Special Feature
Blub blub blub Organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, this Seafood Recommendation list provides a comprehensive guide for the sustainability-minded seafood lover. Check it out here before your next trip to the grocery store!

Video:From September 4 to October 7, 2014, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer explored the uncharted deep-sea ecosystems of the US Atlantic coast. Among their many findings was this close-up of an octopus moving across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. Video credit to NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
                                                                

November 18th to 21st, 2014
9th International INMARTECH Symposium
Corvallis, Oregon

Underwater

The 9th International Marine Technician, INMARTECH 2014, Symposium will be held at Oregon State University (OSU) in Corvallis, Oregon on November 18-21, 2014. INMARTECH symposia were initiated with the purpose of providing a forum for marine technicians to meet and exchange knowledge and experiences, thereby aiming to improve equipment performance, deployment, and operational techniques during scientific cruises on research vessels.

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The Marine Science Portal on EurekAlert! was created through grants from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and The Ambrose Monell Foundation.
 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 96-105 out of 282.

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Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Journal of Fish Biology
Scientists document longest-ever case of sperm storage in sharks
Steinhart Aquarium biologists at the California Academy of Sciences were taken aback when a shark egg case dropped by an adult bamboo shark, who spent nearly 4 years isolated from males, showed signs of healthy development. Their results, published in the Journal of Fish Biology, mark the longest documented case of sperm storage in any species of shark, and highlight a bright bit of news for the future of wild sharks threatened by overfishing and habitat loss.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Nature Plants
Algae use same molecular machinery as land plants to respond to a plant hormone
Land-based plants -- including the fruits and vegetables in your kitchen -- produce and respond to hormones in order to survive. Scientists once believed that hormone signaling machinery only existed in these relatively complex plants. But new research from the University of Maryland shows that some types of freshwater algae can also detect ethylene gas -- the same stress hormone found in land plants -- and might use these signals to adapt to changing environmental conditions.
National Science Foundation, Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, Belgian American Educational Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, American Society of Plant Biologists

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Ecosphere
Algae blooms create their own favorable conditions, new study finds
Fertilizers are known to promote the growth of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater and oceans worldwide, but a new multi-institution study shows the aquatic microbes themselves can drive nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in a combined one-two punch in lakes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Renewable Energy Journal
Wave energy integration costs should compare favorably to other energy sources
A new analysis suggests that large-scale wave energy systems developed in the Pacific Northwest should be comparatively steady, dependable and able to be integrated into the overall energy grid at lower costs than some other forms of alternative energy, including wind power.

Contact: Ted Brekken
brekken@eecs.oregonstate.edu
541-737-2995
Oregon State University

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Geology
Coral reefs threatened by a deadly combination of changing ocean conditions
The lowering of the ocean's pH is making it harder for corals to grow their skeletons and easier for bioeroding organisms to tear them down. Erosion rates increase tenfold in areas where corals are also exposed to high levels of nutrients, according to a study published January 2015 in the journal Geology. As sea level rises, these reefs may have a harder time growing toward the ocean surface, where they get sunlight they need to survive.
National Science Foundation, Nature Conservancy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Conservation Program.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Cool deep-water protects coral reefs against heat stress
Cool currents from the deep ocean could save tropical corals from lethal heat stress. Researchers from Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Phuket Marine Biological Center observed internal waves preserving corals in the Andaman Sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
New model identifies eastern stream sections holding wild brook trout
A new model that can accurately identify stream sections that still hold suitable habitat for wild brook trout will help fisheries managers from Maine to Georgia find and protect habitat for this fish, which is an economically, socially and ecologically important species.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Interface
Has car manufacturer taken the corner too fast with the boxfish design?
Billions of years of evolution have provided solutions for countless technical problems, while teaching designers and engineers a thing or two along the way. But now a car manufacturer has designed a concept model based on the supposed characteristics of the boxfish. Researchers at the University of Groningen have shown that their design is actually based on an incorrect interpretation of the characteristics of this fish.

Contact: E.J. Stamhuis
e.j.stamhuis@rug.nl
31-503-632-078
University of Groningen

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Marine Pollution Bulletin
Marine litter education boosts children's understanding and actions
A study by Plymouth University finds children could play an important role in solutions to reduce marine litter with some already helping to educate parents and peers about the scale of the issue.

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Drought led to massive 'dead zone' in Lake Erie
Lake Erie just can't catch a break. The lake has experienced harmful algal blooms and severe oxygen-depleted 'dead zones' for years, but now a team of researchers led by Carnegie's Anna Michalak and Yuntao Zhou has shown that the widespread drought in 2012 was associated with the largest dead zone since at least the mid-1980s.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Michalak
michalak@carnegiescience.edu
650-201-2667
Carnegie Institution

Showing releases 96-105 out of 282.

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