Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 36-45 out of 354.

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Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
NASA satellite data shows Hagupit dropped almost 19 inches of rainfall
Typhoon Hagupit soaked the Philippines, and a NASA rainfall analysis indicated the storm dropped almost 19 inches in some areas. After Hagupit departed the Philippines as a tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite passed over and captured a picture of the storm curled up like a cat waiting to pounce when it landfalls in Vietnam on Dec. 11.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
ZooKeys
Ancient creature discovered in the depths of the Arctic Ocean
An extraordinary animal has been discovered more than 1.5 miles (2.5 km) below the ocean surface off the coast of northern Alaska, USA. The new species is a type of bivalve mollusk (clams, mussels, oysters etc.). Age estimates place the new clam as living more than 1.8 million years ago to the near present, but scientists can't discount that it might still be alive today. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Paul Valentich-Scott
pvscott@sbnature2.org
805-682-4711 x146
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Progress in Oceanography
Climate change projected to drive species northward
Anticipated changes in climate will push West Coast marine species from sharks to salmon northward an average of 30 kilometers per decade, shaking up fish communities and shifting fishing grounds, according to a new study published in the journal Progress in Oceanography.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists estimate the total weight of plastic floating in the world's oceans
Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution may be floating in the world's oceans.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geology
The legend of the kamikaze typhoons
In the late 13th Century, Kublai Khan, ruler of the Mongol Empire, launched one of the world's largest armada of its time in an attempt to conquer Japan. Early narratives describe the decimation and dispersal of these fleets by the 'kamikaze' of 1274 and 1281 CE -- a pair of intense typhoons divinely sent to protect Japan from invasion.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
303-357-1057
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
NASA measures Typhoon Hagupit's Philippine rainfall from space
After hitting Samar in the Eastern Philippines Hagupit's continued slow movement resulted in high rainfall amounts along the typhoon's track. These high rainfall totals meant that flooding occurred frequently along the typhoon's track.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Put algae in your tank
Because food crops are also used for energy production, millions of people are threatened by starvation. Algae could provide an alternative: They only need sunlight to grow, thrive in salty water on barren fields. But it is a major challenge to exactly reproduce sunlight in the laboratory. In collaboration with the Berlin LED manufacturer FUTURELED scientists at the Technische Universität München have now developed a methodology for simulating all kinds of light situations.
Bavarian State

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Warmer Pacific Ocean could release millions of tons of seafloor methane
Water off Washington's coast is warming a third of a mile down, where seafloor methane shifts from a frozen solid to a gas. Calculations suggest ocean warming is already releasing significant methane offshore of Alaska to Northern California.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Scientific Reports
Ancient balloon-shaped animal fossil sheds light on Earth's ancient seas
A rare 520 million year old fossil shaped like a 'squashed bird's nest' that will help to shed new light on life within Earth's ancient seas has been discovered in China by an international research team -- and will honor the memory of a University of Leicester scientist who passed away earlier this year.
National Science Foundation in China, Royal Society in the UK

Contact: Tom Harvey
thph2@le.ac.uk
44-011-625-23644
University of Leicester

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
You are what you eat -- if you're a coral reef fish
In a world first study researchers have found a coral-eating fish that disguises its smell to hide from predators.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Showing releases 36-45 out of 354.

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