Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 361-370 out of 385.

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Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Today's disposable society: Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern
An increasing amount of drugs taken by humans and animals make it into streams and waterways, and pharmaceutical pollution has had catastrophic ecosystem consequences despite low levels of concentration in the environment. The effect of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern on the environment will be addressed in a special issue of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

Contact: Jen Lynch
jen.lynch@setac.org
850-469-1500
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
ZooKeys
Long-snouted Amazonian catfishes including three new species to form a new genus
Being close relatives within the same genus, eight catfishes showed enough external differences, such as characteristic elongated mouths, hinting to their separate origin. Following a thorough morphological as well as molecular analysis, a team of researchers suggested that five previously known species along with three new ones, which they have found during their survey, need a new genus to accommodate for their specificity. Their study is available in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Fabio F. Roxo
roxoff@hotmail.com.br
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Sharks' hunting ability destroyed under climate change
The hunting ability and growth of sharks will be dramatically impacted by increased CO2 levels and warmer oceans expected by the end of the century, a University of Adelaide study has found.

Contact: Ivan Nagelkerken
ivan.nagelkerken@adelaide.edu.au
61-477-320-551
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Science
Ancient mass extinction led to dominance of tiny fish, Penn paleontologist shows
According to new research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Lauren Sallan, a mass extinction 359 million years ago known as the Hangenberg event triggered a drastic and lasting transformation of Earth's vertebrate community.
University of Pennsylvania, Kalamazoo College, University of Michigan, Michigan Society of Fellows

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Science
Oceans -- and ocean activism -- deserve broader role in climate change discussions
Researchers argue that both ocean scientists and world leaders should pay more attention to how communities are experiencing, adapting to and even influencing changes in the world's oceans.

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Science
Massive northeast Greenland glacier is rapidly melting, UCI-led team finds
A glacier in northeast Greenland that holds enough water to raise global sea levels by more than 18 inches has come unmoored from a stabilizing sill and is crumbling into the North Atlantic Ocean. Losing mass at a rate of 5 billion tons per year, glacier Zachariae Isstrom entered a phase of accelerated retreat in 2012, according to findings published in the current issue of Science.
NASA's Cryospheric Sciences Program

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@uci.edu
949-824-8249
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Human handouts could be spreading disease from birds to people
People feeding white ibises at public parks are turning the normally independent birds into beggars, and now researchers at the University of Georgia say it might also be helping spread disease. They recently launched a study to find out how being fed by humans is changing the health, ecology and behavior of white ibises in south Florida, where construction and land development is drying up their wetland habitats.
National Science Foundation's Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Program

Contact: Sonia Hernandez
shernz@uga.edu
706-542-9727
University of Georgia

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: The Fundao Dam, cyanobacteria, and three new research papers
This week from AGU are papers on the Fundao Dam, cyanobacteria, and three new research papers.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
202-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
$4.2 million NSF grant helps biologist gather large-scale river measurements
Walter Dodds, university distinguished professor of biology, is part of a collaborative five-year, $4.2 million National Science Foundation project to better understand how climate change affects river systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Southern right whale calf wounding by kelp gulls increased to nearly all over 4 decades
Wounding of southern right whale calves and mothers by kelp gulls has increased from 2 percent to 99 percent over four decades, according to a study published Oct. 21, 2015, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carina Marón from the University of Utah and colleagues.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Showing releases 361-370 out of 385.

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