Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 341-350 out of 440.

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Public Release: 27-May-2015
Environmental Microbiology
Pinpointing natural cancer drug's true origins brings sustainable production a step closer
For decades, scientists have known that ET-743, a compound extracted from a marine invertebrate called a mangrove tunicate, can kill cancer cells. The drug has been approved for use in patients in Europe and is in clinical trials in the US.
International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups, Fogarty International Center, National Science Foundation, DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Contact: Ian Demsky
idemsky@umich.edu
734-647-9837
University of Michigan

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force releases National Invasive Lionfish Management Plan
An intergovernmental task force just released a new plan to prevent the spread of the invasive lionfish and to help manage lionfish in an effort to prevent further harm to marine ecosystems.

Contact: Connie Barclay
Connie.barclay@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Nature
Invisible helpers of the sea: Marine bacteria boost growth of tiny ocean algae
A common diatom grows faster in the presence of bacteria that release a growth hormone known to benefit plants on land.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Scientific Reports
On the trail of the clever snail
Animals, like humans, excel at some tasks but not others according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports. Researchers from the Universities of Exeter and Aberystwyth used pond snails to investigate learning and memory. They found that if an individual is good at forming memories about food they are poor at forming memories related to predator threat and vice versa.
Leverhulme Trust

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Protecting South America's iconic golden dorado fish
A new study launched this month by University of Massachusetts Amherst fisheries biologist Andy J. Danylchuk, in collaboration with Argentina's Ministry of Environment and regional partners including Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio, Fish Simply, and Patagonia Inc., is the first to assess the impact of catch-and-release fishing and other human and environmental pressures on the golden dorado, a fish of high economic and recreational value across South America.
Patagonia, Inc., Argentina's Ministry of Environment, Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio and Fish Simply

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Wrasse project offers production boost to Scottish salmon industry
Aquaculture experts from the University of Stirling, Scotland, are leading the research behind a £4 million project to boost production in the Scottish salmon farming industry. Scientists from the University's internationally acclaimed Institute of Aquaculture have helped to develop the potential of wrasse, a cleaner fish which supports the efficient production of salmon. Stirling researchers are using wrasse as part of a sustainable, integrated pest management strategy.
Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, Marine Harvest, Scottish Sea Farms, BioMar, University of Stirling

Contact: David Christie
david.christie1@stir.ac.uk
01-786-466-653
University of Stirling

Public Release: 26-May-2015
UN Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board
Top challenges for the future of humanity and the planet
Leading global experts serving on the UN Secretary-General's Scientific Advisory Board have identified key scientific challenges that must be addressed to ensure the sustainability of humanity on Earth.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-878-8712
UNESCO and Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Climate engineering may save coral reefs, study shows
Geoengineering of the climate may be the only way to save coral reefs from mass bleaching, according to new research.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Duncan Sandes
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Ecology Letters
An evolutionary heads-up
Animals with large brains are considered to be more intelligent and more successful than those with smaller brains. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna and Stockholm University have provided the first experimental evidence that large brains provide an evolutionary advantage. Large-brained female fish have a higher survival rate than those with small brains when faced with a predator, although brain size surprisingly did not influence male survival. The results were published in Ecology Letters.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
susanna.kautschitsch@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 22-May-2015
The Biological Bulletin
Estuaries protect Dungeness crabs from deadly parasites
Parasitic worms can pose a serious threat to the Dungeness crab, a commercially important fishery species found along the west coast of North America. The worms are thought to have caused or contributed to the crash of the crab fishery of central California during the last half century. New research shows that infected crabs can rid themselves of parasites by moving into the less salty water of estuaries. Low salinity kills the worms creating a parasite refuge for the crabs.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Showing releases 341-350 out of 440.

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