Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video:Corals that have adapted to live in the hottest seas might now find themselves in danger due to global warming, according University of Southampton researchers. Learn more from Professor Jörg Wiedenmann in this video and on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-85 out of 378.

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Public Release: 7-May-2015
Evolution
Evolution in action: Mate competition weeds out GM fish from population
Purdue University research found that wild-type zebrafish consistently beat out genetically modified Glofish in competition for female mates, an advantage that led to the disappearance of the transgene from the fish population over time. The study, the first to demonstrate evolutionary outcomes in the laboratory, showed that mate competition trumps mate choice in determining natural selection.
US Department of Agriculture's Biotechnology Risk Assessment Grants Program

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Noul continues to intensify as it nears Luzon
Typhoon Noul, which in the Philippines has been designated by Dodong, is located 666 miles east southeast of Manila, Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-May-2015
The American Naturalist
Fish born in larger groups develop more social skills and a different brain 'architecture'
New research on a highly social fish shows that those reared in larger social groups from the earliest stage of life develop increased social skills and a brain shape, or 'neuroplasticity,' which lingers into the later life of the fish.

Contact: Stefan Fischer
sf532@cam.ac.uk
44-122-333-6673
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Typhoon Noul beginning to strengthen in the West Pacific
Since its formation as a tropical depression three days ago, Typhoon Noul has taken on a general westward motion while steadily working its way across the central-west Pacific.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Tropical disturbance in the North Atlantic likely to develop
Although the non-tropical low pressure system in the North Atlantic has moved little during the past several hours it has become better defined with increasing organization of the associated thunderstorm activity.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Tropical Depression 93W forms near Micronesia
Tropical Depression 93W formed on May 6, 2015, trailing on the heels of Typhoon Noul.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Not so cold-blooded creatures
A new study demonstrates certain warm-blooded fishes can swim faster and farther than their cold-blooded counterparts.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Micronesia warnings cancelled for Noul, Philippines next up
Typhoon Noul is currently moving west and will veer west-northwest, then later northwest. It is predicted that the storm will steadily intensify to 125 knots over the next three days. The projected trajectory will see Noul pass northeast of the Philippine Islands, whilst veering north towards Taiwan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Sea lion strandings -- The view from the rookery
NOAA Fisheries wildlife biologist Sharon Melin describes conditions at the sea lion rookeries on the Channel Islands, where pups are going hungry because unusually warm water along the Pacific coast has made it more difficult for their mothers to find food.

Contact: jennie lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Research Solutions for Aquaculture
Bigelow Laboratory exploring collaborations to enhance Maine's aquaculture competitiveness
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences is hosting 50+ people involved in Maine's aquaculture industry on May 26 to explore how research and industry might join together to increase the resilience and international competitiveness of Maine's shellfish, finfish, and algal (both micro and macro) aquaculture businesses. The program will run from 9:30 am - 3:00 pm at the Laboratory's East Boothbay Ocean Science and Education Campus.

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Showing releases 76-85 out of 378.

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