Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 331-340 out of 377.

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Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Marine and Freshwater Research
White sharks grow more slowly and mature much later than previously thought
A new study on white sharks in the western North Atlantic indicates they grow more slowly and mature much later than previously thought. The findings, published online in Marine and Freshwater Research, present the first reliable growth curve for this species in the western North Atlantic. The results: males are sexually mature around age 26 and females around age 33, much later than currently accepted estimates of 4-10 years for males and 7-13 years for females.
National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Satellite images reveal ocean acidification from space
Pioneering techniques that use satellites to monitor ocean acidification are set to revolutionize the way that marine biologists and climate scientists study the ocean. This new approach, that will be published Feb. 17, 2015 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, offers remote monitoring of large swathes of inaccessible ocean from satellites that orbit the Earth some 700 km above our heads.
European Space Agency

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones
New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. The research reveals many of these genes, which when mutated in humans can lead to neurological disease, first evolved in the common ancestor of people and a group of animals that includes jellyfish, coral, and sea anemones.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Current Biology
Molecular evidence for the loss of 3 basic tastes in penguins
A University of Michigan-led study of penguin genetics has concluded that the flightless aquatic birds lost three of the five basic vertebrate tastes -- sweet, bitter and the savory, meaty taste known as umami -- more than 20 million years ago and never regained them.
National Institutes of Health, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Wuhan University

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Current Biology
Genetic evidence shows penguins have 'bad taste'
Penguins apparently can't enjoy or even detect the savory taste of the fish they eat or the sweet taste of fruit. A new analysis of the genetic evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Feb. 16 suggests that the flightless, waddling birds have lost three of the five basic tastes over evolutionary time. For them, it appears, food comes in only two flavors: salty and sour.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Feb-2015
Ecology Letters
Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water
Scientists studying arthropods, the group of cold-blooded animals that includes crabs and insects, have found that individuals within species living on land tend to grow to a larger size in the warm and nearer the equator, but that the reverse is true of species found in water.

Contact: Will Hoyles
w.hoyles@qmul.ac.uk
07-772-512-519
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Thames study: Rivers can be a source antibiotic resistance
Rivers and streams could be a major source of antibiotic resistance in the environment. The discovery comes following a study on the Thames river by scientists at the University of Warwick's School of Life Sciences and the University of Exeter Medical School. The study found that greater numbers of resistant bacteria exist close to some waste water treatment works, and that these plants are likely to be responsible for at least half of the increase observed.
Natural Environment Research Council, European Science Foundation, Eureopean Regional Development Fund

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-765-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
SICB Annual Meeting 2015
Remoras don't suck
Researchers have long studied animals like tree frogs, geckos, and spiders for their adhesive abilities, but what makes remoras unique in this group is they combine three key elements: the ability to securely fasten themselves for long periods of time; attach to different types of surfaces; release quickly without harming the surface.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
eLife
Make like a squid and transform
A new study from Tel Aviv University showcases the first example of an animal editing its own genetic makeup on-the-fly to modify most of its proteins, enabling adjustments to its immediate surroundings.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientific Reports
High seas fishing ban could boost global catches, equality
Analysis of fisheries data indicates that if increased spillover of fish stocks from protected international waters were to boost coastal catches by 18 per cent, current global catches would be maintained. When the researchers modeled less conservative estimates of stock spillover, catches in coastal waters surpassed current global levels.
Global Ocean Commission, OceanCanada, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Pew Charitable Trusts, Conservation International

Contact: Rashid Sumaila
r.sumaila@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-351-7406
University of British Columbia

Showing releases 331-340 out of 377.

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