Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 46-55 out of 287.

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Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
GOES-West captures birth of Tropical Cyclone Niko in Southern Pacific
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured the birth of Tropical Cyclone Niko in the Southern Pacific Ocean near French Polynesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Freshwater Science
Researchers introduce macrosystems approach to study stream ecology
Kansas State University researchers have collaborated to create the Stream Biome Gradient Concept, which is a way to compare streams in different climates and different continents. The concept can improve how researchers study streams worldwide.
National Science Foundation, Konza Long-Term Ecological Research program, International Grasslands Center

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
NASA adds up Tropical Storm Mekkhala's drenching rainfall in the Philippines
NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission can measure rainfall rates from space and its data combined with other satellite data provides are used to calculate rainfall totals. After Tropical Storm Mekkhala drenched the eastern Philippines, a rainfall map was created showing almost two feet of rainfall in an isolated area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Climate change threatens 30 years of sea turtle conservation success
A new University of Central Florida study is sounding the alarm about climate change and its potential impact on more than 30 years of conservation efforts to keep sea turtles around for the next generation.

Contact: Zenaida Kotala
zenaida.kotala@ucf.edu
407-823-6120
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature
Atmospheric warming heats the bottom of ice sheets, as well as the top
New research shows for the first time that meltwater from the surface of an ice cap in northeastern Greenland can make its way beneath the ice and become trapped, refilling a subglacial lake. This meltwater provides heat to the bottom of the ice sheet and could make the ice sheet move faster and alter how it responds to the changing climate. These groundbreaking findings provide new information about atmospheric warming and its affect on the critical zone at the base of the ice.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Chemosphere
Simple soil mixture reverses toxic stormwater effects
A simple column of common soil can reverse the toxic effects of urban runoff that otherwise quickly kills young coho salmon and their insect prey, according to new research by Washington State University, NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The affordable and remarkably effective treatment offers new promise for controlling toxic pollutants that collect on paved surfaces and wash off as stormwater into rivers, streams and the ocean.
US Environmental Protection Agency, NOAA/Coastal Storms Program, The Russell Family Foundation

Contact: Jenifer McIntyre
jen.mcintyre@wsu.edu
206-369-1832
Washington State University

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Scientists drilling first deep ice core at the South Pole
The 40,000-year record will be the first deep core from this part of Antarctica, and the first record longer than 3,000 years collected south of 82 degrees latitude. The exceptional cold at the South Pole preserves trace gases better than at other locations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees remnants of Mekkhala
After Tropical Storm Mekkhala made landfall in the central Philippines and tracked north, it weakened to a depression. By Jan. 20, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw that it was a remnant circulation northeast of the Philippines, over the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
The once-powerful Tropical Cyclone Bansi stirred up ocean sediment
Tropical Cyclone Bansi reached a Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Scale on Jan. 15 and 16 as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. By Jan. 19 as the storm was weakening over open ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of sediment stirred up from the storm around the Cargados Carajos Shoals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change does not bode well for picky eaters
In a part of the world that is experiencing the most dramatic increase in temperature and climate change, two very similar species of animals are responding very differently. New research published today suggests that how these species have adapted to co-exist with one another might be to blame.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Showing releases 46-55 out of 287.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>