Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 36-45 out of 385.

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Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
Patterns of glowing sharks get clearer with depth
A team of researchers has found that catsharks are not only able to see the bright green biofluorescence they produce, but that they increase contrast of their glowing pattern when deep underwater. The study, conducted with a custom-built 'shark-eye' camera that simulates how the shark sees underwater, shows that fluorescence makes catsharks more visible to neighbors of the same species at the depths that they live and may aid in communication between one another.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society, and The Dalio Foundation

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Nature Geoscience
Researchers discover fate of melting glacial ice in Greenland
A team of researchers led by faculty at the University of Georgia has discovered the fate of much of the freshwater that pours into the surrounding oceans as the Greenland ice sheet melts every summer. They published their findings today in the journal Nature Geoscience.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
NASA sees wind shear end Tropical Cyclone Amos
On Sunday, April 24, 2016 Tropical Cyclone Amos ran into increasing wind shear that tore the storm apart. A composite satellite image from two satellites showed waning precipitation and lack of thunderstorm development from wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Ecology and Evolution
Do fish survive in streams in winter?
Most stream-resident fish stay throughout winter despite the ice. This has been shown by Christine Weber, previous researcher at Umeå University, by tagging trout and sculpins with transponders to follow fish migration. Fish's general state of health is the single most important factor for surviving winter. The findings have been published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-706-040-334
Umea University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Nature Microbiology
Algae disrupt coral reefs' recycling
A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University and published today in the journal Nature Microbiology explores how a process known as 'microbialization' destroys links in coral reefs' delicate food chain.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Price
mprice@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-0389
San Diego State University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Nature
Ancient marine sediments provide clues to future climate change
Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was the major driver behind the global climatic shifts that occurred between 53 and 34 million years ago, according to new research led by the University of Southampton.
National Environment Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
PLOS ONE
Live-bearing anemone undergoes major shifts in nutrition as young develop
The offspring of a brooding sea anemone transition from using egg yolks to prenatal, then post-natal, parental feeding during their development, according to a study published April 22, 2016, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Beth Jones
bjones@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Science Advances
Scientists discover new reef system at mouth of Amazon River
A new reef system has been found at the mouth of the Amazon River, the largest river by discharge of water in the world. As large rivers empty into the world's oceans in areas known as plumes, they typically create gaps in the reef distribution along the tropical shelves--something that makes finding a reef in the Amazon plume an unexpected discovery.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, CNPq, CAPES, FAPERJ, FAPESP, Brasoil, MCTI, Brazilian Navy

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Amos threatening American Samoa
As the seven islands of American Samoa were bracing for Tropical Cyclone Amos, NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm affecting the Southwestern Pacific Islands of Wallis and Futuna. Warnings were already in effect for American Samoa on April 22 as the storm continued moving east toward the islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Fantala slowing
On April 21, Fantala's maximum sustained wind speeds started to decrease since making a 'U-turn' and moving southeastward to a position northeast of Madagascar and the storm maintained strength on April 22. NASA's RapidScat instrument measured winds around the system while NASA-JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall rates with the hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 36-45 out of 385.

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