Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 6-15 out of 379.

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Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
Hear no evil: Farmed fish found to be hard of hearing
New research published today in the journal Scientific Reports has revealed for the first time that half of the world's farmed fish have hearing loss due to a deformity of the earbone.

Contact: Nerissa Hannink
nhannink@unimelb.edu.au
61-430-588-055
University of Melbourne

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Journal of Comparative Neurology
Scientists establish first map of the sea lion brain
Despite considerable evidence for the California sea lion's intelligence, very little is known about how their brain is organized. Now, a team of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University has taken an important step toward uncovering this mystery by conducting the first comprehensive study of the California sea lion's central nervous system, concentrating on the somatosensory system, which is concerned with conscious perception of touch, pressure, pain, temperature, position and vibration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Protecting diversity on coral reefs: DNA may hold the key
Research published today by a team of scientists discovered that large areas of intact coral reef with extensive live coral cover, not disturbed by humans or climate change, harbor the greatest amount of genetic diversity. With this work, the researchers uncovered a link between species diversity of an ecosystem and the genetic diversity encoded within the DNA of those species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Deep-sea biodiversity impacted by climate change's triple threat
A new study found that vulnerability of deep-sea biodiversity to climate change's triple threat -- rising water temperatures, and decreased oxygen, and pH levels -- is not uniform across the world's oceans.

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
New book by ecologist James Estes recounts pioneering research in Alaska
In his new book, 'Serendipity,' marine ecologist James Estes recounts the simple twists of fate that sent him to the Aleutian Islands in 1970 to study the distribution and abundance of sea otters. It was the start of a remarkable journey of discovery that led to profound insights about the complexity of ecological interactions and the importance of predators in natural ecosystems.

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Widespread loss of ocean oxygen to become noticeable in 2030s
A reduction in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large regions of the oceans between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Laura Snider
lsnider@ucar.edu
303-497-8605
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
That's amore, FAU ocean drone first to identify grouper mating calls in spawning season
Just as the sun begins to set, for just a couple of months, hundreds to thousands of groupers gather at their favorite hangouts along the shelf breaks in the southeast United States, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Basin to spawn -- and luckily they're pretty vocal about it, providing vital data on their reproductive behaviors as well as their favorite mating spots.
NOAA, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Foundation

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Coral 'toolkit' allows floating larvae to transform into reef skeletons
In a study published today, researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Rutgers University, and the University of Haifa identified key and novel components of the molecular 'toolkit' that allow corals to build their skeletons (called biomineralization) and described when -- in the transformation from floating larvae to coral skeleton -- these components are used.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marcie Workman
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Journal of Environmental Quality
Bioreactors ready for the big time
Bioreactors are passive filtration systems that can reduce nitrate losses from farm fields. Most bioreactors are simple pits filled with wood chips; bacteria on the wood chips remove 25 to 45 percent of the nitrate in runoff water. Research summarized in a special issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality highlights their potential applications and provides insight into design options.

Contact: Lauren Quinn
ldquinn@illinois.edu
217-300-2435
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
We share a molecular armor with coral reefs
A new study published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B has found that one particular molecule found in reef ecosystems plays a similar immunological role in corals as it does in humans. From an evolutionary standpoint, this suggests the molecule's immune function dates back at least 550 million years.
National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education, National Science Foundation Dimensions, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Cystic Fibrosis Research Inc

Contact: Michael Price
mprice@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-0389
San Diego State University

Showing releases 6-15 out of 379.

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