Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Using the spread of infectious diseases as a model, a University of Utah researcher has shone new light on how humans first settled the islands of the Pacific some 3,500 years ago. Read about what his discoveries on EurekAlert! here.


Video: Research by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers has shed some light on exactly how octopuses manage their uniquely unusual biology. Check out some detailed videos of their work here and here, then read about it on EurekAlert!.
The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

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Showing releases 86-95 out of 393.

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Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Bacteria play an important role in the long term storage of carbon in the ocean
The ocean is a large reservoir of dissolved organic molecules, and many of these molecules are stable against microbial utilization for hundreds to thousands of years. They contain a similar amount of carbon as compared to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, the University of South Carolina and the Helmholtz Centre Munich found answers to questions about the origin of these persistent molecules in a study published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Dr. Oliver Lechtenfeld
oliver.lechtenfeld@ufz.de
49-341-235-1020
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
NASA sees Maysak become a super typhoon
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Typhoon Maysak as it strengthened into a super typhoon on March 31, reaching Category 5 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature
The 'intraterrestrials': New viruses discovered in ocean depths
The intraterrestrials, they might be called. Strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than the viruses that inhabit deep ocean methane seeps and prey on single-celled microorganisms called archaea.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Scientists discover elusive secret of how continents formed
An international research team, led by a Virginia Tech geoscientist, has revealed information about how continents were generated on Earth more than 2.5 billion years ago -- and how those processes have continued within the last 70 million years to profoundly affect the planet's life and climate.

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Discovery of 2 new species of primitive fishes
Working with an international team, paleontologists at the University of Zurich have discovered two new species of Saurichthys. The ~242 million year old predatory fishes were found in the fossil Lagerstätte Monte San Giorgio, in Ticino. They are distinct from previously known Saurichthys species in the shape of the head and body, suggesting different habitats and diet.

Contact: Dr. Heinz Furrer
heinz.furrer-paleo@bluewin.ch
41-793-282-666
University of Zurich

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Geology
UNH geologist identifies new source of methane for gas hydrates in Arctic
Researchers have identified a new source of methane for gas hydrates -- ice-like substances found in sediment that trap methane within the crystal structure of frozen water -- in the Arctic Ocean. The findings, published online now in the May 2015 journal Geology, point to a previously undiscovered, stable reservoir for methane that is 'locked' away from the atmosphere, where it could impact global climate change.
Research Council of Norway, US Department of Energy

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Massive study is first to explore historical ocean response to abrupt climate change
A new study reports that marine ecosystems can take thousands, rather than hundreds, of years to recover from climate-related upheavals. The study's authors -- including Peter Roopnarine, Ph.D., of the California Academy of Sciences -- analyzed thousands of invertebrate fossils to show that ecosystem recovery from climate change and seawater deoxygenation might take place on a millennial scale.
National Science Foundation, UC Multicampus Research Programs and Initiatives, UC Davis REACH IGERT, Mia Tegner Historical Ecology Grant, EPA STAR Fellowship, Switzer Environmental Fellowship

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
NASA's ISS-RapidScat sees Typhoon Maysak's stronger winds become more uniform
A tropical cyclone does not always have consistently strong winds all the way around it, and NASA's ISS-RapidScat instrument confirmed that was the case with Typhoon Maysak as it was strengthening in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Over the course of three days, As the tropical cyclone strengthened, RapidScat saw strongest sustained winds around Typhoon Maysak expand and spread from the northern quadrant to other quadrants of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Equatorial fish babies in hot water
Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
GeoBiology
New research identifies diverse sources of methane in shallow Arctic lakes
New research into the changing ecology of thousands of shallow lakes on the North Slope of Alaska suggests that in scenarios of increasing global temperatures, methane-generating microbes, found in thawing lake sediments, may ramp up production of the potent greenhouse gas -- which has a global warming potential 25 times greater than carbon dioxide.
NASA/Astrobiology Institute, Astrobiology of Icy Worlds Program, NASA/Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets Award

Contact: Justin Broglio
justin.broglio@dri.edu
775-673-7610
Desert Research Institute

Showing releases 86-95 out of 393.

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