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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 41-50 out of 350.

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Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
You are what you eat -- if you're a coral reef fish
In a world first study researchers have found a coral-eating fish that disguises its smell to hide from predators.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
NASA catches 3 days of Typhoon Hagupit's motion over Philippines
NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites flew over Typhoon Hagupit from Dec. 6 through Dec. 8 and the MODIS instrument that flies aboard both satellites provided images of the storm as it moved through the country.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Coral Reefs
New research suggests Caribbean gorgonian corals are resistant to ocean acidification
A new study on tropical shallow-water soft corals, known as gorgonians, found that the species were able to calcify and grow under elevated carbon dioxide concentrations. These results suggest that Caribbean gorgonian corals may be more resilient to the ocean acidification levels projected by the end of the 21st century than previously thought.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
NOAA: Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California
According to a new NOAA-sponsored study, natural oceanic and atmospheric patterns are the primary drivers behind California's ongoing drought. A high pressure ridge off the West Coast (typical of historic droughts) prevailed for three winters, blocking important wet season storms, with ocean surface temperature patterns making such a ridge much more likely.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Study finds early warning signals of abrupt climate change
A new study by researchers at the University of Exeter has found early warning signals of a reorganization of the Atlantic oceans' circulation which could have a profound impact on the global climate system.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
HURL and NOAA team discover intact 'ghost ship' off Hawai'i
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i's Hawai'i Undersea Research Laboratory's and NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries discovered an intact 'ghost ship' in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oahu. Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship's wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the USS Kailua, was found on the seabed last year on a maritime heritage submersible mission.
Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
NASA analyzes Super Typhoon Hagupit's rains and wind on Philippine approach
Super Typhoon Hagupit is forecast to make landfall in the eastern Philippines bringing heavy rainfall, damaging winds and storm surge. NASA/JAXA's TRMM satellite and the RapidScat instrument provided rainfall and wind data, while NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. In the Philippines, Hagupit is known locally as 'Typhoon Ruby.'
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Nature
El Niño's 'remote control' on hurricanes in the Northeastern Pacific
El Niño peaks in winter and its surface ocean warming occurs mostly along the equator. However, months later, El Niño events affect the formation of intense hurricanes in the Northeastern Pacific basin -- not along the equator. Scientists from the University of Hawai'i and the National Taiwan University published a paper today in Nature that revealed what's behind 'remote control.'

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Electric eels deliver Taser-like shocks
A Vanderbilt biologist has determined that electric eels possess an electroshock system uncannily similar to a Taser.
National Science Foundation, National Academy of Sciences, Guggenheim Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Antarctic seawater temperatures rising
The temperature of the seawater around Antarctica is rising according to new University of East Anglia research. New findings published in Science reveal how shallow shelf seas of West Antarctica have warmed over the last 50 years. This has accelerated the melting and sliding of glaciers in the area, and there is no indication that this trend will reverse.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Showing releases 41-50 out of 350.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>