Press Releases

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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1749.

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Public Release: 3-May-2016
Molecular Ecology
'Eve' and descendants shape global sperm whale population structure
Although sperm whales have not been driven to the brink of extinction as have some other whales, a new study has found a remarkable lack of diversity in the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA within the species.
Mamie Markham Award, Lylian Brucefield Reynolds Award, International Fulbright Science & Technology, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation

Contact: Scott Baker
scott.baker@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0255
Oregon State University

Public Release: 3-May-2016
The FEBS Journal
New insights on how oysters form shells
Researchers know that several proteins are involved in oyster shell formation, but how expression of these proteins is controlled is not well understood. Now investigators report that they have identified a protein called Pf-POU3F4 that promotes expression of two of these proteins, called Aspein and Prismalin-14.

Contact: Penny Smith
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70448
Wiley

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Mammal Review
Current whale migration models are too simplified
New research challenges the traditional view that baleen whales (Mysticetes) migrate between high-latitude feeding areas and low-latitude breeding areas.

Contact: Penny Smith
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70448
Wiley

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Journal of Interdisciplinary Science Topics
Is it possible to cry a river?
University of Leicester students examine plausibility of all the humans on Earth shedding enough tears to form a river -- and fill an Olympic size swimming pool.

Contact: Robbie Roe
rkr8@student.le.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 3-May-2016
171st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Megan S. Ballard awarded the R. Bruce Lindsay Award of the Acoustical Society of America
Megan S. Ballard of the Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, has been named recipient of the R. Bruce Lindsay Award of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) for contributions to underwater acoustic propagation modeling and inversion techniques in acoustical oceanography.

Contact: Elaine Moran
elaine@aip.org
516-576-2360
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 3-May-2016
171st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Whitlow Au awarded Gold Medal by Acoustical Society of America
Whitlow W. L. Au, Emeritus Research Professor at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kaneohe, HI, has been named recipient of the Gold Medal of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) for contributions to understanding underwater biosonar, and for service to the Acoustical Society.

Contact: Elaine Moran
elaine@aip.org
516-576-2360
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 3-May-2016
eLife
The herring genome provides new insight on how species adapt to their environment
How species genetically adapt to their environment is a central question related to the evolution of biodiversity. In a new study scientists at Uppsala University and their colleagues report that whole genome sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring revealed hundreds of loci underlying adaptation to the brackish Baltic Sea or timing of reproduction. The study is published today in eLife.

Contact: Professor Leif Andersson
Leif.Andersson@imbim.uu.se
46-705-144-904
Uppsala University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Science Advances
Reef system with 10,000 km2 found at the Amazon River mouth
Researchers from Brazil and the US mapped and characterized an extensive reef system in an unlikely area of the Brazilian coast. Oil and gas companies operate close to the reefs.
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil), Coordenadoria de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - CAPES (Brazil), Fundação Carlos Chagas Filho de Amparo à Pesqui

Contact: USP Scientific Outreach Unit
divulgacaocientifica@usp.br
55-113-091-3242
University of Sao Paulo Scientific Outreach Unit

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Bioscience
River food webs threatened by widespread hydropower practice
The decline of aquatic insects downstream from some hydroelectric dams has been linked to a widespread practice known as hydropeaking, whereby river flows are increased during the day when electricity demands are large, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey, along with researchers from Oregon State University, Utah State University and Idaho State University. Findings show it may be possible to mitigate these negative effects by using alternative hydropower practices.
US Geological Survey, Oregon State University, Utah State University, Idaho State University

Contact: Jennifer LaVista
jlavista@usgs.gov
720-480-7875
US Geological Survey

Public Release: 2-May-2016
BioScience
Hydropeaking of river water levels is disrupting insect survival, river ecosystems
A group of researchers concluded today in a study in the journal BioScience that 'hydropeaking' of water flows on many rivers in the West has a devastating impact on aquatic insect abundance.
Bureau of Reclamation's Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, US Geological Survey's Southwest Biological Science Center, Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration.

Contact: David Lytle
lytleda@oregonstate.edu
Oregon State University

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
New study found ocean acidification may be impacting coral reefs in the Florida keys
MIAMI -- In a new study, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers found that the limestone that forms the foundation of coral reefs along the Florida Reef Tract is dissolving during the fall and winter months on many reefs in the Florida Keys. The research showed that the upper Florida Keys were the most impacted by the annual loss of reef.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 2-May-2016
BioScience
Hydropeaking extirpates river insects
One of hydropower's purported benefits is its ability to use timed water releases to meet peak electrical demand. However, this practice can eliminate populations of insects that lay eggs near the river's edge, with potentially severe effects for ecosystems.

