Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video:The invasive crown-of-thorns-starfish (COTS) accounts for an estimated 40 percent of the Great Barrier Reef's total decline in coral cover, but University of Queensland researchers have developed a new robotic system for eradicating it that will take the pressure off human divers. See through the eyes of their COTSbot here and read about it's development on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

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Showing releases 391-400 out of 522.

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Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Acta Materialia
Boxfish shell inspires new materials for body armor and flexible electronics
The boxfish's unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Liezel Labios
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Environment and Behavior
Aquariums deliver health and wellbeing benefits
In the first study of its kind, the team found that viewing aquarium displays led to noticeable reductions in blood pressure and heart rate, and that higher numbers of fish helped to hold people's attention for longer and improve their moods.

Contact: Alex Smalley
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Researchers provide new details about sea stars' immunity
A study led by a University of Texas at Arlington graduate student examining sea stars dying along the West Coast provides new clues about the starfish's immune response and its ability to protect a diverse coastal ecosystem.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
GSA Today
Past and present sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA
In a new article for GSA Today, authors Benjamin DeJong and colleagues write that sea-level rise (3.4 mm/yr) is faster in the Chesapeake Bay region than any other location on the Atlantic coast of North America, and twice the global average (1.7 mm/yr). They have found that dated interglacial deposits suggest that relative sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay region deviate from global trends over a range of timescales.

Contact: Kea Giles
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Endangered icebreakers: The future of Arctic research, exploration and rescue at risk
The United States' Icebreaker Fleet -- operated by the US Coast Guard -- consists of just two ships that are used for everything from search and rescue to national security operations to scientific research. Examine the various roles icebreakers play, especially in Arctic research, and how insufficient funding is affecting the icebreakers' roles.

Contact: Maureen Moses
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Marine Policy
Humpback whale recovery in Australia -- A cause for celebration
Australia has one of the highest rates of animal species that face extinction in the world. However, over the last decade, there have been animals that are rebounding. One example is the conservation success story of the recovery of the humpback whales that breed in Australian waters. This new study, published in Marine Policy, reviews data collected in past studies and proposes a revision of the conservation status for humpback whales found in Australian waters.

Contact: Alex Walker

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
FAU to develop unmanned marine vehicles for bridge inspections
Florida has approximately 11,450 bridges and inspecting and maintaining them is arduous, especially since so many of them span rivers, canals and saltwater areas. Researchers at FAU have received a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation to develop unmanned marine vehicles for on-water bridge inspections. Unlike manned vessels, which are continuously teleoperated by a human user, unmanned surface vehicles are capable of operating autonomously without human intervention for prolonged periods of time.
Florida Department of Transportation

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Plant light sensors came from ancient algae
The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study from Duke University. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Scientists study predator-prey behavior between sharks and turtles
A new collaborative study led by scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science & Abess Center for Ecosystem Science & Policy examined predator-prey interactions between tiger sharks and sea turtles off the Northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

Contact: Diana Udel
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
New research using NASA satellite data and ocean biology models suggests tiny organisms in vast stretches of the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead. Brighter clouds reflect more sunlight back into space affecting the amount of solar energy that reaches Earth's surface, which in turn has implications for global climate. The results were published July 17 in the journal Science Advances.

Contact: Ellen Gray
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 391-400 out of 522.

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