Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video:The invasive crown-of-thorns-starfish (COTS) accounts for an estimated 40 percent of the Great Barrier Reef's total decline in coral cover, but University of Queensland researchers have developed a new robotic system for eradicating it that will take the pressure off human divers. See through the eyes of their COTSbot here and read about it's development on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 381-390 out of 520.

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Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Armored in concrete, hardened shorelines lose the soft protections of coastal wetlands
Highlights from the August 2015 issue of ESA's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Contact: Liza Lester
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Climate models, Earth's elasticity & 5 new research papers
Scientists have matched the output of climate models to the way the Earth's temperature record is constructed in a new study in Geophysical Research Letters. Dan Satterfield explores how climate models are doing an even better job at predicting the Earth's temperature than was thought.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Guillermo closing in on Hawaii
NASA's Terra satellite and RapidScat provided forecasters with information about Tropical Storm Guillermo, revealing that the strongest winds were on the northern and eastern sides.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
River buries permafrost carbon at sea
As temperatures rise, some of the organic carbon stored in Arctic permafrost meets an unexpected fate -- burial at sea. As many as 2.2 million metric tons of organic carbon per year are swept along by a single river system into Arctic Ocean sediment, according to a new study an international team of researchers published today in Nature.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Study looks at best way to bring healthy streams back after development
Is it possible to truly restore a stream disturbed by housing developments and road construction? Can it return to its natural state, complete with buzzing insects and fish and worms that wiggle through its muddy bottom? Ecologist Robert Hilderbrand is about the find out.
Chesapeake Bay Trust

Contact: apelsinsky@umces.edu
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Nova Southeastern University researcher discovers a new deep-sea fish species
NSU researcher working in the deepest parts of the Gulf of Mexico has identified a new species of anglerfish. With the help of a colleague from the University of Washington, three female specimens from this new species have been cataloged and identified.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Parental experience may help coral offspring survive climate change
A new study from scientists at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa's Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology reveals that preconditioning adult corals to increased temperature and ocean acidification resulted in offspring that may be better able to handle those future environmental stressors. This rapid trans-generational acclimatization may be able to 'buy time' for corals in the race against climate change.
National Science Foundation, National Marine Sanctuary Program and Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology Reserve Partnership, International Society for Reef Studies, Ocean Conservancy, American Fisheries Society, and US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Journal of Heredity
Finding the 'conservación' in conservation genetics
A recently published special issue of the Journal of Heredity focuses on case studies of real-world applications of conservation genetics in Latin America, from nabbing parrot smugglers to exposing fraudulent fish sales.

Contact: Nancy Steinberg
American Genetic Association

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sardines, anchovies, other fast-growing fish vulnerable to dramatic population plunges
A Rutgers marine biologist studying the rise and fall of fish populations worldwide recently made a counterintuitive discovery: ocean species that grow quickly and reproduce frequently are more likely to experience dramatic plunges in population than larger, slower growing fish such as sharks or tuna. In nearly all of the cases, overfishing was the culprit. Combining climate variability with high levels of fishing greatly increases the risk of population collapse.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
Rutgers University

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Seagrass thrives surprisingly well in toxic sediments -- but still dies all over the world
Toxic is bad. Or is it? New studies of seagrasses reveal that they are surprisingly good at detoxifying themselves when growing in toxic seabed. But if seagrasses are stressed by their environment, they lose the ability and die. All over the world seagrasses are increasingly stressed and one factor contributing to this can be lack of detoxification.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
University of Southern Denmark

Showing releases 381-390 out of 520.

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