Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 6-15 out of 390.

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Public Release: 28-May-2015
Science
New study shows influence on climate of fresh water during last ice age
A new study shows how huge influxes of fresh water into the North Atlantic Ocean from icebergs calving off North America during the last ice age had an unexpected effect -- they increased the production of methane in the tropical wetlands.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rachael Rhodes
rhodesra@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-May-2015
Current Biology
Genetic analysis of the American eel helps explain its decline
The numbers of American eels in freshwater areas have been decreasing rapidly but scientists have been puzzled as to why the fish can't recolonize. Now, a new look at eel genetics published in Current Biology finds that there are differences between eels that feed in freshwater and eels that feed in brackish environments that were previously thought to be genetically interchangeable.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
Reading the Earth's LIPS
An international team of scientists including University of Sydney geophysicists Professor Dietmar Müller, Dr. Simon Williams and Dr. Maria Seton from the School of Geosciences have found a novel way to 'read the Earth's LIPS' -- its Large Igneous Provinces. Their findings are reported in a Nature Geoscience article in which they show for the first time that LIPS have a close working relationship with underwater mountain ranges called mid-ocean ridges.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Nature
Global climate on verge of multi-decadal change
A study, published today in Nature, implies that the global climate is on the verge of a broad-scale change that could last decades. The change is likely to bring drier summers to Britain and Ireland, accelerated sea-level rise along the northeast coast of the USA, and drought in the Sahel region. This new phase could also offer a brief reprise from the rise of global temperatures, as well as fewer hurricanes hitting the USA.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
44-023-805-95000
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Environmental Microbiology
Pinpointing natural cancer drug's true origins brings sustainable production a step closer
For decades, scientists have known that ET-743, a compound extracted from a marine invertebrate called a mangrove tunicate, can kill cancer cells. The drug has been approved for use in patients in Europe and is in clinical trials in the US.
International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups, Fogarty International Center, National Science Foundation, DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Contact: Ian Demsky
idemsky@umich.edu
734-647-9837
University of Michigan

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force releases National Invasive Lionfish Management Plan
An intergovernmental task force just released a new plan to prevent the spread of the invasive lionfish and to help manage lionfish in an effort to prevent further harm to marine ecosystems.

Contact: Connie Barclay
Connie.barclay@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Nature
Invisible helpers of the sea: Marine bacteria boost growth of tiny ocean algae
A common diatom grows faster in the presence of bacteria that release a growth hormone known to benefit plants on land.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Scientific Reports
On the trail of the clever snail
Animals, like humans, excel at some tasks but not others according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports. Researchers from the Universities of Exeter and Aberystwyth used pond snails to investigate learning and memory. They found that if an individual is good at forming memories about food they are poor at forming memories related to predator threat and vice versa.
Leverhulme Trust

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Protecting South America's iconic golden dorado fish
A new study launched this month by University of Massachusetts Amherst fisheries biologist Andy J. Danylchuk, in collaboration with Argentina's Ministry of Environment and regional partners including Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio, Fish Simply, and Patagonia Inc., is the first to assess the impact of catch-and-release fishing and other human and environmental pressures on the golden dorado, a fish of high economic and recreational value across South America.
Patagonia, Inc., Argentina's Ministry of Environment, Juramento Fly Fishing, Tigres del Rio and Fish Simply

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Wrasse project offers production boost to Scottish salmon industry
Aquaculture experts from the University of Stirling, Scotland, are leading the research behind a £4 million project to boost production in the Scottish salmon farming industry. Scientists from the University's internationally acclaimed Institute of Aquaculture have helped to develop the potential of wrasse, a cleaner fish which supports the efficient production of salmon. Stirling researchers are using wrasse as part of a sustainable, integrated pest management strategy.
Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, Marine Harvest, Scottish Sea Farms, BioMar, University of Stirling

Contact: David Christie
david.christie1@stir.ac.uk
01-786-466-653
University of Stirling

Showing releases 6-15 out of 390.

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