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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1401.

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Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Weather and Forecasting
Better method for forecasting hurricane season
A better method for predicting the number of hurricanes in an upcoming season has been developed by a team of University of Arizona atmospheric scientists. The UA team's new model improves the accuracy of seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico by 23 percent. The team's research paper was published online in the journal Weather and Forecasting on March 25.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Science Foundation Arizona

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Bacteria play an important role in the long term storage of carbon in the ocean
The ocean is a large reservoir of dissolved organic molecules, and many of these molecules are stable against microbial utilization for hundreds to thousands of years. They contain a similar amount of carbon as compared to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, the University of South Carolina and the Helmholtz Centre Munich found answers to questions about the origin of these persistent molecules in a study published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Dr. Oliver Lechtenfeld
oliver.lechtenfeld@ufz.de
49-341-235-1020
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
NASA sees Maysak become a super typhoon
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Typhoon Maysak as it strengthened into a super typhoon on March 31, reaching Category 5 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature
The 'intraterrestrials': New viruses discovered in ocean depths
The intraterrestrials, they might be called. Strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than the viruses that inhabit deep ocean methane seeps and prey on single-celled microorganisms called archaea.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Scientists discover elusive secret of how continents formed
An international research team, led by a Virginia Tech geoscientist, has revealed information about how continents were generated on Earth more than 2.5 billion years ago -- and how those processes have continued within the last 70 million years to profoundly affect the planet's life and climate.

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Discovery of 2 new species of primitive fishes
Working with an international team, paleontologists at the University of Zurich have discovered two new species of Saurichthys. The ~242 million year old predatory fishes were found in the fossil Lagerstätte Monte San Giorgio, in Ticino. They are distinct from previously known Saurichthys species in the shape of the head and body, suggesting different habitats and diet.

Contact: Dr. Heinz Furrer
heinz.furrer-paleo@bluewin.ch
41-793-282-666
University of Zurich

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Geology
UNH geologist identifies new source of methane for gas hydrates in Arctic
Researchers have identified a new source of methane for gas hydrates -- ice-like substances found in sediment that trap methane within the crystal structure of frozen water -- in the Arctic Ocean. The findings, published online now in the May 2015 journal Geology, point to a previously undiscovered, stable reservoir for methane that is 'locked' away from the atmosphere, where it could impact global climate change.
Research Council of Norway, US Department of Energy

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Massive study is first to explore historical ocean response to abrupt climate change
A new study reports that marine ecosystems can take thousands, rather than hundreds, of years to recover from climate-related upheavals. The study's authors -- including Peter Roopnarine, Ph.D., of the California Academy of Sciences -- analyzed thousands of invertebrate fossils to show that ecosystem recovery from climate change and seawater deoxygenation might take place on a millennial scale.
National Science Foundation, UC Multicampus Research Programs and Initiatives, UC Davis REACH IGERT, Mia Tegner Historical Ecology Grant, EPA STAR Fellowship, Switzer Environmental Fellowship

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
NASA's ISS-RapidScat sees Typhoon Maysak's stronger winds become more uniform
A tropical cyclone does not always have consistently strong winds all the way around it, and NASA's ISS-RapidScat instrument confirmed that was the case with Typhoon Maysak as it was strengthening in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Over the course of three days, As the tropical cyclone strengthened, RapidScat saw strongest sustained winds around Typhoon Maysak expand and spread from the northern quadrant to other quadrants of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Equatorial fish babies in hot water
Scientists have discovered that rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
GeoBiology
New research identifies diverse sources of methane in shallow Arctic lakes
New research into the changing ecology of thousands of shallow lakes on the North Slope of Alaska suggests that in scenarios of increasing global temperatures, methane-generating microbes, found in thawing lake sediments, may ramp up production of the potent greenhouse gas -- which has a global warming potential 25 times greater than carbon dioxide.
NASA/Astrobiology Institute, Astrobiology of Icy Worlds Program, NASA/Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets Award

Contact: Justin Broglio
justin.broglio@dri.edu
775-673-7610
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea change: What took decades to destroy in oceans took millennia to recover
While climate change and the deoxygenation of seawater can alter ocean ecology very quickly, recovery can be on a 1,000-year scale, not the 100-year scale previously thought.
National Science Foundation, EPA STAR Fellowship, Switzer Environmental Fellowship

