Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 341-350 out of 391.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Tundra carbon, young atmospheric scientists, Mexico, & 3 new papers
Arctic tundra stores carbon during the summer and releases some of it during the winter. But a new study shows that carbon released during the winter now outweighs the summertime gains, resulting in a net loss of carbon to the atmosphere.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
202-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
Fiamma Straneo selected for prestigious Sverdrup Lecture
The American Geophysical Union has chosen Fiamma Straneo, a physical oceanographer at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, to deliver the Sverdrup Lecture at this year's meeting of the Ocean Sciences section held in New Orleans from Feb. 21-26, 2016. The lecture is one of the highest awards the section bestows on its members.
American Geophysical Union

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oxygen-starved oceans held back life's recovery after the 'Great Dying'
Analysis of ancient seabed rocks from disparate locations reveal that life did not rebound until anoxia had fully ebbed.

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Winston intensifying near Tonga
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible picture of Tropical Cyclone Winston as it continued to intensify over the Southern Pacific Ocean and affect Tonga. On Feb. 17 at 01:00 UTC (Feb. 16 at 8 p.m. EST) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Winston that showed an eye surrounded by powerful thunderstorms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Uriah nearing peak
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Uriah early on Feb 17 when the storm was nearing peak intensity and showed a powerful storm with an eye wide open. Earlier, NASA's GPM core satellite found heavy rainfall occurring south of the intensifying storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
DNA evidence shows that salmon hatcheries cause substantial, rapid genetic changes
A new study on steelhead trout in Oregon offers genetic evidence that wild and hatchery fish are different at the DNA level, and that they can become different with surprising speed. The research found that after one generation of hatchery culture, the offspring of wild fish and first-generation hatchery fish differed in the activity of more than 700 genes.
Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Contact: Michael Blouin
blouinm@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-2362
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Journal of Experimental Biology
Bizarre snail that swims like a flying insect
Sea butterflies are microscopic snails that swim in Arctic waters using wing-like structures that protrude from the shell opening, but now scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, have discovered that they probably have more in common with insects than other molluscs. Instead of using a paddling technique to swim, the minute snails beat their wings in a figure-of-eight wing beat pattern, just like flying insects.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn.knight@biologists.com
44-012-236-32871
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Ecology Letters
Are conservation efforts for coral reefs misguided?
A recent global analysis indicates that more than half of coral reefs are located less than 30 minutes from the nearest human settlement, but these reefs are receiving less protection than reefs located farther away from people.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Winston threatening Tonga and American Samoa
NASA satellites have been providing data on Tropical Cyclone Winston in the Southwestern Pacific, and watched the storm over the past couple of days as it weakened to a tropical storm. Today, Feb. 16, Winston regained hurricane-force and threatens Tonga and American Samoa.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Research explains near-island biological hotspots in barren ocean basins
Coral reef islands and atolls in the Pacific are predominantly surrounded by vast areas of ocean that have very low nutrient levels and low ecological production. However, the ecosystems near these islands and atolls are often extremely productive. An international team of scientists published a study today which provides the first basin-scale investigation of this paradoxical increase in productivity near coral reef islands and atolls -- referred to as the 'Island Mass Effect.'
NOAA/Coral Reef Conservation Program

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Showing releases 341-350 out of 391.

<< < 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 > >>