Special Feature
Coral Reef Photo

Around 2005, southern right whale calves off the coast of Argentina began dieing off at an unprecented rate (from 6 per year in 2005 to around 65 per year from 2005 to 2014). Scientists have never determined the cause until a recent Marine Mammal Science paper named a likely culprit: toxic algae blooms. Read about the new findings on EurekAlert!.

Video: Electric eels may be some of the most sophisticated marine predators in the animal kingdom, according to a recent Current Biology paper by Vanderbilt University researchers. Check out video of them in action here and read about their specialized hunting techniques on EurekAlert!.

The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.

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Showing releases 91-100 out of 508.

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Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees landfall for Tropical Cyclone Megh
Tropical Cyclone Megh became the second tropical cyclone to make landfall in Yemen in one week. As Megh began land falling just north of Aden, Yemen, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the tropical storm over the southeastern coast.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Study unlocks faster way to assess ocean ecosystem health
A new study published today identifies a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on. Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species -- so responders can act quickly to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Acta Biomaterialia
Sea urchin spurs new ideas for lightweight materials
Materials researchers love sea creatures. Mother-of-pearl provokes ideas for smooth surfaces, clams inspire gluey substances, shark's skin is used to develop materials that reduce drag in water, and so on. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Chemistry have now found a model for strong, lightweight materials by diving below the sea surface to investigate a sea urchin cousin known as the heart urchin.

Contact: Jes Andersen
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Nature Geoscience
Northern lakes act as CO2 chimneys in a warming world
Many of the world's approximately 117 million lakes act as wet chimneys releasing large amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, CO2, into the atmosphere. The most recent estimates show that CO2 emissions from the world's lakes, water courses and reservoirs are equivalent to almost a quarter of all the carbon dioxide produced by burning fossil fuels.

Contact: Gesa Weyhenmeyer
Uppsala University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Nature Communications
Geophysics could slow Antarctic ice retreat
The anticipated melting of the massive West Antarctic Ice Sheet could be slowed by two big factors that are largely overlooked in current computer models, according to a new study. The findings suggest that the impact on global sea levels from the retreating ice sheet could be less drastic -- or at least more gradual -- than recent computer simulations have indicated.
National Science Foundation, NOAA

Contact: Chris Chipello
McGill University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
2015 winners named in expanded AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards competition
Stories on the stressful impact of urban violence on children, the shared aptitudes of humans and songbirds for vocal learning, and the impact of climate change on the forests of Minnesota and beyond, are among the winners of the 2015 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards. For the first time in the 70-year history of the program, entries were accepted from journalists around the globe in all award categories.
The Kavli Foundation

Contact: Earl Lane
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Nature Communications
Growing Antarctic ice sheet caused ancient Mediterranean to dry up
An international research team led by a scientist at New Zealand's University of Otago has resolved the mystery of the processes involved in the Mediterranean Sea drying up around 5.6 million years ago. The event, known as the Messinian Salinity Crisis, saw the Mediterranean become a 1.5km deep basin for around 270,000 years. It also left a kilometers-deep layer of salt due to seawater evaporation.

Contact: Dr Christian Ohneiser
University of Otago

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Scientists measure the 'beauty' of coral reefs
Almost every person has an appreciation for natural environments. In addition, most people find healthy or pristine locations with high biodiversity more beautiful and aesthetically pleasing than environmentally degraded locations. In a study which computed 'aesthetics' as it relates to coral reefs, a multidisciplinary group of researchers have shown that an objective computational analysis of photographic images can be used to assess the health of a coral reef.

Contact: Andi Haas

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oil dispersants can suppress natural oil-degrading microorganisms, new study shows
The use of chemical dispersants meant to stimulate microbial crude oil degradation can in some cases inhibit microorganisms that naturally degrade hydrocarbons, according to a new study led by University of Georgia marine scientists. Their findings are based on laboratory-simulated conditions that mimic Gulf of Mexico deep waters immediately following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined microbial oil degradation in the Deepwater plume.
Ecosystem Impact of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
University of Georgia

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kate form, Bahamas under warning
NASA's Terra satellite saw the Atlantic Ocean's twelfth tropical depression as it was forming, and an animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite data showed its development into Tropical Storm Kate near the Bahamas.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 91-100 out of 508.

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