Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

New research from the University of Washington and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory links the brightness of clouds in the sky to airbone gasses produced by plankton all the way down on the ocean floor. Read about their research published in Science Advances on EurekAlert!.

Video: Gas hydrates found in Arctic continental shelf sediments behave like ice with a very notable exception: they burn! Check out a video of CAGE researchers demonstrating here!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 61-70 out of 437.

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Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Climate Change
Why offspring cope better with climate change -- it's all in the genes!
In a world first study, researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have unlocked the genetic mystery of why some fish are able to adjust to warming oceans. In a collaborative project with scientists from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, the researchers examined how the fish's genes responded after several generations living at higher temperatures predicted under climate change.
Australian Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Ecology from treetop to bedrock: Human influence in Earth's critical zone
In the narrow space between treetops and bedrock is a critical zone holding all of the life-sustaining resources supporting terrestrial life on earth. At an organized session on Critical Zone Ecology at the 100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, ecologists will describe how they work with geologists, hydrologists, climate scientists, and others to expand the disciplinary dimensions of their understanding of watersheds.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nangka moving into Sea of Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nangka after it made landfall and was moving into the Sea of Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
'PlankZooka' larval sampler may revolutionize deep-ocean research
Scientists have conducted the first high-volume collection of deep-ocean plankton, including animal larvae, using a robotic sampling device mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle. The new device allows researchers to sample precise areas, at depth, for long periods of time, while gently filtering enough volume to collect rare organisms without damaging them. Researchers from Duke, Oregon and Woods Hole deployed the large-tubed device, nicknamed Plankzooka, earlier this month.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees thunderstorms flaring up on Halola's eastern side
NASA infrared satellite imagery taken early on July 17 shows strong thunderstorms on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Halola.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Dolores weakening
Hurricane Dolores weakened to a tropical storm early on July 17 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and gathered infrared information about the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Tropical storm Enrique re-classified as a Tropical Storm
Although it appeared that Tropical Storm Enrique had weakened to a tropical depression, satellite data revealed that there was still some punch left in the system and it was re-classified a tropical storm on July 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Centuries-old shipwreck discovered off North Carolina coast
Researchers have discovered a centuries-old shipwreck off the coast of North Carolina. Artifacts around the wreck, including bricks, bottles and navigation gear, appear to date it to the late 18th or early 19th century. Scientists from Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of Oregon and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution were on an NSF-funded expedition using sonar scanning technology and the submersible vessel Alvin.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
ZooKeys
A fish too deep for science
Scientists from the Smithsonian Institution describe a new goby fish species that lives deeper than its closest relatives and had gone unnoticed up until now. It has been discovered between 70 and 80 m in the southern Caribbean as part of the institution's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP). The species was named in recognition of the Curasub submersible used in the exploration. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Carole Baldwin
baldwinc@si.edu
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
Summertime plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead.
NASA, US Department of Energy, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Showing releases 61-70 out of 437.

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