Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

The Great Barrier Reef and other World Heritage Sites are under immediate threat of collapse if better management practices are not implemented soon, according to research published recently in Science. Read about why and what can be done on EurekAlert!.


Video:Using state-of-the-art GPS-linked satellite tags, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Large Pelagic Research Center are tracking the complex migration habits of leatherback sea turtles. See them in action here and read about their efforts on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-360 out of 378.

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Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
PeerJ
Sizing up giants under the sea
Researchers sifted through multiple datasets and historical records to produce more accurate and comprehensive measurements for 25 species including the blue whale, giant squid, and great white shark. The team, comprised of a mix of scientists and students, also utilized social media to promote the research and reach potential collaborators from across the world.
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Greenland meltwater contributes to rising sea levels
As the largest single chunk of melting snow and ice in the world, the massive ice sheet that covers about 80 percent of Greenland is recognized as the biggest potential contributor to rising sea levels due to glacial meltwater.
NASA Cryospheric Sciences program

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite spots Tropical Cyclone Bansi intensifying quickly
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Bansi on January 12 as it was intensifying rapidly and saw a cloud-covered eye in the storm's center. Bansi has triggered warnings for the island of Mauritius and is expected to continue intensifying while passing it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Pharmacological Reviews
Fish peptide could help in battle against cardiovascular disease
A major international review of a peptide originally found in fish that could be used in the battle against cardiovascular disease has been published. Professor David Lambert from the University of Leicester's Department of Cardiovascular Sciences contributed to the review.

Contact: David Lambert
dgl3@leicester.ac.uk
01-162-523-161
University of Leicester

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Physical Review Letters
They see flow signals: Researchers identify nature of fish's 'sixth sense'
A team of scientists has identified how a 'sixth sense' in fish allows them to detect flows of water, which helps resolve a long-standing mystery about how these aquatic creatures respond to their environment.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
China's water stress set to worsen with transfer initiatives
New research paints a grim picture for the future of China's water supply, as its booming economy continues to heap pressure on its natural resources, according to scientists at the University of East Anglia, the University of Leeds and other international institutions. The findings are published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.
Economic and Social Research Council, Philip Leverhulme Prize, University of Leeds Cheney Fellowship, Worldwide Universities Network

Contact: Laura Potts
press@uea.ac.uk
44-160-359-3007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UCLA-led study shows how meltwater on Greenland's ice sheet contribute to rising sea levels
Using satellite and field work after an extreme melt event in Greenland, a UCLA-led study finds that melt-prone areas on its ice sheet develop a remarkably efficient drainage system of stunning blue streams and rivers that carry meltwater into moulins (sinkholes) and ultimately the ocean. However, the team's measurements at the ice's edge show that climate models alone can overestimate the volume of meltwater flowing to the ocean if they fail to account for water storage beneath the ice.

Contact: Meg Sullivan
msullivan@support.ucla.edu
310-825-1046
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Reviews in Fish­eries Sci­ence & Aqua­cul­ture
Recreational fishing in the Mediterranean is more harmful than previously thought
A total of 10 percent of adults living in developed countries practice recreational fishing, which in the Mediterranean Sea represents around 10 percent of the total production of fisheries. Despite its importance, this fishing is not as controlled or studied as professional fishing. For the first time, a study examines this activity, whose effects are increasingly more similar to traditional fishing. For this reason, scientists demand greater control.

Contact: SINC Team
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
The devil is in the detail
Researchers have looked at a species of fish to help unravel one of the biggest mysteries in evolutionary biology.

Contact: Rachael Fergusson
rachael.fergusson@monash.edu
61-399-034-841
Monash University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Oceanography
Surviving typhoons
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology researcher Mary Grossmann studied micro-organisms during three typhoons to figure out what happened to the ocean's tiny creatures when the waters churn.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Showing releases 351-360 out of 378.

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