Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 341-350 out of 482.

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Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Retreating sea ice linked to changes in ocean circulation, could affect European climate
Retreating sea ice in the Iceland and Greenland Seas may be changing the circulation of warm and cold water in the Atlantic Ocean, and could ultimately impact the climate in Europe, says a new study by an atmospheric physicist from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) and his colleagues in Great Britain, Norway and the United States.

Contact: Nicolle Wahl
nicolle.wahl@utoronto.ca
905-569-4656
University of Toronto

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
CCNY researchers develop eco-friendly oil spill solution
City College of New York researchers led by chemist George John have developed an eco-friendly biodegradable green 'herding' agent that can be used to clean up light crude oil spills on water.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
Why are seabirds abandoning their ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California?
A group of researchers from Mexico and the United States has found that warming oceanographic conditions and fishing pressure are driving nesting seabirds away from their ancestral breeding ground in Mexico into California harbors.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A 'hydrothermal siphon' drives water circulation through the seafloor
Vast quantities of ocean water circulate through the seafloor, flowing through the volcanic rock of the upper oceanic crust. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, published June 26 in Nature Communications, explains what drives this global process and how the flow is sustained.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Endangered Species Research
A tale of two whales
A new study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego indicates a steady population trend for blue whales and an upward population trend for fin whales in Southern California.
Office of Naval Research, Chief of Naval Operations N45, US Pacific Fleet

Contact: Brittany Hook or Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Heredity
Starfish that clone themselves live longer
Starfish that reproduce through cloning avoid ageing to a greater extent than those that propagate through sexual reproduction. This is shown by a new research study in which researchers from the University of Gothenburg participated. The study has recently been published in the highly respected journal Heredity.

Contact: Carina Eliasson
carina.eliasson@gu.se
46-317-869-873
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Heat-tolerant genes may rescue corals from increasing temperatures
The reef-building coral, Acropora millepora, can pass its tolerance for heat on to the next generation via its DNA, according to a new study.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Corals are already adapting to global warming, scientists say
Some coral populations already have genetic variants necessary to tolerate warm ocean waters, and humans can help to spread these genes, a team of scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and Oregon State University have found.
National Science Foundation, Australian Institute of Marine Science

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Depression Kujira at landfall
Tropical Depression Kujira made landfall in northeastern Vietnam early on June 24 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 341-350 out of 482.

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