Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

A recent paper in the Journal of Physical Oceanography details the specific challenges posed by the many millions of tons of plastic dumped into the ocean every years. The findings indicate that solving the problem may have complicating factors beyond just raw scale (4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of dumped in 2015 alone). Read about the research on EurekAlert!.

Video: New Princeton University research proves that ocean currents can move particles like phytoplankton and plastic debris all the way across the world in significantly less time than previously thought. Find out how in this video and on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 81-90 out of 392.

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Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Ecology Letters
Marine reserves are critical for coral reef resilience
Due to the combined effect of human and natural disturbances, coral reefs are declining at an alarming rate.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Microbes take center stage in workings of 'the river's liver'
Scientists have found evidence that rising river waters deliver a feast of carbon to hungry microbes where water meets land, triggering increased activity and altering the flow of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
UOG scientists seek genetic reasons for coral reef survival
Coral reefs around the world are increasingly under threat from coral bleaching which destroys colonies and interrupts the food chain they support. Scientists at the University of Guam Marine Laboratory are using a new genetic sequencer to search for the biological mechanisms that allow some colonies to survive and thrive while others die.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Laura Biggs
laura.guamepscor@gmail.com
University of Guam

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Marine preserve to help penguins in a 'predictably unpredictable' place
New regulations by the government of Ecuador to protect the waters around the Galapagos Islands as a marine preserve, including main feeding areas for Galapagos penguins.

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Royal Society Open Science
Invasive species not best conservation tool: Study
Harnessing an invasive fish species sounded like a promising conservation tool to help reverse the destruction wreaked by zebra mussels on endangered native mollusks in the Great Lakes -- except that it won't work, says a University of Guelph ecologist.

Contact: Joe Ackerman
ackerman@uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 x58268
University of Guelph

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Crab shell signaling helps control the many faces of cholera, study shows
A new study of more than 50 samples of Vibrio cholerae isolated from both patients and the environment demonstrates the diversity and resourcefulness of the organism.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
NSB announces Public Service Award recipient
Today the National Science Board announced that Sea Education Association would be bestowed with its 2016 Public Service Award. This esteemed award honors exemplary public service in promoting public understanding of science and engineering. SEA is the sole recipient of the Public Service Award this year.

Contact: Brandon Powell
bjpowell@nsf.gov
703-292-2769
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
How deep does life go? MBL study describes microbial neighborhood beneath ocean floor
A team led by MBL Associate Scientist Julie Huber offers the first description of an active microbial community buried in cold oceanic crust at North Pond, an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
NASA's GPM views Tropical Cyclone Zena hitting Vanuatu
Tropical Cyclone Zena, formerly known as Tropical Cyclone 18P formed in the South Pacific Ocean near Vanuatu early on April 5, 2016. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory satellite flew directly above the newly formed tropical cyclone and measured rainfall and cloud heights in the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Journal of Insect Science
Nanopillars on drone fly larvae allow them to avoid bacterial contamination
Rat-tailed maggots are known to live in stagnant, fetid water that is rich in bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, they are able to avoid infection by these microorganisms due to nanopillars on their cuticles.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Showing releases 81-90 out of 392.

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