Contact: Sarah Moffitt
semoffitt@ucdavis.edu
808-381-9177
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Water and Environment Journal
Glow in the dark tampons identify sewage pollution in rivers
Tampons may not be an obvious scientific tool, but engineers from the University of Sheffield in the UK have been using them to identify where waste water from baths, washing machines, sinks and showers is polluting our rivers and streams.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Abigail Chard
abigail@campuspr.co.uk
44-113-258-9880
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Spring plankton bloom hitches ride to sea's depths on ocean eddies
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event --a massive bloom of microscopic plants, or phytoplankton -- unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Fisheries Research
Pacific-wide study reveals striped marlins' preferred habitat, may help avoid overfishing
Using the largest tagging data set to date, lead author Chi Hin 'Tim' Lam of UMass Amherst's Large Pelagics Research Center in Gloucester, Mass., with colleagues at USC Los Angeles and the Marine Conservation Science Institute of Waikoloa, Hawaii, show that across the Pacific Ocean the vertical habitat of striped marlin is defined by the light-penetrated, uppermost part of the ocean known as the epipelagic layer, within eight degrees Celsius of sea surface temperature.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Biology Letters
Coorong fish hedge their bets for survival
Analysis of the ear bones of the River Murray estuarine fish black bream has revealed how these fish 'hedge their bets' for population survival.

Contact: Bronwyn Gillanders
bronwyn.gillanders@adelaide.edu.au
61-417-036-235
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones Coral trout in protected 'green zones' are not only bigger and more abundant than those in fished 'blue zones' of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, but they are also better able to cope with cyclone damage, according to a long-term study published today in Current Biology.

Contact: Niall Byrne
niall@scienceinpublic.com.au
61-417-131-977
Australian Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Swirling currents deliver phytoplankton carbon to ocean depths
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event -- a massive phytoplankton bloom -- unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic. But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning
A new study published by Science and led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change. Data from nearly two decades of satellite missions have shown that the ice volume decline is accelerating.
NASA

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
A decade in, have Australia's no-take reserves protected life on the Reef?
The expansion of no-take marine reserves within Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park more than a decade ago is working to protect fish just as experts had hoped it would, say researchers who have been monitoring the reef via underwater surveys. The findings, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 26, come as encouraging news for Australia's largest reef and for other, similar projects around the world.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Coastal property values could erode if nourishment subsidies end
The value of many oceanfront properties on the East Coast could drop dramatically if Congress were to suddenly end federal beach nourishment subsidies. Values could fall by as much as 17 percent in towns with high property values and almost 34 percent in towns with low property values. A gradual reduction of the subsidies, in contrast, is more likely to smooth the transition to more climate-resilient coastal communities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Marine Environmental Research
A mile deep, ocean fish facing health impacts from human pollution
Deep-water marine fish living on the continental slopes at depths from 2,000 feet to one mile have liver pathologies, tumors and other health problems that may be linked to human-caused pollution, one of the first studies of its type has found. The findings appear to reflect general ocean conditions.
European Union

Contact: Michael Kent
Michael.kent@oregonstate.edu
541-737-8652
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
Florida Tech study finds climate refuges where corals survive, grow
As rising ocean temperatures continue to fuel the disappearance of reef-building corals, a new study from Florida Tech finds there may be some climate refuges where corals will survive in the future.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Shell-shocked: Ocean acidification likely hampers tiny shell builders in Southern Ocean
University of Colorado Boulder study shows a ubiquitous type of phytoplankton -- tiny organisms that are the base of the marine food web -- appears to be suffering from the effects of ocean acidification caused by climate change.
National Science Foundation, NOAA

Contact: Natalie Freeman
natalie.freeman@colorado.edu
303-735-1337
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Q&A with Rex Buchanan, solar storm satellite, pollution from aquifers
This week from AGU: a Q&A with Rex Buchanan, solar storm satellite and pollution from aquifers.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
914-552-5759
American Geophysical Union

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1401.

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