Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 61-70 out of 278.

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Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Pharmacological Reviews
Fish peptide could help in battle against cardiovascular disease
A major international review of a peptide originally found in fish that could be used in the battle against cardiovascular disease has been published. Professor David Lambert from the University of Leicester's Department of Cardiovascular Sciences contributed to the review.

Contact: David Lambert
dgl3@leicester.ac.uk
01-162-523-161
University of Leicester

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Physical Review Letters
They see flow signals: Researchers identify nature of fish's 'sixth sense'
A team of scientists has identified how a 'sixth sense' in fish allows them to detect flows of water, which helps resolve a long-standing mystery about how these aquatic creatures respond to their environment.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
China's water stress set to worsen with transfer initiatives
New research paints a grim picture for the future of China's water supply, as its booming economy continues to heap pressure on its natural resources, according to scientists at the University of East Anglia, the University of Leeds and other international institutions. The findings are published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.
Economic and Social Research Council, Philip Leverhulme Prize, University of Leeds Cheney Fellowship, Worldwide Universities Network

Contact: Laura Potts
press@uea.ac.uk
44-160-359-3007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UCLA-led study shows how meltwater on Greenland's ice sheet contribute to rising sea levels
Using satellite and field work after an extreme melt event in Greenland, a UCLA-led study finds that melt-prone areas on its ice sheet develop a remarkably efficient drainage system of stunning blue streams and rivers that carry meltwater into moulins (sinkholes) and ultimately the ocean. However, the team's measurements at the ice's edge show that climate models alone can overestimate the volume of meltwater flowing to the ocean if they fail to account for water storage beneath the ice.

Contact: Meg Sullivan
msullivan@support.ucla.edu
310-825-1046
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Reviews in Fish­eries Sci­ence & Aqua­cul­ture
Recreational fishing in the Mediterranean is more harmful than previously thought
A total of 10 percent of adults living in developed countries practice recreational fishing, which in the Mediterranean Sea represents around 10 percent of the total production of fisheries. Despite its importance, this fishing is not as controlled or studied as professional fishing. For the first time, a study examines this activity, whose effects are increasingly more similar to traditional fishing. For this reason, scientists demand greater control.

Contact: SINC Team
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
The devil is in the detail
Researchers have looked at a species of fish to help unravel one of the biggest mysteries in evolutionary biology.

Contact: Rachael Fergusson
rachael.fergusson@monash.edu
61-399-034-841
Monash University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Oceanography
Surviving typhoons
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology researcher Mary Grossmann studied micro-organisms during three typhoons to figure out what happened to the ocean's tiny creatures when the waters churn.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Fish Biology
Scientists document longest-ever case of sperm storage in sharks
Steinhart Aquarium biologists at the California Academy of Sciences were taken aback when a shark egg case dropped by an adult bamboo shark, who spent nearly 4 years isolated from males, showed signs of healthy development. Their results, published in the Journal of Fish Biology, mark the longest documented case of sperm storage in any species of shark, and highlight a bright bit of news for the future of wild sharks threatened by overfishing and habitat loss.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Nature Plants
Algae use same molecular machinery as land plants to respond to a plant hormone
Land-based plants -- including the fruits and vegetables in your kitchen -- produce and respond to hormones in order to survive. Scientists once believed that hormone signaling machinery only existed in these relatively complex plants. But new research from the University of Maryland shows that some types of freshwater algae can also detect ethylene gas -- the same stress hormone found in land plants -- and might use these signals to adapt to changing environmental conditions.
National Science Foundation, Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, Belgian American Educational Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, American Society of Plant Biologists

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Ecosphere
Algae blooms create their own favorable conditions, new study finds
Fertilizers are known to promote the growth of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater and oceans worldwide, but a new multi-institution study shows the aquatic microbes themselves can drive nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in a combined one-two punch in lakes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Showing releases 61-70 out of 278.

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