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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1329.

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Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Earth's Future
NOAA establishes 'tipping points' for sea level rise related flooding
By 2050, a majority of US coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study, published today in the American Geophysical Union's online peer-reviewed journal Earth's Future.
NOAA

Contact: Keeley Belva
Keeley.Belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
550-million-year-old fossils provide new clues about fossil formation
A new study from University of Missouri and Virginia Tech researchers is challenging accepted ideas about how ancient soft-bodied organisms become part of the fossil record. Findings suggest that bacteria involved in the decay of those organisms play an active role in how fossils are formed -- often in a matter of just a few tens to hundreds of years. Understanding the relationship between decay and fossilization will inform future study and help researchers interpret fossils in a new way.
NASA Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program, NASA Astrobiology Institute, National Science Foundation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Policy action urgently needed to protect Hawaii's dolphins
Tourism is increasing pressure on Hawaii's spinner dolphins. A new Duke-led study shows that long-proposed federal regulations to limit daytime access to bays where the dolphins rest are greatly needed, but local, community-based conservation measures tailored to each individual bay will speed their acceptance. A one-size-fits-all approach will not work.
NOAA, Marine Mammal Commission, State of Hawaii, Dolphin Quest

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Colorado River Delta greener after engineered pulse of water
The engineered spring flood that brought water to previously dry reaches of the lower Colorado River and its delta resulted in greener vegetation, the germination of new vegetation along the river and a temporary rise in the water table, according to new results from the binational team of scientists studying the water's effects. The team's latest findings will be presented at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting the afternoon of Dec. 18.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
National model of restoration: Nine Mile Run
A study by a Pitt hydrologist shows that one of the largest urban-stream restorations in the United States has led to the recovery of fish and, more importantly, a groundswell of local support.

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Australia's coastal observation network may aid in understanding of extreme ocean events
A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Grant funds national expansion of watershed modeling website for science curriculum
Stroud Water Research Center, in collaboration with the Concord Consortium and Millersville University of Pennsylvania, received a $2.9 million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation to dramatically expand Model My Watershed, part of the WikiWatershed suite of online tools. This application allows users to explore how land use affects stream ecology and hydrology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beverly Payton
bpayton@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x305
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Scientific Reports
Syracuse biologist reveals how whales may 'sing' for their supper
Humpback whales have a trick or two, when it comes to finding a quick snack at the bottom of the ocean. Even in the dark. Susan Parks, assistant professor of Biology in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with a consortium of other researchers, has been studying these unique feeding behaviors. Her research emphasizes the importance of specific auditory cues that these mammoth creatures emit, as they search the deep ocean for their prey.

Contact: Amy Manley
amman100@syr.edu
315-443-9463
Syracuse University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite watching Cyclone Bakung's remnants
The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Bakung continue to linger in the Southern Indian Ocean, and NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite is one satellite keeping an eye on the storm for possible re-development.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Journal of Glaciology
Glacier beds can get slipperier at higher sliding speeds
Using the Iowa State University Sliding Simulator, Iowa State glaciologists Lucas Zoet and Neal Iverson have found that as a glacier's sliding speed increases, the bed beneath the glacier can grow slipperier. That laboratory finding could help researchers make better predictions of glacier response to climate change and the corresponding sea-level rise. The research results were just published in the Journal of Glaciology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lucas K. Zoet
lzoet@iastate.edu
515-294-4477
Iowa State University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Neglected disease research in Lao PDR -- capacity building in Burundi
This year, the R. Geigy Foundation in Basel, Switzerland, confers two awards: one to the Laotian scientist Somphou Sayasone, the other to the Swiss TPH Jubilee Project 'Connecting the Dots.' The value of the prizes awarded is 10,000 CHF and 70,000 CHF, respectively. With its awards the RGS recognizes excellent achievements in neglected disease research in South-East Asia and capacity building in Burundi.

Contact: Christian Heuss
christian.heuss@unibas.ch
41-612-848-683
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Breakthrough capability keeps subs, ships on safe track
Interactive software that can dramatically cut the time it takes to plan safe submarine missions is crossing over to the surface fleet and is being installed this month on the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53).

Contact: Peter Vietti
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Nature Climate Change
Ocean acidification a culprit in commercial shellfish hatcheries' failures
The mortality of larval Pacific oysters in Northwest hatcheries has been linked to ocean acidification. Yet the rate of increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the decrease of pH in near-shore waters have been questioned as being severe enough to cause the die-offs.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Nova Southeastern University researcher discovers new species of sea lily
Charles Messing, Ph.D., has discovered a new species of sea lily. Rather than naming it himself, he is auctioning off the naming rights on eBay to help raise funds for additional research.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Royal Society Open Science
Study reveals abundance of microplastics in the world's deep seas
Around four billion minute fibers could be littering each square kilometer of some of the world's deep seas, according to a study led by Plymouth University and Natural History Museum.

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Bakung's remnants
Tropical Cyclone Bakung ran into adverse conditions in the Southern Indian Ocean that weakened it to a remnant low pressure system when NASA's Aqua satellite spotted it on Dec. 15.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
genesis
To know the enemy
Recent collaborations between scientists in Okinawa and Australia are helping to spur genomic research of the Crown of Thorns starfish, a threat to coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific region.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Smithsonian launches major new initiative to better understand life on Earth
Scientists across the Smithsonian have studied genomics for years, investigating how animal and plant species function, relate to one another, adapt to change and thrive or fail to survive. Genomics also play a key role in their research of climate change, disease and biodiversity conservation. The Smithsonian is now uniting these efforts and creating a plan for transformative future research with the establishment of the Smithsonian Institute for Biodiversity Genomics.

Contact: John Gibbons
gibbonsjp@si.edu
202-633-5187
Smithsonian

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
NASA's watches Tropical Cyclone Bakung over open ocean
Tropical Cyclone Bakung is moving in a westerly direction over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the sea storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
NASA Sees Tropical Depression Hagupit Winding Down
Tropical Cyclone Bakung is moving in a westerly direction over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the sea storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
ZooKeys
A new trout species described from the Alakır Stream in Antalya, Turkey
A new fish species, Salmo kottelati, has been described from the Alakır Stream draining to Mediterranean Sea in Anatolia. The new species is currently only known from this specific locality. It belongs to the Salmonidae family, which includes salmons, trouts, chars, graylings and whitefishes. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Davut Turan
dvtturan@yahoo.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Science
Slow rate of croc mutation revealed in major Science study
In research led by Texas Tech Uni a team of researchers from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Veterinary Science has sequenced three crocodilians species and revealed that their rate of evolution is approximately four times slower than birds.'
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation grant, US National Science Foundation

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Environmental monitoring web community to be launched at American Geophysical Union Meeting
An online community for do-it-yourself environmental monitoring enthusiasts will eventually help environmental scientists and planners around the globe better observe and quantify the effects of land use and climate change. That's the vision for EnviroDIY.org, developed by Stroud Water Research Center in affiliation with the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory.

Contact: Beverly Payton
bpayton@stroudcenter.org
610-268-2153 x305
Stroud Water Research Center

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
NASA sees Hagupit weaken to a depression enroute to Vietnam
The once mighty super typhoon has weakened to a depression in the South China Sea as it heads for a final landfall in southern Vietnam. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that showed it was weakening.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Fish use chemical camouflage from diet to hide from predators
A species of small fish uses a homemade coral-scented cologne to hide from predators, a new study has shown, providing the first evidence of chemical camouflage from diet in fish.
Australian Research Council, Ecological Society of Australia

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1329.

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