Press Releases

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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1593.

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Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Storm Ignacio north of Hawaiian Islands
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ignacio on Sept. 1 it gathered cloud and wind data on the weakening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Typhoon Kilo moving through northwestern Pacific Ocean
NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted the eye in a strong Typhoon Kilo moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
NASA sees shapeless Tropical Depression 14E
Tropical Depression 14E can't get its act together and still appears as a shapeless, asymmetric mass of clouds and thunderstorms on infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
NSF, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency support development of new Arctic maps
The National Science Foundation, in partnership with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, is supporting development of high-resolution topographic maps of the Arctic that for the first time will provide consistent coverage of the entire globally significant region, including Alaska.

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Journal of Biogeography
Saving coral reefs depends more on protecting fish than safeguarding locations
A new study by Wildlife Conservation Society has found that coral reef diversity 'hotspots' in the southwestern Indian Ocean rely more on the biomass of fish than where they are located, a conclusion that has major implications for management decisions to protect coral reef ecosystems.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Fred losing its punch
Tropical Storm Fred is losing its punch. Satellite imagery shows that there are no strong thunderstorms developing in the tropical storm indicating that the storm is weakening.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM sees Hurricane Jimena's intense eyewall
NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite passed over Hurricane Jimena and saw an intense eyewall with heaviest rainfall occurring in the northern and eastern sides of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Water tables, 3D rock formations, wind speed maps & hydrothermal vents
This week from AGU: High water tables, 3-D rock formations, wind speed maps & hydrothermal vents.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
A marine creature's magic trick explained
Crystal structures on the sea sapphire's back appear differently depending on the angle of reflection

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Nature
CT scan of Earth links deep mantle plumes with volcanic hotspots
Geophysicists have detected plumes of hot rock rising through the mantle from the core-mantle boundary, and hypothesized that they remain stationary for millions of years, generating volcanic island chains as the crust moves over them. UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab scientists now have proof of this connection, after using seismic waves from large earthquakes to map Earth's interior to obtain a CT scan of the mantle. The plumes are much fatter than expected.
National Science Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
PLOS ONE
Animal without synapses feeds by external digestion using global, local cellular control
A multicellular marine animal without organs, Trichoplax's feeding behavior may include cellular coordination, resulting in external food digestion.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
The Condor
Loons return faithfully to the same wintering sites year after year
Common Loons nest on lakes across Canada and the northern US, but every winter they disperse, many to the open ocean where they're difficult to track. It's been well established that many loons return to the same nesting sites every spring, but new research in The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows for the first time that they are similarly faithful to their wintering sites.

Contact: Rebecca Heisman
aoucospubs@gmail.com
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
New international standards needed to manage ocean noise
As governments and industries expand their use of high-decibel seismic surveys to explore the ocean bottom for resources, experts from eight universities or organizations say new global standards and mitigation strategies are needed to minimize the amount of sound the surveys produce and reduce risks posed to vulnerable marine life, especially in formerly unexploited areas such as the Arctic Ocean and US Atlantic coast now targeted for exploration.

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite shows fred facing a fizzling future
Fred was a hurricane on August 31 and weakened to a tropical storm on September 1 after moving through the Cape Verde Islands and the storm faces more obstacles in the coming days. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on September 1 showed a less organized storm than on the previous day.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
VIMS reports intense and widespread algal blooms
Water sampling and aerial photography by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science show that the algal blooms currently coloring lower Chesapeake Bay are among the most intense and widespread of recent years.

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
NASA sees wind shear affecting Hurricane Ignacio
Hurricane Ignacio is staying far enough away from the Hawaiian Islands to not bring heavy rainfall or gusty winds, but is still causing rough surf. Infrared satellite data on Sept. 1 shows that wind shear is adversely affecting the storm and weakening it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Depression 14E disorganized
Tropical Depression 14E was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean early on Sept. 1 when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and looked at it in infrared light.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM satellite shows double eye-wall in Hurricane Jimena
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite showed a double eye-wall in Hurricane Jimena on Sept. 1 as it moved through the Eastern Pacific and into the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Nature Communications
Climate change will irreversibly force key ocean bacteria into overdrive
The levels of ocean acidification predicted for the year 2100 have been shown to cause an irreversible evolutionary change to a bacteria foundational to the ocean's food web.
National Science Foundation and G.B. Moore Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-220-0017
University of Southern California

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Study will investigate storm impacts on fresh water
Stroud Water Research Center and the University of Delaware received a $475,000 grant from the US Department of Agriculture to study how the enormous amount of particulate organic nitrogen transported downstream during intense storms contributes to the overall nitrogen load, and what then happens to all the particulate materials.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Beverly M Payton
bpayton@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x305
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
NASA spots Kilo, now a typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific
Hurricane Kilo may have formed in the Central Pacific Ocean, but on Sept. 1 it crossed the International Date Line, so it was classified as a typhoon. NASA's Aqua satellite spotted a clear eye in the Category 3 typhoon early on Sept. 1.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Journal of Shellfish Research
Saving oysters by digging up their past
Restoring oyster reefs is not an easy task, but by digging deep and examining centuries-old reefs, marine restoration professionals may stand a better chance at bringing oysters back, said a new Cornell University and Paleontological Research Institution study published in the August issue of the Journal of Shellfish Research.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
PLOS ONE
Heat and acid could squeeze trout out of southern Appalachian streams
A newly published research study that combines effects of warming temperatures from climate change with stream acidity projects average losses of around 10 percent of stream habitat for coldwater aquatic species for seven national forests in the southern Appalachians -- and up to a 20 percent loss of habitat in the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests in western North Carolina.

Contact: Andrew Dolloff
adolloff@fs.fed.us
540-231-1383
USDA Forest Service ‑ Southern Research Station

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
14th Deep Sea Biology Symposium
Understanding the deep sea is key to a sustainable blue economy
Once considered remote and inaccessible, commercial interest to exploit the deep sea is rising due to economic drivers and technology developments. However, exploitation activities in the deep sea remain highly contentious, particularly regarding the potential risks and environmental impacts associated with such activities. Deep-sea stakeholders have identified deficiencies in basic knowledge of deep-sea systems which could hinder ecosystem-based management of the deep sea and in turn limit the sustainability of the emerging deep blue economy.

Contact: Dr. Kate Larkin
klarkin@esf.org
32-059-340-156
European Science Foundation

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Male seahorse and human pregnancies remarkably alike
Their pregnancies are carried by the males but, when it comes to breeding, seahorses have more in common with humans than previously thought, new research from the University of Sydney reveals.

Contact: Jocelyn Prasad
jocelyn.prasad@sydney.edu.au
61-434-605-018
University of Sydney

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1593.

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