Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 41-50 out of 314.

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Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
New Florida Tech study links coral disease to a warming Atlantic
Over the last four decades, the iconic elkhorn and staghorn corals that dominated Caribbean reefs for millions of years have all but disappeared. According to a new study from Florida Institute of Technology, ocean warming has played a significant role in this dramatic decline.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
NASA adds up Tropical Cyclone Marcia's Queensland area rainfall
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Marcia dropped a lot of rain as it made landfall and moved over eastern Queensland, Australia from Feb. 19 to 21. Data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite was combined with other satellites to create a map of that rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Sea level spiked for 2 years along northeastern North America
Sea levels from New York to Newfoundland jumped up about four inches in 2009 and 2010 because ocean circulation changed. The unusual spike in sea level caused flooding along the northeast coast of North America and was independent of any hurricanes or winter storms. The forthcoming paper is the first to document that the extreme increase in sea level rise lasted two years, not just a few months, the researchers said.
NOAA Climate Program Office

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
PLOS Biology
World's protected natural areas receive 8 billion visits a year
Researchers say that the first study to attempt to gauge global visitation figures for protected areas reveals nature-based tourism has an economic value of hundreds of billions of dollars annually, and call for much greater investment in the conservation of protected areas in line with the values they sustain -- both economically and ecologically.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Great Barrier Reef corals eat plastic
Researchers in Australia have found that corals commonly found on the Great Barrier Reef will eat micro-plastic pollution. Microplastics are tiny fragments of plastic in the environment and are a widespread contaminant in marine ecosystems, particularly in inshore coral reefs.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parasitism runs deep in malaria's family tree
The ancestors of a large family of parasites -- including those that cause malaria -- were equipped to become parasites much earlier in their lineage than previously assumed, according to University of British Columbia research.
Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Tula Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
602-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
USF biologists: Reductions in biodiversity can elevate disease risk
Using a combination of experiments, field studies, and mathematical models, University of South Florida biologists and colleagues from four other universities show that having an abundance and diversity of predators -- such as dragonflies, damselflies, and aquatic bugs -- to eat parasites is good for the health of amphibians, a group of animals experiencing worldwide population declines.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Jason Rohr
jasonrohr@gmail.com
813-974-0156
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
University of Tennessee professor receives prestigious award for ocean science work
Karen Lloyd's work with subsea floor mud and frozen Siberian soil has earned her an extraordinarily competitive award. The assistant professor of microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has been selected as a 2015 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy Blakely
ablakely@utk.edu
865-974-5034
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Via laser into the past of the oceans
Using cutting edge technologies experts of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel together with colleagues from the UK, Canada and the United States were able to reconstruct pH values of the Northern Pacific with a high resolution since the end of the 19th century. The study, which has been published in the current issue of the international journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a clear acidification trend, but also strong seasonal fluctuations.
Federal Ministry of Education and Sciences of Germany-BIOACID, National Science and engineering Resource Council, Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jan Steffen
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Sloan Research Fellowships awarded to 126 young scholars
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding US and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders. Fellows receive $50,000 to further their research.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Nate Williams
williams@sloan.org
212-649-1692
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Showing releases 41-50 out of 314.

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