Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 36-45 out of 394.

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Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Solo dissipating
Tropical Cyclone Solo was dissipating over the Southwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on April 13, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Coexisting in a sea of competition
Diversity of life abounds on Earth, and there's no need to look any farther than the ocean's surface for proof. There are over 200,000 species of phytoplankton alone, and all of those species of microscopic marine plants that form the base of the marine food web need the same basic resources to grow -- light and nutrients.
US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fragment of continental crust found under south east Iceland
An international team, including researchers at the University of Liverpool, have shown that south east Iceland is underlain by continental crust.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
sarah.stamper@liv.ac.uk
01-517-943-044
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Nature Climate Change
Warming seas pose habitat risk for fishy favorites
Popular North Sea fish such as haddock, plaice and lemon sole could become less common on our menus because they will be constrained to preferred habitat as seas warm, according to a study published today in Nature Climate Change.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Palaeontology
What life was like for newborn giant sea lizards during the age of the dinosaur
Many scientists have studied fossils from gigantic marine lizards called mosasaurs that lived at the time of the dinosaurs and flourished in ancient seas, but little is known about aspects of their breeding and birth. Investigators have gained new insights from young mosasaur specimens collected over 100 years ago that had previously been thought to belong to ancient marine birds. Their findings are published in Palaeontology.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science
Smithsonian's Panama debate fueled by zircon dating
New evidence published in Science by Smithsonian geologists dates the closure of an ancient seaway at 13 to 15 million years ago and challenges accepted theories about the rise of the Isthmus of Panama and its impact on world climate and animal migrations.

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Dynamic dead zones alter fish catches in Lake Erie
Lake Erie's dead zones are actually quite active, greatly affecting fish distributions, catch rates and the effectiveness of fishing gear.

Contact: Marisa Lubeck
mlubeck@usgs.gov
303-202-4765
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joalane's winds consolidate around its eye
The RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station provided data about Tropical Cyclone Joalane's surface winds that showed how the strongest sustained winds consolidated as the tropical cyclone intensified and developed an eye. As of April 9, warnings were in effect at Rodrigues Island in the Southern Indian Ocean as Joalane approached.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
'Warm blob' in Pacific Ocean linked to weird weather across the US
An unusually warm patch of surface water, nicknamed 'the blob' when it emerged in early 2014, is part of a Pacific Ocean pattern that may be affecting everything from West Coast fisheries and water supplies to East Coast snowstorms.
NOAA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Ferromanganese crusts record past climates
The onset of northern hemispheric glaciation cycles three million years ago has dramatically changed Arctic climate. Scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany have now for the first time reconstructed the history of Arctic climate based on records archived in ferromanganese crusts. The study, a collaboration with the United States Geological Survey and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, has now been published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

Contact: Dr. Andreas Villwock
presse@geomar.de
49-431-600-2802
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Showing releases 36-45 out of 394.

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