Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 371-380 out of 393.

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Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Evolutionary Applications
Evolving to cope with climate change
Researchers have successfully measured the potential of the Atlantic Silverside to adapt to ocean acidification. This is the first such measurement for a vertebrate animal.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Miller
tim.miller@uconn.edu
860-486-4064
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Earth's Future
The tides they are a changin'
Scientists from the University of Southampton have found that ocean tides have changed significantly over the last century at many coastal locations around the world.
Natural Environmental Research Council, Engineering and Physical Science Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Journal of Coastal Research
Evidence indicates Yucatan Peninsula hit by tsunami 1,500 years ago
The eastern coastline of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, a mecca for tourists, may have been walloped by a tsunami between 1,500 and 900 years ago, says a new study involving Mexico's Centro Ecological Akumal and the University of Colorado Boulder.
Centro Ecological Akumal, United States Geological Survey

Contact: Charles Shaw
yucatanchas@hotmail.com
831-884-5635
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
New detector sniffs out origins of methane
An instrument identifies methane's origins in mines, deep-sea vents, and cows.
National Science Foundation, Shell Oil, Deep Carbon Observatory, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, German Research Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find
An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. In a new study published March 6 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by University of Georgia ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Gavrilles
bethgav@uga.edu
706-542-7247
University of Georgia

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Menopausal whales are influential and informative leaders
Menopause is a downright bizarre trait among animals. It's also rare. Outside of the human species, only the female members of two whale species outlive their reproductive lives in such a major way. Female killer whales typically become mothers between the ages of 12 and 40, but they can live for more than 90 years. Males rarely make it past 50. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology have new evidence to explain why.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Old mothers know best: Killer whale study sheds light on the evolution of menopause
A new study led by the Universities of Exeter and York has shown that female killer whales survive after menopause because they help their family members find food during hard times. This research provides insights into why women continue to live long after they can no longer have children.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-787-943-3087
University of Exeter

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
James Cook University in major study on rapid fish acclimatization
A JCU team from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has been granted more than $600,000 to find out why fish exposed to high water temperatures have offspring that are born already acclimatized to the high temperatures.
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
61-747-814-942
James Cook University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
Scientists question rush to build Nicaragua canal
A consortium of environmental scientists including Rice University's Pedro Alvarez has expressed strong concern about the impact of a controversial Central American canal across Nicaragua.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
NSU researchers discover hurricanes helped accelerate spread of lionfish
NSU researchers studied the correlation between hurricanes and spread of invasive species, lionfish, due to changes in ocean currents.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Showing releases 371-380 out of 393.

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