Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Many once-endangered marine species have reached recovery levels that may warrant them coming off of the endangered species list. This recovery is presenting new challenges however as human communities sometimes struggle to adapt to their sudden return. Read more on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 381-390 out of 396.

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Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees the end of Tropical Cyclone Ikola
Strong vertical wind shear has taken a toll on Tropical Cyclone Ikola and that was pretty clear in a visible-light image from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite today, April 8.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Palaeontology
Newly discovered ancient arthropod lived hundreds of millions of years ago
The Burgess Shale Formation, in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the most famous fossil locations in the world. A recent Palaeontology study introduces a 508 million year old (middle Cambrian) arthropod -- called Yawunik kootenayi -- from exceptionally preserved specimens of the new Marble Canyon locality within the Burgess Shale Formation.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Paleobiology
X-raying the past: New insights into the life of extinct marine creatures
Using state-of-the-art imaging techniques, palaeontologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have been examining extinct marine creatures. Quantitative analyses provide new evidence that ammonites were able to swim using their shell -- very much like the recent nautilus. For the purpose of the study, the researchers, together with partners from the industry, developed an evaluation process for high-res CT images. The science magazine 'RUBIN' reports about the results.

Contact: Dr René Hoffmann
Rene.Hoffmann@rub.de
49-234-322-7769
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Complex bacterial challenge in fight against deadly amphibian disease
New research from The University of Manchester and the Institute of Zoology has shed light on the complex challenge facing scientists battling one of the world's most devastating animal diseases.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Morwenna Grills
Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-52111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
New study hints at spontaneous appearance of primordial DNA
The self-organization properties of DNA-like molecular fragments four billion years ago may have guided their own growth into repeating chemical chains long enough to act as a basis for primitive life, says a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Milan.
Italian Ministries of Education, Universities and Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Noel Clark
noel.clark@colorado.edu
303-492-6420
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Expedition will sample crater left by dinosaur-killing asteroid
An international research team is formalizing plans to drill nearly 5,000 feet below the seabed to take core samples from the crater of the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs. The group met last week in Merida, Mexico, a city within the nearly 125-mile-wide impact site, to explain the research plans and put out a call for scientists to join the expedition planned for spring 2016.
European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling, International Ocean Discovery Program, International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

Contact: Monica Kortsha
mkortsha@jsg.utexas.edu
512-471-2241
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
EARTH: Kamikaze typhoons spared Japan from Kublai Kahn
In a small lake along the Japanese coast, scientists have found evidence of turbulent waters centuries ago. These telltale signs of severe weather in the geologic record support the legend of the two kamikaze typhoons that protected Japan from Mongol invasion.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Optics Express
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, US Navy develop next-gen temperature sensor to measure ocean dynamics
Temperature is one of the key variables in studying the ocean. A fiber-optic sensor developed by University of Nebraska-Lincoln engineers and the US Naval Research Laboratory can register significantly smaller temperature changes, roughly 30 times faster than existing commercial sensors.

Contact: Ming Han
mhan@unl.edu
402-472-9618
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Ecology Letters
Northern coastal marshes more vulnerable to nutrient pollution
Salt marshes at higher latitudes, including those in densely populated coastal regions of New England and Europe, are more vulnerable to the effects of eutrophication, which, if left unchecked, can trigger intense overgrazing by marsh herbivores that can destabilize marshes and reduce their ability to defend shorelines from erosion. Geography and evolution both play roles in making these marshes more susceptible to nutrient loading and overgrazing than their counterparts in the tropics.
National Science Foundation, Edward S. Stolarz Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
How many organisms do live in this aquatic habitat?
A new measurement method has been developed at Hiroshima University, Japan. The aim of this method is to estimate the distribution of aquatic animals using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction in order to quantify the number of target DNA copies present. This technique can be applied for habitat research on rare or non-native species in the field.
Japan Ministry of the Environment, Hiroshima University

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Showing releases 381-390 out of 396.

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