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Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-360 out of 443.

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Public Release: 20-May-2015
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Surviving harsh environments becomes a death-trap for specialist corals
The success of corals that adapt to survive in the world's hottest sea could contribute to their demise through global warming, according to new research.
Natural Environment Research Council, European Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Journal of Applied Ecology
Offshore wind turbine construction could be putting seals' hearing at risk
Noise from pile driving during offshore wind turbine construction could be damaging the hearing of harbour seals around the UK, according to ecologists who attached GPS data loggers to 24 harbor seals while offshore wind turbines were being installed in 2012. Data on the seals' locations and their diving behaviour was combined with information from the wind farm developers on when pile driving was taking place. Models revealed that half of the tagged seals were exposed to noise levels that exceeded hearing damage thresholds.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 20-May-2015
PLOS ONE
Deepwater Horizon oil spill contributed to high number of Gulf dolphin deaths
As part of an unusual mortality event investigation, a team of scientists has discovered that dead bottlenose dolphins stranded in the northern Gulf of Mexico since the start of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have lung and adrenal lesions consistent with petroleum product exposure according to a paper published today in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE.
Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Seeing without eyes
The skin of the California two-spot octopus can sense light even without input from the central nervous system.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 20-May-2015
PLOS ONE
Paleontologists discover the first dinosaur fossil in Washington State
The fossils of the first dinosaur fossil from Washington State were collected along the shores of Sucia Island State Park in the San Juan Islands, and described in a study.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Ecology Letters
Bugs and slugs ideal houseguests for seagrass health
A simultaneous experiment spanning 15 sites across the Northern Hemisphere shows biodiversity is as important as reducing fertilizer runoff for valuable seagrass ecosystems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pamela Reynolds
plreynolds@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 19-May-2015
NASA's triple examination of Typhoon Dolphin
Three different platforms have been examining Typhoon Dolphin as it moves through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-May-2015
NASA tracks Typhoon Dolphin on approach to Iwo To
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over a weakening Typhoon Dolphin on May 18 as it moved closer to Iwo To island, Japan, in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-May-2015
UM-based cooperative research institute receives $125 million award, renewed agreement
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration awarded the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies up to $125 million to fund the consortium's activities over the next five years. CIMAS, which is based at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, brings together the research and educational resources of 10 partner universities to increase scientific understanding of Earth's oceans and atmosphere within the context of NOAA's mission.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Historical land use an important factor for carbon cycling in northern lakes
The historical past is important in understanding environmental conditions today and predicting how these might change in the future. This is according to researchers from Umeå University in Sweden, whose analyses of lake-sediment records show how lake-water carbon concentrations have varied depending on long-term natural dynamics over thousands of years, but also in response to human impacts over the past several hundred years. The study has been published in PNAS.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-706-040-334
Umea University

Showing releases 351-360 out of 443.

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