Press Releases

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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1742.

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Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
PLOS ONE
The mystery of the Red Sea
An international team of biologists including researchers from the Moscow State University discovered new species of fluorescent polyps living in colonies on the shells of gastropods.

Contact: Vladimir Koryagin
science-release@rector.msu.ru
Lomonosov Moscow State University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
Man-made underwater sound may have wider ecosystem effects than previously thought
Underwater sound linked to human activity could alter the behaviour of seabed creatures that play a vital role in marine ecosystems, according to new research from the University of Southampton.
Environmental Technology Programme, BP International Ltd

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
An international research team found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators. As a consequence they are captured more easily and their survival chances are halved.

Contact: Mark McCormick
Mark.McCormick@jcu.edu.au
61-040-937-1015
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
Dr Stephen Simpson and his international research team found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators. As a consequence they are captured more easily and their survival chances are halved.
Natural Environment Research Council, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Duncan Sandes
d.sandes@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
Plastic debris crossing the Pacific can transport more species with the help of barnacles
The smooth surfaces of much of the plastic waste rapidly increasing in the ocean appear to provide poor habitat for animals -- that is, until barnacles step in.

Contact: Mike Gil
m.gil@ufl.edu
University of Florida

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Bachelor's paradise: FSU researcher finds female turtles outnumbering males
Rising global temperatures may skew gender imbalance among the marine turtle population, according to new Florida State University research.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
The odor of stones
A recent study by Chemists of the University Jena (Germany) published in the current issue of 'Nature Communications' demonstrates that diatoms are able to trace silicate minerals in the water. Moreover, they can even move actively to areas where the concentration of silicates is especially high (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10540).

Contact: Ute Schoenfelder
presse@uni-jena.de
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
The seawater temperature distribution in tropics affects the rainfall in East Asia
A wide swatch of Asia, from the tropics to the mid-latitudes, which has wet and dry seasons, is significantly affected by 'Asian monsoons.' The amount of rainfall in particular has a close relationship to agriculture and damage from flooding.
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Ministry of the Environment

Contact: Masataka Watanabe
kohositu@un.tsukuba.ac.jp
81-298-532-039
University of Tsukuba

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
Safeguarding sturgeon
Researchers at the University of Delaware are one step closer to developing an online map that would help Mid-Atlantic fishermen avoid catching Atlantic sturgeon. The UD team found they could make useful predictions about sturgeon locations using satellite measurements of ocean color and temperature. The findings are reported in the Feb. 3 issue of Methods in Ecology and Evolution.
NOAA, Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System, and Lenfest Ocean Program

Contact: Peter Bothum
pbothum@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
This week from AGU: Volcanic eruptions, ocean carbon, quake fossils and new landslide video
This week from AGU are items on volcanic eruptions, ocean carbon, quake fossils and a new landslide video.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
207-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Nature
In the Southern Ocean, a carbon-dioxide mystery comes clear
Twenty thousand years ago, low concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere allowed the earth to fall into the grip of an ice age. But despite decades of research, the reasons why levels of the greenhouse gas were so low then have been difficult to piece together. New research, published today in the leading journal Nature, shows that a big part of the answer lies at the bottom of the world.

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Nature
Ready for the high seas?
Carlos Duarte and colleagues at the KAUST Red Sea Research Center have sequenced and analyzed the genome of Zostera marina, a widespread genus of seagrass found in temperate waters of the northern hemisphere. Their results show that seagrass ancestors underwent several major evolutionary changes before they migrated from shallow ponds back into deep seas.

Contact: Michelle D'Antoni
michelle.dantoni@kaust.edu.sa
King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Nature Communications
Antarctic study identifies melting ice sheet's role in sea level rise
Loss of ice in Antarctica caused by a warming ocean could raise global sea levels by three metres, research suggests.
Natural Environment Research Council, British Antarctic Survey

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Greenland ice sheet releasing 'Mississippi River' worth of phosphorus
Not only is Greenland's melting ice sheet adding huge amounts of water to the oceans, it could also be unleashing 400,000 metric tons of phosphorus every year -- as much as the mighty Mississippi River releases into the Gulf of Mexico, according to a new study.

