Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 91-100 out of 314.

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Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
NOAA announces new National Saltwater Recreational Fisheries Policy
Today at the annual Progressive® Insurance Miami Boat Show, NOAA Fisheries Administrator Eileen Sobeck announced a new national policy to better serve America's 11 million recreational saltwater anglers and the companies and communities that rely on them. Recreational fishing is an important national pastime that supports 381,000 jobs and generates in $58 billion in annual sales impacts, according to a NOAA 2012 report.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
An ocean of plastic
Ocean currents have been carrying floating debris into all five of the world's major oceanic gyres for decades. The rotating currents of these so-called 'garbage patches' create vortexes of trash, much of it plastic. However, exactly how much plastic is making its way into the world's oceans and from where it originates has been a mystery -- until now.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Diversity and Distributions
Critical green turtle habitats identified in Mediterranean
A new study led by the University of Exeter has identified two major foraging grounds of the Mediterranean green turtle and recommends the creation of a new Marine Protected Area to preserve the vulnerable species.

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
How much plastic debris moves from land to sea?
Researchers suggest that the world's coastal communities generated close to 275 million tons of plastic waste in 2010 -- and that 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of that plastic made its way to the oceans. They also warn that the cumulative amount of ocean-bound plastic could increase more than tenfold in the next ten years unless global infrastructure is improved.
The Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New study in Science calculates amount of plastic waste going into the ocean
The study, co-authored by Kara Lavender Law of Sea Education Association and principal investigator of the NCEAS marine debris working group, reported in the Feb. 13 edition of the journal Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline. That year, a total of 275 million metric tons of plastic waste was generated in those 192 coastal countries.

Contact: Kara Lavender Law
klavender@sea.edu
508-444-1935
Sea Education Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Science
New Science paper calculates magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean
How much mismanaged plastic waste is making its way from land to ocean has been a decades-long guessing game. Now, the University of Georgia's Jenna Jambeck and her National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis working group colleagues have put a number on the global problem. Their study, reported in Science, found between 4.8 and 12.7 million metric tons of plastic entered the ocean in 2010 from people living within 50 kilometers of the coastline.
Marine Debris Working Group at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, Ocean Conservancy

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Cell
A new model organism for aging research: The short-lived African killifish
Studying aging and its associated diseases has been challenging because existing vertebrate models (e.g., mice) are relatively long lived, while short-lived invertebrate species (e.g., yeast and worms) lack key features present in humans. Stanford University scientists have found a new middle ground with the development of a genome-editing toolkit to study aging in the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Automatic Whale Detector, version 1.0
Scientists have combined infrared cameras with image recognition software to automatically detect and count migrating gray whales. This technology will increase the accuracy of gray whale abundance estimates.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Contact: Rich Press
rich.press@noaa.gov
301-427-8530
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Earth's Future
Monster hurricanes reached US Northeast during prehistoric periods of ocean warming
Intense hurricanes possibly more powerful than any storms New England has experienced in recorded history frequently pounded the region during the first millennium, from the peak of the Roman Empire into the height of the Middle Ages, according to a new study. The findings could have implications for the intensity and frequency of hurricanes that the US East and Gulf coasts could experience as ocean temperatures increase as a result of climate change.
National Science Foundation, Risk Prediction Initiative at the Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences, DOE/National Institute for Climate Change Research, NOAA, Dalio Explore

Contact: Peter Weiss
pweiss@agu.org
202-777-7507
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Depression Higos sheared apart
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Tropical Depression Higos and saw wind shear is literally pushing the storm apart.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 91-100 out of 314.

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