Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 41-50 out of 391.

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Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
That's amore, FAU ocean drone first to identify grouper mating calls in spawning season
Just as the sun begins to set, for just a couple of months, hundreds to thousands of groupers gather at their favorite hangouts along the shelf breaks in the southeast United States, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Basin to spawn -- and luckily they're pretty vocal about it, providing vital data on their reproductive behaviors as well as their favorite mating spots.
NOAA, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Foundation

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Coral 'toolkit' allows floating larvae to transform into reef skeletons
In a study published today, researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Rutgers University, and the University of Haifa identified key and novel components of the molecular 'toolkit' that allow corals to build their skeletons (called biomineralization) and described when -- in the transformation from floating larvae to coral skeleton -- these components are used.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marcie Workman
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Journal of Environmental Quality
Bioreactors ready for the big time
Bioreactors are passive filtration systems that can reduce nitrate losses from farm fields. Most bioreactors are simple pits filled with wood chips; bacteria on the wood chips remove 25 to 45 percent of the nitrate in runoff water. Research summarized in a special issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality highlights their potential applications and provides insight into design options.

Contact: Lauren Quinn
ldquinn@illinois.edu
217-300-2435
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
We share a molecular armor with coral reefs
A new study published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B has found that one particular molecule found in reef ecosystems plays a similar immunological role in corals as it does in humans. From an evolutionary standpoint, this suggests the molecule's immune function dates back at least 550 million years.
National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education, National Science Foundation Dimensions, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Cystic Fibrosis Research Inc

Contact: Michael Price
mprice@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-0389
San Diego State University

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
mSystems
Proteomics method measures carbon uptake of marine microbes
In a paper published April 26 in mSystems, a team of researchers led by microbiologists at Oregon State University, in Corvallis, describe a successful trial of a new method of identifying the carbon uptake of specific marine bacterioplankton taxa. The technique uses proteomics -- the large-scale study of proteins -- to observe directly the metabolic processes of communities of microorganisms.

Contact: Aleea Khan
communications@asmusa.org
202-942-9365
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
Patterns of glowing sharks get clearer with depth
A team of researchers has found that catsharks are not only able to see the bright green biofluorescence they produce, but that they increase contrast of their glowing pattern when deep underwater. The study, conducted with a custom-built 'shark-eye' camera that simulates how the shark sees underwater, shows that fluorescence makes catsharks more visible to neighbors of the same species at the depths that they live and may aid in communication between one another.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society, and The Dalio Foundation

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Nature Geoscience
Researchers discover fate of melting glacial ice in Greenland
A team of researchers led by faculty at the University of Georgia has discovered the fate of much of the freshwater that pours into the surrounding oceans as the Greenland ice sheet melts every summer. They published their findings today in the journal Nature Geoscience.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
NASA sees wind shear end Tropical Cyclone Amos
On Sunday, April 24, 2016 Tropical Cyclone Amos ran into increasing wind shear that tore the storm apart. A composite satellite image from two satellites showed waning precipitation and lack of thunderstorm development from wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Ecology and Evolution
Do fish survive in streams in winter?
Most stream-resident fish stay throughout winter despite the ice. This has been shown by Christine Weber, previous researcher at Umeå University, by tagging trout and sculpins with transponders to follow fish migration. Fish's general state of health is the single most important factor for surviving winter. The findings have been published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-706-040-334
Umea University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Nature Microbiology
Algae disrupt coral reefs' recycling
A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University and published today in the journal Nature Microbiology explores how a process known as 'microbialization' destroys links in coral reefs' delicate food chain.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Price
mprice@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-0389
San Diego State University

Showing releases 41-50 out of 391.

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