Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 341-350 out of 388.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
UNH researchers discover new method to detect most common bacteria contaminating oysters
In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and sickened consumers who ate the contaminated shellfish. The new patent-pending detection method - which is available for immediate use to identify contaminated shellfish -- is a significant advance in efforts to identify shellfish harboring disease-carrying strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, US Department of Agriculture, NH Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation EPSCoR

Contact: Lori Wright
lori.wright@unh.edu
603-862-1452
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil
A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. In May 2014, a group of recreational divers spotted an adult lionfish -- the voracious invader Pterois volitans -- in the rocky reefs of southeastern Brazil.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Majorities in Arctic nations favor cooperation with Russia despite Ukraine; conflict worries rise
Commissioned by the Gordon Foundation of Toronto and Institute of the North, Anchorage, a survey of 10,000 respondents in countries with Arctic territory reveals major differences of opinion on issues ranging from Arctic co-operation with Russia to the threat of military conflict north of the 60th parallel, to whether the Northwest Passage is a Canadian or international waterway. Tables of the survey results are here: http://bit.ly/1P5a8QI.
The Gordon Foundation / Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program, Institute of the North

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
The Gordon Foundation

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Calculating how the Pacific was settled
Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, a University of Utah anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Ecosphere
Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef
New research shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish populations of the Great Barrier Reef. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that removing predatory fish such as coral trout and snapper, through fishing, causes significant changes to the make-up of the reef's fish populations.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phytoplankton, reducing greenhouse gases or amplifying Arctic warming?
Scientists with Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, and Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, presented on Monday, April 20, in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences online, the geophysical impact of phytoplankton that triggers positive feedback in the Arctic warming when the warming-induced melting of sea ice stimulates phytoplankton growth. The paper is titled 'Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.'
Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of Korea, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Ms. YunMee Jung
postech-pr@postech.ac.kr
82-054-279-2417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Extending climate predictability beyond El Niño
Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists from the USA, Australia, and Japan. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers.

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Deep Sea Research II - Topical Studies in Oceanography
Let it snow
Before Deepwater Horizon, scientists didn't know that oil and marine snow had anything to do with each other.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Geoscience
Ocean currents impact methane consumption
Offshore the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago, methane is seeping out of the seabed in several hundred meters depth. Luckily, bacteria are consuming a large proportion of the methane before it is released to the atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. An interdisciplinary study conducted by researchers at the University of Basel and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel could now show that ocean currents can have a strong impact on methane removal. The renowned journal Nature Geoscience has published the study.

Contact: Jan Steffen
jsteffen@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
PLOS Biology
Pruning of blood vessels: Cells can fuse with themselves
Cells of the vascular system of vertebrates can fuse with themselves. This process, which occurs when a blood vessel is no longer necessary and pruned, has now been described on the cellular level by Professor Markus Affolter from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. The findings of this study have been published in the journal PLOS Biology.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Showing releases 341-350 out of 388.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>