Contact: Simon Davies
simon.l.davies@bristol.ac.uk
01-179-288-086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
PLOS ONE
Warming ocean may bring major changes for US northeast fishery species
NOAA scientists have released the first multispecies assessment of just how vulnerable U.S. marine fish and invertebrate species are to the effects of climate change. The study examined 82 species that occur off the Northeastern U.S., where ocean warming is occurring rapidly. Researchers found that most species evaluated will be affected, and that some are likely to be more resilient to changing ocean conditions than others.
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-548-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
PLOS ONE
Penguin chicks huddle up for heat, protection
Location and environmental conditions may influence when gentoo chicks huddle in cold, wet Antarctic conditions, according to a study published Feb. 3, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Caitlin Black from the University of Oxford, and colleagues.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
The Auk: Ornithological Advances
DNA analysis of sandpiper feces reveals a broad diet
The researchers behind a forthcoming study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances have shown that semipalmated sandpipers on their annual stopover in Canada's Bay of Fundy eat a far broader diet than anyone suspected -- and they did it by analyzing poop.

Contact: Rebecca Heisman
aoucospubs@gmail.com
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Study shows North Atlantic Ocean CO2 storage doubled over last decade
A University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study shows that the North Atlantic absorbed 100 percent more man-made carbon dioxide over the last decade, compared to the previous decade. The findings show the impact that the burning of fossil fuels have had on the world's oceans in just 10 years.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
NSF awards rapid response grants to study current El Niño, one of the strongest on record
El Niño: What effect will it have on weather, on flooding and landslides, and on economically important coastal ecosystems?

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Journal of Phycology
Four new algae species discovered in Hawaii's deep waters
Scientists working with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries announced the discovery of four new species of deep-water algae in Hawaii's Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument. The new species were collected between 200-400 feet, depths not typically known for marine algae.
NOAA

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Pharmaceutical residues increasingly disrupt aquatic life: A hidden global change
Let's forget about the climate for a minute. Largely hidden from public view, another global change is causing increasing disruption. Residues of medicines in water can kill aquatic animals and play havoc with their food web and reproductive cycle. An international team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) makes an urgent case for better wastewater treatment and biodegradable pharmaceuticals.

Contact: Froukje Rienks
f.rienks@nioo.knaw.nl
31-317-473-590
Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Greenland ice sheet releasing 'Mississippi River' worth of phosphorus
Not only is Greenland's melting ice sheet adding huge amounts of water to the oceans, it could also be unleashing 400,000 metric tons of phosphorus every year -- as much as the mighty Mississippi River releases into the Gulf of Mexico, according to a new study.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
PeerJ
Ship noise extends to frequencies used by endangered killer whales
When an endangered orca is in hot pursuit of an endangered salmon, sending out clicks and listening for their echoes in the murky ocean near Seattle, does the noise from the nearby shipping lane interfere with them catching dinner? To find out scientists measured underwater noise as ships passed their study site 3,000 times. This unprecedented characterization of ship noise will aid in the understanding of the potential effects on marine life, and help with possible mitigation strategies.

Contact: Scott Veirs
scott@beamreach.org
206-251-5554
PeerJ

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
2016 AAAS Annual Meeting
2016 AAAS/Subaru SB&F prizes honor science books about animals
Octopus researchers, the science of de-extinction, and chickens are the subjects of the winners of 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)/Subaru Science Books & Film Prizes for Excellence in Science Books.
Subaru, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Andrea Korte
akorte@aaas.org
202-326-6551
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 1-Feb-2016
Nature Materials
Cling-on warriors
An interdisciplinary group of researchers at UC Santa Barbara has taken strides in the development of an underwater adhesive that has the potential for a variety of biomedical and non-biological applications.

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1742.

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