Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

In early August of this year, University of Washington biologist Peter Ward encountered an example of the extremely rare nautilus Allonautilus scrobiculatus. Considered by Ward potentially one of the rarest species in the world, not a single one has been seen since Ward's first expedition over three decades past in 1984. Read about his latest expedition on EurekAlert!.

Video: Over the course of a study started in the late 60s, UC Santa Cruz researchers have discovered for the first time the purpose of the elephant seal's bizarre vocalizations. Listen to them here and find out what they mean on EurekAlert!

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 81-90 out of 486.

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Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in 3 decades
In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers one of the world's rarest animals, a remote encounter that may become even more infrequent if illegal fishing practices continue.
National Geographic Society, Tiffany & Co. Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Nature
Debut of the global mix-master
The Atlantic Circumpolar Current encircles Antarctica with a constant eastward flow in the Southern Ocean. Researchers determined that it originated 30 million years ago, several million years after the tectonic opening of a deep-water channel in the Tasmanian gateway. The Tasmanian gateway was initially the conduit for westward current flow, but as the gateway migrated north tectonically, it eventually aligned with the mid-latitude westerly winds and effected the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Erika inside and outside
NASA's GPM and NOAA's GOES satellite provided views at the newborn Atlantic storm's rainfall and cloud extent.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA sees Hurricane Loke moving north
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Loke as it continued moving north in the Central Pacific early on Aug. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
GPM sees energetic Tropical Depression Kilo
Rainfall associated with Tropical Depression Kilo recently dumped heavy rain in some areas of the state of Hawaii.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA's Terra Satellite sees birth of Tropical Depression 12E
The twelfth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season was born today, Aug. 25, 2015, as NASA's Terra satellite flew overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Goni cover southern half of Sea of Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Goni after it moved out of the East China Sea and north into the Sea of Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Nova Southeastern University researcher and collaborators receive $1.1 million grant
Researchers are finding the hybrid corals are more resilient than their parents, and they are studying why and if this can help aid in coral reef restoration and preservation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
ZooKeys
New Indonesian crayfish species escapes the decor market to become a freedom fighter
It might have been an unknown ornamental fish collector and dealer that captured the motley crayfish species C. snowden for the first time by the coasts of the island of New Guinea, but it was the German research team, led by Christian Lukhaup who were the first to recognize, compare, prove it as a new species and give it a name after a controversial 'American freedom fighter.' Their work is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Christian Lukhaup
craykeeper@gmx.de
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
mBio
Hepatitis A-like virus identified in seals
Scientists in the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered a new virus in seals that is the closest known relative of the human hepatitis A virus. The finding provides new clues on the emergence of hepatitis A. The research appears in the July/August issue of mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Tim Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Showing releases 81-90 out of 486.

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