Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Researchers at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced the genome of Zostera marina, the very first marine flowering plant ever to receive the treatment. Their findings shed light on how the species adapted from the deep to seas to shallow ponds and back again over hundreds of millions of years. Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: After reviewing more than 52 hours of octopus footage, researchers at Alaska Pacific University and University of Sydney are challenging the prevailing notion that octopi use their color-changing abilities only to hide from predators. They describe a more nuanced interpretation of octopi using color-changing along with body gestures as methods of social communication. Watch some of that video here and read about their research on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 6-15 out of 382.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
PLOS ONE
Study finds fish larvae are better off in groups
A recent study provides new evidence that larvae swim faster, straighter and more consistently in a common direction when together in a group. The research led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is the first to observe group orientation behaviors of larval fish.
OTIC grant from the National Science Foundation.

Contact: Diana Udel
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Winston form
After Tropical Cyclone Winston formed between Vanuatu and Fiji in the Southern Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and saw powerful thunderstorms had quickly developed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
NASA's RapidScat spots newborn Tropical Cyclone Tatiana
As Tropical Cyclone Tatiana was developing in the Coral Sea, east of Queensland, Australia, NASA's RapidScat measured the surface winds in the intensifying tropical cyclone.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
NASA's 2 eyes on Tropical Cyclone Daya
Two of NASA's 'eyes' have been watching Tropical Cyclone Daya and providing data to forecasters. As Tropical Cyclone Daya continued to move away from La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean, NASA's RapidScat instrument and NASA's Aqua satellite gathered visible imagery and infrared temperature data on the developing storm that showed its strength and development.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Frontiers in Microbiology
Herpes outbreak, other marine viruses linked to coral bleaching event
A study has concluded that significant outbreaks of viruses may be associated with coral bleaching events, especially as a result of multiple environmental stresses. One such event was documented even as it happened in a three-day period. It showed how an explosion of three viral groups, including a herpes-like virus, occurred just as corals were bleaching in one part of the Great Barrier Reef off the east coast of Australia.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rebecca Vega-Thurber
Rebecca.vega-thurber@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1851
Oregon State University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Harmful Algae
NOAA, partners: Testing detects algal toxins in Alaska marine mammals
Toxins from harmful algae are present in Alaskan marine food webs in high enough concentrations to be detected in marine mammals such as whales, walruses, sea lions, seals, porpoises and sea otters, according to new research from NOAA and its federal, state, local and academic partners.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Nature
Plankton network linked to ocean's biological carbon pump revealed
The ocean is the largest carbon sink on the planet. The community of planktonic organisms involved in the removal of carbon from the upper layers of the ocean has now been described by oceanographers, biologists and computer scientists, from CNRS, UPMC, Nantes University, VIB, EMBL and CEA. This first overview of the network of species linked to the oceanic biological pump revealed new players as well as the main bacterial functions participating in the process.

Contact: Sooike Stoops
sooike.stoops@vib.be
32-474-289-252
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
ZooKeys
Two new zoantharian species found on eunicid worms in the dark in the Indo-Pacific ocean
While researching the understudied fauna of the genus Epizoanthus in the Indo-Pacific Ocean, Japanese scientists focused on examining species living with eunicid worms, where they form a colony on the outside of the worm's tube. Although these zoantharians often live in areas that are tough to reach, and despite the species tending to be indistinguishable on the outside, the present research, published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, reports the discovery of two new species.

Contact: Hiroki Kise
hkm11sea@yahoo.co.jp
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Fish fins can sense touch
The human fingertip is a finely tuned sensory machine, and even slight touches convey a great deal of information about our physical environment. It turns out, some fish use their pectoral fins in pretty much the same way. And do so through a surprisingly similar biological mechanism to mammals -- humans included.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
NASA sees development of Tropical Storm 11P in Southwestern Pacific
The tropical low pressure area previously known as System 97P has developed into a tropical storm named 11P in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 6-15 out of 382.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>