Press Releases

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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1536.

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Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Conservation Physiology
New study exposes negative effects of climate change on Antarctic fish
Scientists at University of California Davis and San Francisco State University have discovered that the combination of elevated levels of carbon dioxide and an increase in ocean water temperature has a significant impact on survival and development of the Antarctic dragonfish (Gymnodraco acuticeps). The research article was published today in the journal Conservation Physiology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Chloe Foster
chloe.foster@oup.com
44-186-535-3584
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Study of 'senior citizen' marine snails uncovered how nerve cells fail during learning
A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers' findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans.
National Institutes of Health, Maytag Foundation, Korein Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Rogue wave theory to save ships
Physicists have found an explanation for rogue waves in the ocean and hope their theory will lead to devices to warn ships and save lives.

Contact: Nail Akhmediev
Nail.Akhmediev@anu.edu.au
61-261-250-191
Australian National University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Acta Materialia
Boxfish shell inspires new materials for body armor and flexible electronics
The boxfish's unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Environment and Behavior
Aquariums deliver health and wellbeing benefits
In the first study of its kind, the team found that viewing aquarium displays led to noticeable reductions in blood pressure and heart rate, and that higher numbers of fish helped to hold people's attention for longer and improve their moods.

Contact: Alex Smalley
a.j.smalley@exeter.ac.uk
0044-187-225-8135
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Researchers provide new details about sea stars' immunity
A study led by a University of Texas at Arlington graduate student examining sea stars dying along the West Coast provides new clues about the starfish's immune response and its ability to protect a diverse coastal ecosystem.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
GSA Today
Past and present sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA
In a new article for GSA Today, authors Benjamin DeJong and colleagues write that sea-level rise (3.4 mm/yr) is faster in the Chesapeake Bay region than any other location on the Atlantic coast of North America, and twice the global average (1.7 mm/yr). They have found that dated interglacial deposits suggest that relative sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay region deviate from global trends over a range of timescales.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Endangered icebreakers: The future of Arctic research, exploration and rescue at risk
The United States' Icebreaker Fleet -- operated by the US Coast Guard -- consists of just two ships that are used for everything from search and rescue to national security operations to scientific research. Examine the various roles icebreakers play, especially in Arctic research, and how insufficient funding is affecting the icebreakers' roles.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@agiweb.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Marine Policy
Humpback whale recovery in Australia -- A cause for celebration
Australia has one of the highest rates of animal species that face extinction in the world. However, over the last decade, there have been animals that are rebounding. One example is the conservation success story of the recovery of the humpback whales that breed in Australian waters. This new study, published in Marine Policy, reviews data collected in past studies and proposes a revision of the conservation status for humpback whales found in Australian waters.

Contact: Alex Walker
a.walker@elsevier.com
44-186-584-3364
Elsevier

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
FAU to develop unmanned marine vehicles for bridge inspections
Florida has approximately 11,450 bridges and inspecting and maintaining them is arduous, especially since so many of them span rivers, canals and saltwater areas. Researchers at FAU have received a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation to develop unmanned marine vehicles for on-water bridge inspections. Unlike manned vessels, which are continuously teleoperated by a human user, unmanned surface vehicles are capable of operating autonomously without human intervention for prolonged periods of time.
Florida Department of Transportation

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Plant light sensors came from ancient algae
The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study from Duke University. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Ecology
Scientists study predator-prey behavior between sharks and turtles
A new collaborative study led by scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science & Abess Center for Ecosystem Science & Policy examined predator-prey interactions between tiger sharks and sea turtles off the Northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4061
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
New research using NASA satellite data and ocean biology models suggests tiny organisms in vast stretches of the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead. Brighter clouds reflect more sunlight back into space affecting the amount of solar energy that reaches Earth's surface, which in turn has implications for global climate. The results were published July 17 in the journal Science Advances.
NASA

Contact: Ellen Gray
Ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Ecology
Parasitic flatworms flout global biodiversity patterns
The odds of being attacked and castrated by a variety of parasitic flatworms increases for marine horn snails the farther they are found from the tropics. A Smithsonian-led research team discovered this exception to an otherwise globally observed pattern -- usually biodiversity is greatest in the tropics and decreases toward the poles.
Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Smithsonian Marine Science Network, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows to OM), NSF-NIH Ecology of Infectious Diseases grant

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 12W grow into a Tropical Storm
The storm intensified into a tropical storm as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead at 03:00 UTC (July 22 at 11 p.m. EDT).
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Depression Felicia 'swallow' Socorro Island
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and observed Tropical Depression Felicia almost directly over Socorro Island, as if the storm swallowed the island.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
NASA's GPM sees dry air affecting Typhoon Halola
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core observatory passed over Typhoon Halola and saw that the northern side of the storm lacked rainfall. Dry air moving into the storm from the north was sapping the development of thunderstorms on that side of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Journal of Mammalogy
SeaWorld's killer whales live as long as their wild counterparts
A new peer-reviewed study published in the Journal of Mammalogy by the Oxford University Press adds important insights to the debate over how long killer whales in human care live. The study found no difference in life expectancy between killer whales born at SeaWorld and a well-studied population of wild killer whales.

Contact: Fred Jacobs
fred.jacobs@seaworld.com
SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc.

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Missoula's Sunburst sensors wins XPRIZE for ocean device
Sunburst Sensors LLC, a company resulting from University of Montana research, won $1.5 million in XPRIZE funding on July 20 for producing the best device to affordably, accurately and efficiently measure ocean chemistry.
Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE

Contact: Mike DeGrandpre
michael.degrandpre@mso.umt.edu
406-243-4118
The University of Montana

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Satellite sees birth of Tropical Storm Felicia in Eastern Pacific Ocean
Tropical Storm Felicia was born early on July 23 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, over 400 miles southwest of Baja California's southern tip. NOAA's GOES-West satellite provided an infrared image of the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
NASA sees newborn Tropical Depression 12W near northeastern tip of Philippines
When Tropical Depression 12W formed on the northeastern tip of the Philippines in the Luzon Region, NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
NASA looks inside Typhoon Halola
Satellite technology has the ability to see things we could never imagine, like how hard the rain is falling in storms, and how high cloud tops stretch into the atmosphere.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Nature
Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths
Measurements of iron speciation in ancient rocks were used to construct the chemistry of ancient oceans. Analysis suggests that it took less oxygen than previously thought to trigger the appearance of complicated life forms.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Keep Tahoe blue? Less algae, not clarity, key for lake's blueness
The assumption that Lake Tahoe's blueness is tied to clarity has driven advocacy and management efforts in the Lake Tahoe Basin for decades. But the report's findings show that at times of the year when clarity increases, blueness decreases, and vice versa.
California Tahoe Conservancy, IVGID Waste Not Program, League to Save Lake Tahoe, Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation, Tahoe Area Sierra Club, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Lakefront Owners Association, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Tahoe Water Suppliers Association

Contact: Geoffrey Schladow
gschladow@ucdavis.edu
530-902-2272
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
The Condor
Reintroduced Channel Islands eagles thrive on a diet of seabirds and fish
Reintroducing a species into an area where it has vanished can be a great tool for conservation, but for reintroduction to be successful it's crucial to understand how the habitat has changed in the interim. A recent study examined the diet of reintroduced Bald Eagles in California's Channel Islands and compared it to the diet of the historical population, and the results show evidence of a healthy ecosystem bolstered by recent seabird conservation efforts.

Contact: Seth Newsome
newsome@unm.edu
Central Ornithology Publication Office

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1536.

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