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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1340.

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Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Twenty-first Eastern Pacific tropical depression born on Oct. 30
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the birth of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's twenty-first tropical depression, located far south of Acapulco, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Global Change Biology
Dartmouth study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions
Restoring wetlands can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to research in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
NASA sees Cyclone Nilofar looking more like a comet than a tropical cyclone
Tropical Cyclone Nilofar was closing in on the border between Pakistan and northwestern India on Oct. 30 when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead from space. Wind shear continued to affect the storm making it appear more like a comet with a tail, than a tropical cyclone.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
New study finds oceans arrived early to Earth
Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: where did Earth's water come from and when?
Harriett Jenkins NASA Graduate Fellowship, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Award for Innovative Research, NASA Cosmochemistry Award

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
European salamanders and newts vulnerable to fungal disease from Asia
A skin-eating fungal disease brought to Europe by humans now poses a major threat to native salamanders and newts, scientists have warned.
Ghent University, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs

Contact: An Martel
An.Martel@UGent.be
32-496-831-161
Ghent University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders
A fungal disease from Asia wiped out salamanders in parts of Europe and will likely reach the US through the international wildlife trade in Asian newts sold as pets, say US experts. In an Oct. 31 Science paper, an international team reports the fungus arose in Asia 30 million years ago and is lethal to many European and American newt species. It has not yet been found in North American wild amphibians.
Ghent University Special Research Fund, University of Maryland-Smithsonian Institution Seed Grant, Illinois Department of Natural Resources State Wildlife Grant, National Science Foundation.

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals
For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, UW Foundation

Contact: Warren Porter
wpporter@wisc.edu
608-262-1719
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nilofar being affected by wind shear
Wind shear has kicked in and has been pushing clouds and showers away from Tropical Cyclone Nilofar's center. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image that showed the effects of the shear on Oct. 29.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
New study shows 3 abrupt pulse of CO2 during last deglaciation
A new study shows that the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributed to the end of the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago did not occur gradually, but was characterized by three 'pulses' in which C02 rose abruptly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ed Brook
brooke@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8197
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New frog discovered inhabiting I-95 corridor from Connecticut to North Carolina
More than a half century after claims that a new frog species existed in New York and New Jersey were dismissed, a Rutgers researcher and team of scientists have proven that the frog is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina and are naming it after the ecologist who first noticed it.

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
732-932-0557
Rutgers University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Urban seismic network detects human sounds
When listening to the Earth, what clues can seismic data reveal about the impact of urban life? Although naturally occurring vibrations have proven useful to seismologists, until now the vibrations caused by humans haven't been explored in any real depth. Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers Nima Riahi and Peter Gerstoft will describe their efforts to tap into an urban seismic network to monitor the traffic of trains, planes, automobiles and other modes of human transport.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Geology
Glacier song
Mountain glaciers represent one of the largest repositories of fresh water in alpine regions. However, little is known about the processes by which water moves through these systems. In this study published in Geology on 24 Oct. 2014, David S. Heeszel and colleagues use seismic recordings collected near Lake Gornersee in the Swiss Alps to look for signs of water moving through fractures near the glacier bed.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
NASA gets a stare from Cyclone Nilofar's 14 mile-wide eye
Tropical Cyclone Nilofar developed an eye on Oct. 28 that seemed to stare at NASA's Terra satellite as it passed overhead in space. Warnings are already in effect from the India Meteorological Department as Nilofar is forecast to make landfall in northwestern India.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Remnants of tropical depression soaking Central America
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Hanna on Oct. 27 when it made landfall near the northern Nicaragua and southern Honduras border.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Ana's remnants raining and gusting in British Columbia, Canada
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of post-tropical cyclone Ana's remnant clouds raining on British Columbia, Canada today, Oct. 28. Wind warnings along some coastal sections of British Columbia continued today as the storm moved through the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Fish 'personality' linked to vulnerability to angling
Individual differences in moving activity in a novel environment are linked to individual differences in vulnerability to angling, according to an experimental study completed at the University of Eastern Finland and the Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute. The study used novel, long-term observations of individual behavior in groups and authentic angling trials to analyze if behaviors predict the vulnerability to fishing in brown trout reared in traditional and enriched hatchery rearing environments.

Contact: Laura Härkönen
laura.harkonen@oulu.fi
358-503-436-918
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Where did the Deepwater Horizon oil go? To Davy Jones' Locker at the bottom of the sea
Scientist David Valentine of the University of California, Santa Barbara and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of California, Irvine, have discovered the path the oil followed to its resting place on the Gulf of Mexico sea floor.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Where did all the oil go?
Due to its unprecedented scope, the damage assessment caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico has been a challenge.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite eyeing Tropical Cyclone Nilofar in Arabian Sea
Tropical Cyclone 04A continues to intensify and had been renamed Tropical Cyclone Nilofar when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Oct. 27.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Satellite movie shows Tropical Storm Ana headed to British Columbia, Canada
An animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite taken over the period of Oct.19 to 26 shows the movement, intensification, weakening and movement toward British Columbia, Canada. On Oct. 27, wind warnings were posted along some coastal sections of British Columbia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
NASA sees a 'Zombie' tropical storm kick off Halloween week
NASA's Terra satellite spotted a 'zombie' tropical storm as Halloween week kicks off. Tropical Depression 9 made landfall in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula late last week and lingered as a remnant low pressure area on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 25 and 26.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
The Plant Cell
Right place, right time: Cellular transportation compartments
Proteins are the machinery that accomplishes almost every task in every cell in every living organism. The instructions for how to build each protein are written into a cell's DNA. But once the proteins are constructed, they must be shipped off to the proper place to perform their jobs. New work describes a potentially new pathway for targeting newly manufactured proteins to the correct location.

Contact: Arthur Grossman
agrossman@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Climate change caused by ocean, not just atmosphere, new Rutgers study finds
Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere. Read about a Rutgers study published in Science that reveals another equally important factor in regulating the earth's climate.

Contact: Ken Branson
kbranson@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0580
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Policy
Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. In a new paper, Duke researchers argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.
Mary Derrickson McCurdy Visiting Scholar Program, Duke University Marine Laboratory

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1340.

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