Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 6-15 out of 440.

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Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Conservation Physiology
New study exposes negative effects of climate change on Antarctic fish
Scientists at University of California Davis and San Francisco State University have discovered that the combination of elevated levels of carbon dioxide and an increase in ocean water temperature has a significant impact on survival and development of the Antarctic dragonfish (Gymnodraco acuticeps). The research article was published today in the journal Conservation Physiology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Chloe Foster
chloe.foster@oup.com
44-186-535-3584
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
Nature has more than one way to grow a crystal
The findings in the journal Science have implications for questions regarding how animals and plants grow minerals into shapes that have no relation to their original crystal symmetry, and why some contaminants are difficult to remove from stream sediments.

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Study of 'senior citizen' marine snails uncovered how nerve cells fail during learning
A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers' findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans.
National Institutes of Health, Maytag Foundation, Korein Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Rogue wave theory to save ships
Physicists have found an explanation for rogue waves in the ocean and hope their theory will lead to devices to warn ships and save lives.

Contact: Nail Akhmediev
Nail.Akhmediev@anu.edu.au
61-261-250-191
Australian National University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Acta Materialia
Boxfish shell inspires new materials for body armor and flexible electronics
The boxfish's unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Environment and Behavior
Aquariums deliver health and wellbeing benefits
In the first study of its kind, the team found that viewing aquarium displays led to noticeable reductions in blood pressure and heart rate, and that higher numbers of fish helped to hold people's attention for longer and improve their moods.

Contact: Alex Smalley
a.j.smalley@exeter.ac.uk
0044-187-225-8135
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Researchers provide new details about sea stars' immunity
A study led by a University of Texas at Arlington graduate student examining sea stars dying along the West Coast provides new clues about the starfish's immune response and its ability to protect a diverse coastal ecosystem.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
GSA Today
Past and present sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA
In a new article for GSA Today, authors Benjamin DeJong and colleagues write that sea-level rise (3.4 mm/yr) is faster in the Chesapeake Bay region than any other location on the Atlantic coast of North America, and twice the global average (1.7 mm/yr). They have found that dated interglacial deposits suggest that relative sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay region deviate from global trends over a range of timescales.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Endangered icebreakers: The future of Arctic research, exploration and rescue at risk
The United States' Icebreaker Fleet -- operated by the US Coast Guard -- consists of just two ships that are used for everything from search and rescue to national security operations to scientific research. Examine the various roles icebreakers play, especially in Arctic research, and how insufficient funding is affecting the icebreakers' roles.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@agiweb.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Marine Policy
Humpback whale recovery in Australia -- A cause for celebration
Australia has one of the highest rates of animal species that face extinction in the world. However, over the last decade, there have been animals that are rebounding. One example is the conservation success story of the recovery of the humpback whales that breed in Australian waters. This new study, published in Marine Policy, reviews data collected in past studies and proposes a revision of the conservation status for humpback whales found in Australian waters.

Contact: Alex Walker
a.walker@elsevier.com
44-186-584-3364
Elsevier

Showing releases 6-15 out of 440.

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