Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 391-400 out of 440.

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Public Release: 11-May-2015
Gulf of Maine red tide bloom expected to be similar to past 3 years
New England's spring and summer red tides will be similar in extent to those of the past three years, according to the 2015 Gulf of Maine red tide seasonal forecast. The forecast is the eighth seasonal Gulf of Maine red tide forecast funded by NOAA and issued by scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and North Carolina State University. The forecast is part of a larger NOAA effort to deliver ecological forecasts that support human health and coastal and marine stewardship.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, State of Maine, University of North Carolina State University

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
30-171-330-366
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Tropical Storm Dolphin threatening Micronesia
The MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Dolphin riding roughshod over the Federated States of Micronesia.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Ana makes landfall in South Carolina on Mother's Day
This was no Mother's Day gift to South Carolina as Ana made landfall on Sunday. Just before 6 am, Ana made landfall north of Myrtle Beach, SC with sustained winds of 45 mph, slightly lower than the 50 mph winds it was packing as a tropical storm over the Atlantic.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Noul makes landfall in Philippines, thousands flee
On Sunday, May 10, 2015, Super Typhoon Noul (designated Dodong in the Philippines) made landfall in Santa Ana, a coastal town in Cagayan on the northeastern tip of the Philippine Islands. Close to 2,500 residents evacuated as the storm crossed over, and as of today no major damage or injuries have been reported.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Solving corrosive ocean mystery reveals future climate
Around 55 million years ago, an abrupt global warming event triggered a highly corrosive deep-water current through the North Atlantic Ocean. The current's origin puzzled scientists for a decade, but an international team of researchers has now discovered how it formed and the findings may have implications for the carbon dioxide emission sensitivity of today's climate.
National Computational Infrastructure -- Australia

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Water fleas genetically adapt to climate change
The water flea has genetically adapted to climate change. Biologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, compared 'resurrected' water fleas -- hatched from 40-year-old eggs -- with more recent specimens. The project was coordinated by Professor Luc De Meester from the Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology, Evolution and Conservation.
Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology, KU Leuven Centre of Excellence on Eco- and Socio-evolutionary Dynamics

Contact: Katrien Bollen
news@kuleuven.be
KU Leuven

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Did ocean acidification cause marine mollusc extinction?
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has questioned the role played by ocean acidification, produced by the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs, in the extinction of ammonites and other planktonic calcifiers 66 million years ago.
European Project on Ocean Acidification, Natural Environment Research Council, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of Energy and Climate Change, UK Ocean Acidification Program

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Solution to corrosive ocean mystery reveals future climate
Researchers have discovered how an abrupt global warming event triggered a highly corrosive deep-water current to flow through the North Atlantic Ocean 55 million years ago solving a mystery that has puzzled scientists for a decade. The findings published in Nature Geoscience today may also help determine how sensitive our climate was to CO2 in the past.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 9-May-2015
Ana tightens up and becomes tropical
Up until Saturday morning, Ana had been referred to as a subtropical storm, rather than a tropical storm. As of Saturday morning she made the transition to a full tropical storm overnight as the storm tightened up and became more organized with most of the shower and thunderstorm activity becoming centered within Ana.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-May-2015
PLOS ONE
New tool helps researchers, managers plan for sea scallop fishery in the future
Sea scallops, one of the most valuable commercial fisheries in the United States, are a well managed and monitored fishery, yet little is known about how changing ocean temperatures and ocean chemistry and other environmental factors could impact the fishery. A study in PLOS ONE describes a new computer model to help inform scallop management discussions and decisions in the coming decades.
NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program through the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science's Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research, Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making, NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Showing releases 391-400 out of 440.

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