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Video: This video shows Odontodactylus scyllarus -- mantis shrimp -- eye movements. Mantis shrimp have one of the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. See the video, from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, here.
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April 10 - 17, 2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
New Orleans, Louisiana

Underwater
The Symposium encourages discussion, debate, and the sharing of knowledge, research techniques and lessons in conservation to address questions on the biology and conservation of sea turtles and their habitats.

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Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 96-105 out of 310.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Geosphere
Geosphere presents articles examining lithospheric evolution and geologic history
Geosphere articles posted online March 17, 2014, include additions to two series: 'CRevolution 2: Origin and Evolution of the Colorado River System II' and 'Origin and Evolution of the Sierra Nevada and Walker Lane.' Other articles present new seismic data for the Slate Range of California, USA; the first detailed geologic map from the Likhu Khola region of east central Nepal; and a review of pre-21st century ideas about the origin of Grand Canyon.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian affect Indonesia
The remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian moved out of the Southern Pacific Ocean and into the Indian Ocean only to trigger warnings and watches for part of Indonesia on Mar. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Satellite sees newborn South Pacific Tropical Storm Mike
NOAA's GOES-West satellite caught the birth of Tropical Storm Mike in the Southern Pacific Ocean on March 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Tracking endangered leatherback sea turtles by satellite, key habitats identified
Most satellite tagging studies of leatherbacks have focused on adult females on their tropical nesting beaches, so little is known worldwide about males and subadults, the researcher point out. But now, tagging and satellite tracking in locations where leatherbacks forage has allowed the scientists to get a much richer picture of the leatherback's behavior and dispersal patterns on the open ocean.
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, NOAA, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Geology
New from Geology: Fossils, earthquakes, gold, and sea-bed landslides
Geology papers published March 17, 2014, cover modeling of seabed turbidity currents; a large earthquake at Lake Vaettern, Switzerland, about 11,500 years ago; genesis of high-grade gold at the Porgera gold deposit, Papua New Guinea; discovery of the Ediacaran guide fossil Cloudina sp. and the depositional age of the Bambui Group; earthquakes along the fossil Moho in Alpine Corsica; and using LiDAR to better understand New Zealand's Alpine Fault.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
NASA releases first interactive mosaic of lunar north pole
Scientists, using cameras aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, have created the largest high resolution mosaic of our moon's north polar region. The six-and-a-half feet (two-meters)-per-pixel images cover an area equal to more than one-quarter of the United States.
NASA

Contact: Elizabeth Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
New airborne GPS technology for weather conditions takes flight
A new technique led by a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego stands to improve weather models and hurricane forecasting by detecting precise conditions in the atmosphere through a new GPS system aboard airplanes. The first demonstration of the technique, detailed in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, is pushing the project's leaders toward a goal of broadly implementing the technology in the near future on commercial aircraft.
National Science Foundation, NASA, and others

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
NASA sees some strength left in remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian and spotted some towering thunderstorms and areas of heavy rainfall, indicating there's still power in the former tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Humans drive evolution of conch size
Smithsonian scientists found that 7,000 years ago, the Caribbean fighting conch contained 66 percent more meat than its descendants do today. Because of persistent harvesting of the largest conchs, it became advantageous for the animal to mature at a smaller size, resulting in evolutionary change.
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama's National Secretariat for Science, Technology and Innovation

Contact: Sean Mattson
mattsons@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28290
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Oceanography
New statistical models could lead to better predictions of ocean patterns
The world's oceans cover more than 72 percent of the earth's surface, impact a major part of the carbon cycle, and contribute to variability in global climate and weather patterns. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri applied complex statistical models to increase the accuracy of ocean forecasting that influences the ways in which forecasters predict long-range events such as El Nińo and the lower levels of the ocean food chain.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Showing releases 96-105 out of 310.

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