Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Around 2005, southern right whale calves off the coast of Argentina began dieing off at an unprecented rate (from 6 per year in 2005 to around 65 per year from 2005 to 2014). Scientists have never determined the cause until a recent Marine Mammal Science paper named a likely culprit: toxic algae blooms. Read about the new findings on EurekAlert!.

Video: Electric eels may be some of the most sophisticated marine predators in the animal kingdom, according to a recent Current Biology paper by Vanderbilt University researchers. Check out video of them in action here and read about their specialized hunting techniques on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

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Showing releases 81-90 out of 512.

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Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: The Fundao Dam, cyanobacteria, and three new research papers
This week from AGU are papers on the Fundao Dam, cyanobacteria, and three new research papers.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
$4.2 million NSF grant helps biologist gather large-scale river measurements
Walter Dodds, university distinguished professor of biology, is part of a collaborative five-year, $4.2 million National Science Foundation project to better understand how climate change affects river systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Walter Dodds
Kansas State University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Southern right whale calf wounding by kelp gulls increased to nearly all over 4 decades
Wounding of southern right whale calves and mothers by kelp gulls has increased from 2 percent to 99 percent over four decades, according to a study published Oct. 21, 2015, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carina Marón from the University of Utah and colleagues.

Contact: Kayla Graham

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Thermal sensitivity of marine communities reveals the most vulnerable to global warming
The sensitivity of marine communities to ocean warming rather than rising ocean temperatures will have strong short-term impacts on biodiversity changes associated with global warming, according to new research.
Australian Research Council, Marine Biodiversity Hub

Contact: Glenn Harris
University of Southampton

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Lakes resist the introduction of new fish
Research from Umeå University in Sweden presents a new method of establishing how freshwater fish can defend themselves against an invasion of a new fish species. The method takes into account that resident species in a lake contribute at a varying degree to the resistance of the new species.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
Umea University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
NASA spots Kate speeding away from the Bahamas
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellite both saw strong thunderstorms circling Tropical Storm Kate's center of circulation as the storm sped away from the Bahamas.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees landfall for Tropical Cyclone Megh
Tropical Cyclone Megh became the second tropical cyclone to make landfall in Yemen in one week. As Megh began land falling just north of Aden, Yemen, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the tropical storm over the southeastern coast.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Study unlocks faster way to assess ocean ecosystem health
A new study published today identifies a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on. Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species -- so responders can act quickly to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Acta Biomaterialia
Sea urchin spurs new ideas for lightweight materials
Materials researchers love sea creatures. Mother-of-pearl provokes ideas for smooth surfaces, clams inspire gluey substances, shark's skin is used to develop materials that reduce drag in water, and so on. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Chemistry have now found a model for strong, lightweight materials by diving below the sea surface to investigate a sea urchin cousin known as the heart urchin.

Contact: Jes Andersen
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Nature Geoscience
Northern lakes act as CO2 chimneys in a warming world
Many of the world's approximately 117 million lakes act as wet chimneys releasing large amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, CO2, into the atmosphere. The most recent estimates show that CO2 emissions from the world's lakes, water courses and reservoirs are equivalent to almost a quarter of all the carbon dioxide produced by burning fossil fuels.

Contact: Gesa Weyhenmeyer
Uppsala University

Showing releases 81-90 out of 512.

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