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Blub blub blub Marine protected areas are a crucial part of preserving biodiversity. Track and analyze them by country and location with MPAtlas. This resource is provided by the Marine Conservation Institute.
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Video: A juvenile whale shark cruises over the shallow reef shelf of the South Ari Marine Protected Area. At 42km2 S.A.MPA is the largest Marine Protected Area in the Maldives and one of the few places in the world where whale sharks can be encountered all year round. See the video, from The Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme, here.
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September 15 to 19, 2014
ICES Annual Science Conference 2014
A Coruņa, Spain

Underwater
The ICES Annual Science Conference is a forum for an international community of marine scientists, professionals, and students to share their work in theme-based series of oral and poster presentations. The 2014 conference will include talks by three invited keynote speakers, and oral and poster presentations selected on the basis of submitted abstracts.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 86-95 out of 347.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong's 'best side'
NASA satellite data showed Tropical Storm Halong's 'best side' or most powerful side was east of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA finds heavy rainfall and wind shear in newborn Tropical Storm Bertha
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM found rain was falling heavily in the Atlantic Ocean's second tropical storm of the hurricane season. Bertha was close to the Lesser Antilles, prompting warnings and watches.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
A train of 5 tropical cyclones in the Central and Eastern Pacific
A train of developing tropical low pressure areas stretch from the Eastern Pacific Ocean into the Central Pacific and they were captured in an image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 1. The train of five tropical lows include the remnants of Tropical Storm Genevieve and newly developed Tropical Storm Iselle.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA eyes powerful bands of thunderstorms in newborn Tropical Storm Iselle
Tropical Storm Iselle was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean soon after NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery on the storm that showed powerful thunderstorms wrapping into developing storm's center. Iselle is not close enough to land to cause any watches or warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Scientists warn time to stop drilling in the dark
The co-authors of a new study, including two Simon Fraser University research associates, cite new reasons why scientists, industry representatives and policymakers must collaborate closely on minimizing damage to the natural world from shale gas development. Viorel Popescu and Maureen Ryan, David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellows in SFU's Biological Sciences department, are among eight international co-authors of the newly published research in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Geology
Symbiotic survival
One of the most diverse families in the ocean today -- marine bivalve mollusks known as Lucinidae (or lucinids) -- originated more than 400 million years ago in the Silurian period, with adaptations and life habits like those of its modern members. This Geology study by Steven Stanley of the University of Hawaii, published online on July 25, 2014, tracks the remarkable evolutionary expansion of the lucinids through significant symbiotic relationships.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods
This NOAA-funded research, which used a new approach to study one of the most important commercial tuna species in the Atlantic, provides the longest available fishery-independent record of bigeye tuna movements to date. Data should help researchers to further characterize habitat use and assess the need for more monitoring in high-catch areas.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems
The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans on July 31.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong move northwest of Guam
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite passed over Guam as heavy rain fell over the island while Tropical Storm Halong's center passed just to the north of the island.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Frontiers in Microbiology
Gulf oil spill researcher: Bacteria ate some toxins, but worst remain
A Florida State University researcher found that bacteria in the Gulf of Mexico consumed many of the toxic components of the oil released during the Deepwater Horizon spill in the months after the spill, but not the most toxic contaminants.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Showing releases 86-95 out of 347.

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