Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 371-380 out of 383.

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Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Sea ice loss associated with increased summer land use by Chukchi Sea polar bears
Polar bears' use of land during substantial summer sea ice loss in the Chukchi Sea increased by 30 days, according to a study published Nov. 18, 2015, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karyn Rode from the US Geological Survey, Alaska, and colleagues.
See financial disclosure

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Powerful new global arena needed to confront coming water challenges, elite UN board warns
The final report of a board of 20 independent advisors to the UN Secretary-General on water and sanitation offers blunt observations and calls for an overhaul of the way the world body deals with the issues.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-878-8712
UN Secretary-General's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Ecosphere
Small landscape changes can mean big freshwater gains
A new opportunity for improving the health and supply of Wisconsin's lakes, waterways and groundwater has emerged from a recent study in the journal Ecosphere by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Water Sustainability and Climate Project.

Contact: Jiangxiao Qiu
jqiu7@wisc.edu
608-556-6982
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm 27W form in Marianas Islands, warnings up
The tropical low pressure area previously known as System 95W consolidated and was classified as a Tropical Depression 27W on Nov. 17, 2015. The Suomi NPP satellite captured a view of the strengthening storm as warnings were posted in Micronesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
NASA measures India's deadly flooding rains
During the past week extreme rainfall from two slow moving tropical low pressure areas caused severe flooding in southeastern India. One of the lows, designated System 97B continued to linger along the southeastern Indian coast on Nov. 17. As System 97B and another low pressure area dropped heavy rainfall, NASA and partners around the world gathered data using an array of satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Understanding seal movement can help mitigate seal-fishery conflict
Understanding the differences in the behavior of different seal species can help in the choice of the most effective measures to mitigate the seal-fishery conflict and in the sustainable management of seal stocks. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland provides novel and detailed information of the movements of ringed seals and grey seals in the Baltic Sea.

Contact: Sari Oksanen
sari.oksanen@uef.fi
358-504-100-756
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Marine fungi reveal new branches on tree of life
Researchers from the University of Exeter have discovered several new species of marine fungi inhabiting previously undescribed branches of the tree of life. Little is known about the fungi flourishing in the world's oceans and this study, which set out to investigate its diversity and abundance, revealed that many marine fungi are very different from those found on land.

Contact: Jo Bowler
J.Bowler@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Fat makes coral fit to cope with climate change
A year ago, researchers discovered that fat helps coral survive heat stress over the short term -- and now it seems that fat helps coral survive over the long term, too. The study offers important clues as to which coral species are most likely to withstand repeated bouts of heat stress, called 'bleaching,' as climate change warms world oceans.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
Gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
GigaScience
Brooding brittle star babies in 3-D
An article in GigaScience presents 3-D images of the inside of live-bearing brittle stars, relatives of starfish, and these 100 GB of data are freely available. The high-resolution images created by microCT, allow the analysis of developing brittle star young, but also -- besides being cool to look at -- are perfect for sharing with other researchers. Large-data sharing, though difficult, is an essential part of making research both reproducible and reusable in the broadest sense.
German Academic Exchange Service, National Research Foundation SEAChange Programme

Contact: Scott Edmunds
scott@gigasciencejournal.com
852-361-03531
GigaScience

Public Release: 16-Nov-2015
Marine Micropaleontology
Microbes that are key indicators of Puget Sound's health in decline
Paleontologists with the University of Washington's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture find that tiny organisms called foraminifera have a big story to tell about the health of Puget Sound. Two recent studies about the health of Bellingham Bay and inlets in the Bremerton area found the diversity and number of foraminifera -- single-celled marine organisms that live on the sea floor -- deteriorated significantly.

Contact: Andrea Godinez
burkepr@uw.edu
206-616-7538
University of Washington

Showing releases 371-380 out of 383.

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