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Blub blub blub Marine protected areas are a crucial part of preserving biodiversity. Track and analyze them by country and location with MPAtlas. This resource is provided by the Marine Conservation Institute.
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Video: A juvenile whale shark cruises over the shallow reef shelf of the South Ari Marine Protected Area. At 42km2 S.A.MPA is the largest Marine Protected Area in the Maldives and one of the few places in the world where whale sharks can be encountered all year round. See the video, from The Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme, here.
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Calendar of Events >>> Full Listing

September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruņa, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 61-70 out of 359.

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Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
U-Michigan Water Center to help lead national estuary research program
The University of Michigan Water Center has been awarded a five-year, $20 million cooperative-agreement contract to join the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in overseeing research at a nationwide network of 28 coastal reserves. Less than two years after it was launched, the U-M Water Center is extending its reach beyond the Upper Midwest to help coordinate, with NOAA, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System's collaborative science program.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Bernie DeGroat
bernied@umich.edu
743-764-7260
University of Michigan

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Estuaries and Coasts
Project serves up big data to guide managing nation's coastal waters
In this week's edition of Estuaries and Coasts, a Michigan State University doctoral student joins with others to give a sweeping assessment to understand how human activities are affecting estuaries, the nation's sounds, bays, gulfs and bayous.
National Fish Habitat Partnership

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Ocean warming could drive heavy rain bands toward the poles
In a world warmed by rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, precipitation patterns are going to change because of two factors: one, warmer air can hold more water; and two, changing atmospheric circulation patterns will shift where rain falls. According to previous model research, mid- to high-latitude precipitation is expected to increase by as much as 50 percent. Yet the reasons why models predict this are hard to tease out.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Did an exceptional iceberg sink the Titanic?
While the sinking of the Titanic in 1912 is typically blamed on human, design and construction errors, a new Significance paper points to two other unfavorable factors outside human control: there were a greater number of icebergs than normal that year, and weather conditions had driven them further south, and earlier in the year, than was usual.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
ZooKeys
Unraveling the mysteries of the Red Sea: A new reef coral species from Saudi Arabia
A new hard coral species Pachyseris inattesa is described from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Although the Red Sea is famous as an important region of marine biodiversity it has remained deeply understudied and we are still to discover its innermost secrets. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Tullia I. Terraneo
tulliaisotta.terraneo@kaust.edu.sa
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Older coral species more hardy, UT Arlington biologists say
An examination of disease patterns in 14 species of Caribbean corals facing stressors like climate change and pollution shows older species are faring better. The newly-published research could give clues about what coral reefs will look like in the future.
National Science Foundation, NOAA

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
NASA sees no punch left in Tropical Storm Julio
Tropical Storm Julio doesn't have any strong thunderstorms or strong convection left in it according to infrared satellite imagery from NASA.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
NASA satellite spots a weakening Karina, now a tropical storm
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Karina before it weakened to a tropical storm early on Aug. 15 and imagery showed the vertical wind shear was already taking its toll.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Julio now far from Hawaii
Hurricane Julio moved past the Hawaiian Islands like a car on a highway in the distance, and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm, now downgraded to a tropical storm located more than 700 miles away. Julio is far enough away from Hawaii so that there are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
NASA sees fragmented thunderstorm bands wrapped around Tropical Storm Karina
Although Tropical Storm Karina is still strengthening in the Eastern Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a large band of fragmented thunderstorms wrapping into its center from the north.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 61-70 out of 359.

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