest isotopic signatures could exist for many biological and geological processes, including some that are difficult to observe with current tools.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Deep Carbon Observatory

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, Titan's atmosphere
This week from AGU: articles on undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, and Titan's atmosphere.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
914-552-5759
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
DNA of bacteria crucial to ecosystem defies explanation
The genome of an important bacteria contains far more 'junk DNA' than scientists expected -- making its genome more closely resemble that of a higher lifeform.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
UNH researchers discover new method to detect most common bacteria contaminating oysters
In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and sickened consumers who ate the contaminated shellfish. The new patent-pending detection method - which is available for immediate use to identify contaminated shellfish -- is a significant advance in efforts to identify shellfish harboring disease-carrying strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, US Department of Agriculture, NH Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation EPSCoR

Contact: Lori Wright
lori.wright@unh.edu
603-862-1452
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil
A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. In May 2014, a group of recreational divers spotted an adult lionfish -- the voracious invader Pterois volitans -- in the rocky reefs of southeastern Brazil.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 331-340 out of 397.

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