Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 371-380 out of 394.

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Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Ferromanganese crusts record past climates
The onset of northern hemispheric glaciation cycles three million years ago has dramatically changed Arctic climate. Scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany have now for the first time reconstructed the history of Arctic climate based on records archived in ferromanganese crusts. The study, a collaboration with the United States Geological Survey and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, has now been published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

Contact: Dr. Andreas Villwock
presse@geomar.de
49-431-600-2802
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Deep Sea Research II
Dispersant used to clean Deepwater Horizon spill more toxic to corals than the oil
The dispersant used to remediate the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is more toxic to cold-water corals in lower concentrations than the spilled oil.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Preston M. Moretz
pmoretz@temple.edu
215-204-4380
Temple University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Road salt guidelines need review to protect food chain in lakes: York U study
The study, conducted in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, suggests that lake and highway authorities consider adjusting road salt use protocols to protect aquatic life such as the water flea, by taking the nutritional status of the lakes into account. In particular, the study suggests revising the Water Quality Guideline for chloride, especially for lakes near winter-maintained roads on the Canadian Shield that tend to have very low nutrient levels.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
suhasini@yorku.ca
416-736-4354
York University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Global Solutions to Regional Problems: Collecting Global Expertise to Address the Problem of Harmful
U-M researchers track the toxicity of Lake Erie cyanobacterial blooms
Efforts to reduce the amount of phosphorus and other nutrients washing off farm fields and into Lake Erie shifted into overdrive after high levels of a bacterial toxin shut down the drinking water supply to more than 400,000 Toledo-area residents last August.
University of Michigan Water Center

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science
Greatest mass extinction driven by acidic oceans, study finds
Changes to the Earth's oceans, caused by extreme volcanic activity, triggered the greatest extinction of all time, a study suggests.
International Centre for Carbonate Reservoirs, Natural Environment Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, German Research Foundation, Marsden Fund

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Ocean myth busted: 'Toddler' sea turtles are very active swimmers
It turns out sea turtles, even at a tender 6-18 months of age, are very active swimmers. They don't just passively drift in ocean currents as researchers once thought. NOAA and University of Central Florida researchers say it's an important new clue in the sea turtle 'lost years' mystery. Where exactly turtles travel in their first years of life, before returning to coastal areas as adults to forage and reproduce, has puzzled scientists for decades.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Cell
In the sea, a deadly form of leukemia is catching
Outbreaks of leukemia that have devastated some populations of soft-shell clams along the east coast of North America for decades can be explained by the spread of cancerous tumor cells from one clam to another. Researchers call the discovery, reported in the Cell Press journal Cell on April 9, 2015, 'beyond surprising.'
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Recovery potential for the world's coral reef fish
A simple test of the number of fish living on a coral reef can be used as a road map to restore degraded reefs and fishers' livelihoods according to a global study published in the journal Nature.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Mysteries of the deep
Scientists who have spent much of their careers in deep-sea submersibles observing coral and sponges are sharing their experiences and expertise through innovative online seminars.

Contact: Michael Milstein
Michael.Milstein@noaa.gov
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
NASA analyzes rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Joalane
NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite provided scientists with a look 'under the hood' of Tropical Cyclone Joalane's clouds at the rate in which rain was falling throughout the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 371-380 out of 394.

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