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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1355.

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Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda stretching out
NASA's Terra satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Glenda was being stretched out by wind shear on Feb. 27.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
The Condor
Salish Sea seagull populations halved since 1980s
The number of seagulls in the Strait of Georgia is down by 50 per cent from the 1980s and University of British Columbia researchers say the decline reflects changes in the availability of food.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Scientific Reports
Newly discovered algal species helps corals survive in the hottest reefs on the planet
A new species of algae has been discovered in reef corals of the Persian Gulf where it helps corals to survive seawater temperatures of up to 36 degrees Celsius -- temperatures that would kill corals elsewhere.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Marine Technology Society Journal
'Ecosystem services' help assess ocean energy development
In a new paper, Brown University environmental scientists suggest that the way to fill vast gaps in knowledge about the ecological and socioeconomic impacts of ocean energy development is to consider how the benefits provided by ocean ecosystems change before and after the placement of ocean energy infrastructure. The authors examine the case of Muskeget Channel in Massachusetts as an example.

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
NASA sees the Tropical Cyclone Glenda away from land
NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on the Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Glenda that showed powerful thunderstorms circling the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
How mantis shrimp evolved many shapes with same powerful punch
The miniweight boxing title of the animal world belongs to the mantis shrimp, a cigar-sized crustacean whose front claws can deliver an explosive 60-mile-per-hour blow akin to a bullet leaving the barrel of a gun. A study of 80 million years of mantis shrimp evolution reveals how these fast weapons evolved their dizzying array of shapes -- from spiny and barbed spears to hatchets and hammers -- while still managing to pack their characteristic punch.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
IPCC sea-level rise scenarios not fit for purpose for high-risk coastal areas
The sea-level rise scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change do not necessarily provide the right information for high-risk coastal decision-making and management, according to new research involving scientists from the University of Southampton.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Ecology Letters
'Blue-green algae' proliferating in lakes
The organisms commonly known as blue-green algae have proliferated much more rapidly than other algae in lakes across North America and Europe over the past two centuries -- and in many cases the rate of increase has sharply accelerated since the mid-20th century, according to an international team of researchers led by scientists at McGill University.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Fonds de Recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies, Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Chris Chipello
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
A mollusk of a different stripe
Optical features embedded in marine shells may help develop responsive, transparent displays.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science
Embrace unknowns, opt for flexibility in environmental policies
Two University of Washington researchers argue in a Science perspectives piece that conservation managers must learn to make decisions about managing ecosystems and natural resources based on an uncertain future.
National Science Foundation, University of Washington

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
mBio
Sewage provides insight into human microbiome
A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Causes of Great Lakes smelt population decline are complex
The reasons for the dwindling population of smelt prey fish in the Great Lakes to near historic lows are more complicated than previously believed, new research from Purdue University and collaborators suggests.
U.S. Geological Survey

Contact: Keith Robinson
robins89@purdue.edu
765-494-2722
Purdue University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda may be developing an eye
Tropical Cyclone Glenda is strengthening in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite saw a potential eye developing when it passed overhead on Feb. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Oikos
Climate-warmed leaves change lake ecosystems, Dartmouth-led study finds
Rising soil temperatures significantly affect autumn leaves and consequently the food web, appearance and biochemical makeup of the lakes and ponds those leaves fall into, a Dartmouth College-led study finds.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Environmental Pollution
Agricultural insecticides pose a global risk to surface water bodies
Streams within approximately 40 percent of the global land surface are at risk from the application of insecticides. These were the results from the first global map to be modeled on insecticide runoff to surface waters, which has just been published in the journal Environmental Pollution by researchers from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research and the University of Koblenz-Landau together with the University of Milan, Aarhus University and Aachen University.
European Commission, German Ministry for Education and Research

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
BioScience
Isolated wetlands have significant impact on water quality
Geographically isolated wetlands play an outsized role in providing clean water and other environmental benefits even though they may lack the regulatory protections of other wetlands, according to an article by Indiana University researchers and colleagues.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
NASA Terra satellite spots new Tropical Cyclone 14S
A tropical low pressure area designated as System 90S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 21, 2015 and has been slowly organizing and consolidating. Three days later System 90S became Tropical Storm 14S as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
Climate-change clues from the turtles of tropical Wyoming
Tropical turtle fossils discovered in Wyoming by University of Florida scientists reveal that when the earth got warmer, prehistoric turtles headed north. But if today's turtles try the same technique to cope with warming habitats, they might run into trouble.

Contact: Jonathan Bloch
jbloch@flmnh.ufl.edu
352-514-1270
University of Florida

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Pew names 5 new marine conservation fellows for 2015
Five distinguished scientists and conservationists from Canada, Australia, Russia, and the United Kingdom are the 2015 recipients of the Pew fellowship in marine conservation. The fellowships will support research to improve ocean conservation and management.
The Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Rachel Brittin
rbrittin@pewtrusts.org
202-286-4149
Pew Charitable Trusts

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
New Florida Tech study links coral disease to a warming Atlantic
Over the last four decades, the iconic elkhorn and staghorn corals that dominated Caribbean reefs for millions of years have all but disappeared. According to a new study from Florida Institute of Technology, ocean warming has played a significant role in this dramatic decline.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
NASA adds up Tropical Cyclone Marcia's Queensland area rainfall
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Marcia dropped a lot of rain as it made landfall and moved over eastern Queensland, Australia from Feb. 19 to 21. Data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite was combined with other satellites to create a map of that rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Sea level spiked for 2 years along northeastern North America
Sea levels from New York to Newfoundland jumped up about four inches in 2009 and 2010 because ocean circulation changed. The unusual spike in sea level caused flooding along the northeast coast of North America and was independent of any hurricanes or winter storms. The forthcoming paper is the first to document that the extreme increase in sea level rise lasted two years, not just a few months, the researchers said.
NOAA Climate Program Office

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
PLOS Biology
World's protected natural areas receive 8 billion visits a year
Researchers say that the first study to attempt to gauge global visitation figures for protected areas reveals nature-based tourism has an economic value of hundreds of billions of dollars annually, and call for much greater investment in the conservation of protected areas in line with the values they sustain -- both economically and ecologically.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Marine Biology
Great Barrier Reef corals eat plastic
Researchers in Australia have found that corals commonly found on the Great Barrier Reef will eat micro-plastic pollution. Microplastics are tiny fragments of plastic in the environment and are a widespread contaminant in marine ecosystems, particularly in inshore coral reefs.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parasitism runs deep in malaria's family tree
The ancestors of a large family of parasites -- including those that cause malaria -- were equipped to become parasites much earlier in their lineage than previously assumed, according to University of British Columbia research.
Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Tula Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
602-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1355.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


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