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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1312.

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Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
NASA sees intensifying typhoon Phanfone heading toward Japan
An intensifying typhoon called Phanfone that originated east of Guam on Sept. 28, 2014 is headed toward southern Japan. The TRMM satellite crossed above Typhoon Phanfone on Oct. 1, 2014 at 1039 UTC and gathered data about rainfall rates occurring in the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Coral reef winners and losers
Scientists show that a subset of present coral fauna will likely populate oceans as water temperatures continue to rise.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
BioMarine Business Convention
Top Executives from around the World Discuss Marine Bio-Resources in Portugal
The fifth edition of BioMarine, the international investment platform dedicated to the marine bio-resources, will bring together 300 CEO, Top Executives and start-ups from around the world, on 30 and 31 Oct. at the Estoril Congress Centre, in Cascais, Portugal under the High Patronage of the Presidency of the Republic of Portugal and Prince Albert II of Monaco.

Contact: Maria Joao Soares
mjsoares@jlma.pt
351-914-237-487
JLM&A, SA

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Environmental Science: Nano
Nanoparticles accumulate quickly in wetland sediment
Using mesocosms that closely approximate wetland ecosystems, researchers show carbon nanotubes accumulate quickly in sediments -- a tendency that could indirectly damage aquatic food chains by piggybacking harmful molecules.
National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Changing Antarctic waters could trigger steep rise in sea levels
Current changes in the ocean around Antarctica are disturbingly close to conditions 14,000 years ago that new research shows may have led to the rapid melting of Antarctic ice and an abrupt 3-4 meter rise in global sea level.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean program, Oregon landslides
This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean Program, and Oregon landslides.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Rating the planet's oceans
Researchers from UCSB's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis helped produce the first Ocean Health Index that includes all the Earth's oceans.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
In stickleback fish, dads influence offspring behavior and gene expression
Researchers report that some stickleback fish fathers can have long-term effects on the behavior of their offspring: The most attentive fish dads cause their offspring to behave in a way that makes them less susceptible to predators. These behavioral changes are accompanied by changes in gene expression, the researchers report.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Tropical Storm Phanfone fragmented
The bands of thunderstorms wrapping around Tropical Storm Phanfone in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean appeared fragmented to NASA's TRMM satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E
Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the size difference between the two tropical low pressure areas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Pollution linked to lethal sea turtle tumors
Polluted urban and farm runoff in Hawaii has been linked to lethal tumors in endangered sea turtles. A new Duke University-led study finds that excess nitrogen in the runoff accumulates in algae that the turtles eat and can cause the disease Fibropapillomatosis which is the leading known cause of death in endangered green sea turtles. The disease causes the formation of tumors on the animals' eyes, flippers, and internal organs.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund and a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Shape up quickly -- applies to fish, too!
Fish can live in almost any aquatic environment on Earth, but when the climate changes and temperatures go up many species are pushed to the limit. The amount of time needed to adjust to new conditions could prove critical for how different species cope in the future, reveals a new study from researchers at the University of Gothenburg, published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Erik Sandblom
erik.sandblom@bioenv.gu.se
46-031-786-454-846
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts
Bacteria may have ability to reduce impact of diazepam on UK river environments
Scientists at Plymouth University and the University of Liverpool have identified a reaction pathway which could reduce the potentially harmful impact of diazepam and similar chemicals on the UK's freshwater environment.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Plymouth University leads global study examining wave energy transfer on rocky coastlines
Plymouth University is leading a £340,000 international study analyzing the ability of rocky foreshores to absorb the impact of waves on the world's coastlines.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Grouse moor burning causes widespread environmental changes
Evidence of the environmental effects of moorland burning is published today in the first authoritative scientific study on the subject, with the aim of relieving tensions on both sides of the grouse moor management debate.
Natural Environment Research Council, Yorkshire Water

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Biodiversity in the Mediterranean is threatened by alien species
Humans have introduced nearly a thousand species from other seas into the Mediterranean with very serious impact on its unique flora and fauna, finds new study to be published in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
press@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Smithsonian scientists discover coral's best defender against an army of sea stars
Coral reefs face a suite of perilous threats in today's ocean. From overfishing and pollution to coastal development and climate change, fragile coral ecosystems are disappearing at unprecedented rates. Despite this trend, some species of corals surrounding the island of Moorea in French Polynesia have a natural protector in their tropical environment: coral guard-crabs. New research has helped unravel the complex symbiotic relationship between these crabs and the coral reefs they live in and defend.
University of Florida, BIOCODE Mo'orea Project

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Physics of Fluids
Laser-guided sea monkeys show how zooplankton migrations may affect global ocean currents
Sea monkeys have captured the popular attention of both children and aquarium hobbyists because of their easily observable life cycle. Physicists are interested in a shorter-term pattern: Like other zooplankton, brine shrimp vertically migrate in large groups throughout the day in response to changing light conditions. New research suggests that the collective movement of small marine organisms could affect global ocean circulation patterns on a level comparable to the wind and the tides.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton
The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton -- microscopic aquatic plants important for fish populations and Earth's carbon cycle.
NASA

Contact: Patrick Lynch
patrick.lynch@nasa.gov
301-286-3854
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Rachel before losing hurricane status
Tropical Storm Rachel strengthened into a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 27-28, only to weaken back into a tropical storm by Sept. 29. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rachel before it weakened and took a visible picture of the storm off Baja California's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri winding down over open ocean
Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to appear more like a cold front on satellite imagery as it transitions into an extra-tropical storm over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone triggers warnings in Northwestern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone on Sept. 29 and captured a picture of the storm that showed thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the storm's center, and a large band of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the east. Phanfone is now a threat to various islands and warnings are in effect.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Half of global wildlife lost, says new WWF report
Between 1970 and 2010 populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe dropped 52 percent, says the 2014 Living Planet Report released today by World Wildlife Fund (WWF). This biodiversity loss occurs disproportionately in low-income countries -- and correlates with the increasing resource use of high-income countries.

Contact: Brendan Rohr
Brendan.rohr@wwfus.org
202-495-4621
World Wildlife Fund

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Ocean acidification could lead to collapse of coral reefs
Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Carnegie Institute of Science researchers have measured a roughly 40 percent reduction in the rate of calcium carbonate deposited in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in the last 35 years, likely caused by ocean acidification. If the trend continues, it could damage the reef framework and endanger the entire coral ecosystem, with the loss of its magnificent and highly diverse flora and fauna.
Israel Science Foundation, Moore Foundation

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Naturwissenschaften
Dolphins are attracted to magnets
Dolphins are indeed sensitive to magnetic stimuli, as they behave differently when swimming near magnetized objects. So says Dorothee Kremers and her colleagues at Ethos unit of the Université de Rennes in France, in a study in Springer's journal Naturwissenschaften -- The Science of Nature. Their research, conducted in the delphinarium of Planète Sauvage in France, provides experimental behavioral proof that these marine animals are magnetoreceptive.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1312.

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