Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 341-350 out of 393.

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Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
NASA captures birth of Tropical Cyclone Olwyn headed for northwestern Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite saw newly formed Tropical Cyclone Olwyn nearing northwestern Australia on March 11 when it passed overhead. Meanwhile, Tropical Cyclone Nathan was threatening northeastern Australia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan begin circling near Queensland coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Nathan as it was beginning to make a cyclonic loop near the eastern coast of Queensland's Cape York Peninsula on March 11.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Fisheries Oceanography
New research reveals low-oxygen impacts on West Coast groundfish
New research by NOAA Fisheries and Oregon State University finds that low-oxygen waters projected to expand with climate change create winners and losers among deep-dwelling groundfish. Some species are adapted to handle low-oxygen conditions such as those increasingly documented off the West Coast, while the same conditions drive other species away.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Bigelow Laboratory's Shimmield recognized for contributions to oceanography
Graham Shimmield, executive director of Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean received the Society for Underwater Technology's President's Award 2014, given annually to a member of the international ocean community. The Society for Underwater Technology focuses on underwater technology, ocean science, and offshore engineering. Shimmield was recognized for bridging the space between science, industry, and academia. He serves as Chair of INSITE, providing independent scientific, evidence-based information on the impact of man-made structures in the North Sea.

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
TRMM sees large and more powerful Cyclone Pam, warnings posted
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite saw powerful towering thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Pam, indicating the storm was strengthening as it moved through the Solomon Islands. Pam has now triggered warnings in the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Scientists reconstruct evolutionary history of whale hearing
Changes in ear bone development in the womb paralleled changes observed throughout whale evolution, providing new insight about how whales adapted to hearing underwater.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Rapid coastal population growth may leave many exposed to sea-level rise
The number of people potentially exposed to future sea level rise and associated storm surge flooding may be highest in low-elevation coastal zones in Asia and Africa.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Iron-oxidizing bacteria found along Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Bacteria that live on iron were found for the first time at three well-known vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These bacteria likely play an important role in deep-ocean iron cycling, and are dominant members of communities near and adjacent to sulfur-rich hydrothermal vents prevalent along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This group of iron-oxidizing bacteria, Zetaproteobacteria, appears to be restricted to environments where iron is plentiful, suggesting they are highly evolved to utilize iron for energy.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
BioScience
A sea change for ocean resource management
Ocean ecosystems around the world are threatened by overfishing, extensive shipping routes, energy exploration, pollution and other consequences of ocean-based industry. Data exist that could help protect these vulnerable ecosystems, but current management strategies often can't react quickly enough to new information. San Diego State University biologist Rebecca Lewison and colleagues from several other academic, governmental and non-governmental organizations endorse a new approach called 'dynamic ocean management' in a paper published today in BioScience.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Scientists reconstruct evolutionary history of whale hearing with rare museum collection
The National Museum of Natural History's research team CT scanned fetal whale specimens from the museum's marine mammal collection to trace the development of fetal ear bones in 56 specimens from 10 different whale families. Their findings confirmed that changes in the development of ear bones in the womb paralleled changes observed throughout whale evolution, providing new insight about how whales made the dramatic evolutionary shift from land to sea and adapted to hearing underwater.
Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Katie Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Showing releases 341-350 out of 393.

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