Contact: James M Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 2-May-2016
EARTH: Reading the ridges -- Are climate and the seafloor connected?
EARTH Magazine plunges into the depths of the ocean with scientists seeking whether Earth's climate and sea-level history are intrinsically linked with tectonics at mid-ocean ridges.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Climate Change
How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise?
Land water, including groundwater extraction, contributes far less to sea level rise than previously thought, according to a new study.

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-223-680-7316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Climate Change
Influence of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming is shaped by temperatures in the Pacific Ocean
The Arctic amplification phenomenon refers to the faster rate of warming in the Arctic compared to places farther south. Arctic amplification has been linked to a spike in the number of persistent cold spells experienced in recent years over Europe and North America.

Contact: Duncan Sandes
d.sandes@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 29-Apr-2016
Science Advances
Forming fogbows: Study finds limit on evaporation to ice sheets, but that may change
Although the coastal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet are experiencing rapid melting, a significant portion of the interior of that ice sheet has remained stable -- but a new study suggests that stability may not continue. Researchers found that very little of the snow and ice on the vast interior of the ice sheet is lost to the atmosphere through evaporation because of a strong thermal 'lid' that essentially traps the moisture and returns it to the surface where it refreezes.

Contact: David Noone
dcn@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-3629
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2016
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Evidence points to widespread loss of ocean oxygen by 2030s
Climate change has caused a drop in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans in some parts of the world, and those effects should become evident across large parts of the ocean between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study led by researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Entomological Society of America releases statement on the dangers of invasive species
The Entomological Society of America has issued a statement about the dangers of invasive species and the potential threats they pose to US national interests by undermining food security, trade agreements, forest health, ecosystem services, environmental quality, and public health and recreation.

Contact: Chris Stelzig
cstelzig@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Annals of Glaciology
Ice loss accelerating in Greenland's coastal glaciers, Dartmouth study finds
Surface meltwater draining through and underneath Greenland's tidewater glaciers is accelerating their loss of ice mass, according to a Dartmouth study that sheds light on the relationship between meltwater and subglacial discharge.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Canadian waters getting safer, but research gaps limit full understanding of shipping risks
The workshop report, 'Commercial Marine Shipping Accidents: Understanding the Risks in Canada,' identifies the risks of commercial marine shipping accidents across Canada's regions and for different cargo types, while highlighting gaps in understanding and areas for further research.

Contact: Samantha Rae Ayoub
samantha.rae@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x256
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
Hear no evil: Farmed fish found to be hard of hearing
New research published today in the journal Scientific Reports has revealed for the first time that half of the world's farmed fish have hearing loss due to a deformity of the earbone.

Contact: Nerissa Hannink
nhannink@unimelb.edu.au
61-430-588-055
University of Melbourne

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Journal of Comparative Neurology
Scientists establish first map of the sea lion brain
Despite considerable evidence for the California sea lion's intelligence, very little is known about how their brain is organized. Now, a team of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University has taken an important step toward uncovering this mystery by conducting the first comprehensive study of the California sea lion's central nervous system, concentrating on the somatosensory system, which is concerned with conscious perception of touch, pressure, pain, temperature, position and vibration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Protecting diversity on coral reefs: DNA may hold the key
Research published today by a team of scientists discovered that large areas of intact coral reef with extensive live coral cover, not disturbed by humans or climate change, harbor the greatest amount of genetic diversity. With this work, the researchers uncovered a link between species diversity of an ecosystem and the genetic diversity encoded within the DNA of those species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Deep-sea biodiversity impacted by climate change's triple threat
A new study found that vulnerability of deep-sea biodiversity to climate change's triple threat -- rising water temperatures, and decreased oxygen, and pH levels -- is not uniform across the world's oceans.

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
New book by ecologist James Estes recounts pioneering research in Alaska
In his new book, 'Serendipity,' marine ecologist James Estes recounts the simple twists of fate that sent him to the Aleutian Islands in 1970 to study the distribution and abundance of sea otters. It was the start of a remarkable journey of discovery that led to profound insights about the complexity of ecological interactions and the importance of predators in natural ecosystems.

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1749.

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