Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 81-90 out of 310.

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Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
eLife
Make like a squid and transform
A new study from Tel Aviv University showcases the first example of an animal editing its own genetic makeup on-the-fly to modify most of its proteins, enabling adjustments to its immediate surroundings.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientific Reports
High seas fishing ban could boost global catches, equality
Analysis of fisheries data indicates that if increased spillover of fish stocks from protected international waters were to boost coastal catches by 18 per cent, current global catches would be maintained. When the researchers modeled less conservative estimates of stock spillover, catches in coastal waters surpassed current global levels.
Global Ocean Commission, OceanCanada, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Pew Charitable Trusts, Conservation International

Contact: Rashid Sumaila
r.sumaila@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-351-7406
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New techniques reveal how microbes shape the health and biodiversity of oceans
Three leading experts will share their recent findings on the role of microbes in ocean ecosystems at an AAAS symposium Feb. 13 entitled 'Seeing the Invisible: How Sequencing Diverse Eukaryotes Transforms Ocean Science.'

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Scientific Reports
Study recommends closing the high seas to fishing
The high seas globally should be closed to fishing argues a new study in the journal Scientific Reports, co-authored by Isabelle Côté, a Simon Fraser University professor of marine ecology and conservation. 'Intense fishing in the high seas,' says Côté, an SFU Department of Biological Sciences researcher, 'has resulted in habitat destruction and declining stocks of fish such as tunas and swordfishes.'

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
NOAA announces new National Saltwater Recreational Fisheries Policy
Today at the annual Progressive® Insurance Miami Boat Show, NOAA Fisheries Administrator Eileen Sobeck announced a new national policy to better serve America's 11 million recreational saltwater anglers and the companies and communities that rely on them. Recreational fishing is an important national pastime that supports 381,000 jobs and generates in $58 billion in annual sales impacts, according to a NOAA 2012 report.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
An ocean of plastic
Ocean currents have been carrying floating debris into all five of the world's major oceanic gyres for decades. The rotating currents of these so-called 'garbage patches' create vortexes of trash, much of it plastic. However, exactly how much plastic is making its way into the world's oceans and from where it originates has been a mystery -- until now.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Diversity and Distributions
Critical green turtle habitats identified in Mediterranean
A new study led by the University of Exeter has identified two major foraging grounds of the Mediterranean green turtle and recommends the creation of a new Marine Protected Area to preserve the vulnerable species.

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
How much plastic debris moves from land to sea?
Researchers suggest that the world's coastal communities generated close to 275 million tons of plastic waste in 2010 -- and that 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of that plastic made its way to the oceans. They also warn that the cumulative amount of ocean-bound plastic could increase more than tenfold in the next ten years unless global infrastructure is improved.
The Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New study in Science calculates amount of plastic waste going into the ocean
The study, co-authored by Kara Lavender Law of Sea Education Association and principal investigator of the NCEAS marine debris working group, reported in the Feb. 13 edition of the journal Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline. That year, a total of 275 million metric tons of plastic waste was generated in those 192 coastal countries.

Contact: Kara Lavender Law
klavender@sea.edu
508-444-1935
Sea Education Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Science
New Science paper calculates magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean
How much mismanaged plastic waste is making its way from land to ocean has been a decades-long guessing game. Now, the University of Georgia's Jenna Jambeck and her National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis working group colleagues have put a number on the global problem. Their study, reported in Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline.
Marine Debris Working Group at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Showing releases 81-90 out of 310.

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