Press Releases

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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1500.

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Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Toxicological Sciences
Flatworms could replace mammals for some toxicology tests
Laboratories that test chemicals for neurological toxicity could reduce their use of laboratory mice and rats by replacing these animal models with tiny aquatic flatworms known as freshwater planarians.
National Institutes of Health, Hellman Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Young Researchers Award winner to help advance biodiversity informatics in South Africa
Fatima Parker-Allie, a South African Ph.D. student, is a recipient of the GBIF Young Researchers' Award for 2015. Parker-Allie seeks to advance the biodiversity informatics in South Africa in three complementary areas: The development of a national BSc (honors) curriculum for biodiversity informatics; data quality improvements that make biodiversity data more fit for use in research applications; and distribution models of commercially important fish species in southern African waters under different climate scenarios.

Contact: Sampreethi Aipanjiguly
saipanjiguly@gbif.org
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Freshwater and ocean acidification stunts growth of developing pink salmon
Pink salmon that begin life in freshwater with high concentrations of carbon dioxide, which causes acidification, are smaller and may be less likely to survive, according to a new study from UBC.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Climate Change
Retreating sea ice linked to changes in ocean circulation, could affect European climate
Retreating sea ice in the Iceland and Greenland Seas may be changing the circulation of warm and cold water in the Atlantic Ocean, and could ultimately impact the climate in Europe, says a new study by an atmospheric physicist from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) and his colleagues in Great Britain, Norway and the United States.

Contact: Nicolle Wahl
nicolle.wahl@utoronto.ca
905-569-4656
University of Toronto

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
CCNY researchers develop eco-friendly oil spill solution
City College of New York researchers led by chemist George John have developed an eco-friendly biodegradable green 'herding' agent that can be used to clean up light crude oil spills on water.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science Advances
Why are seabirds abandoning their ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California?
A group of researchers from Mexico and the United States has found that warming oceanographic conditions and fishing pressure are driving nesting seabirds away from their ancestral breeding ground in Mexico into California harbors.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A 'hydrothermal siphon' drives water circulation through the seafloor
Vast quantities of ocean water circulate through the seafloor, flowing through the volcanic rock of the upper oceanic crust. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, published June 26 in Nature Communications, explains what drives this global process and how the flow is sustained.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Endangered Species Research
A tale of two whales
A new study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego indicates a steady population trend for blue whales and an upward population trend for fin whales in Southern California.
Office of Naval Research, Chief of Naval Operations N45, US Pacific Fleet

Contact: Brittany Hook or Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Heredity
Starfish that clone themselves live longer
Starfish that reproduce through cloning avoid ageing to a greater extent than those that propagate through sexual reproduction. This is shown by a new research study in which researchers from the University of Gothenburg participated. The study has recently been published in the highly respected journal Heredity.

Contact: Carina Eliasson
carina.eliasson@gu.se
46-317-869-873
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Heat-tolerant genes may rescue corals from increasing temperatures
The reef-building coral, Acropora millepora, can pass its tolerance for heat on to the next generation via its DNA, according to a new study.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Corals are already adapting to global warming, scientists say
Some coral populations already have genetic variants necessary to tolerate warm ocean waters, and humans can help to spread these genes, a team of scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and Oregon State University have found.
National Science Foundation, Australian Institute of Marine Science

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Depression Kujira at landfall
Tropical Depression Kujira made landfall in northeastern Vietnam early on June 24 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Nature Conservation
To the rescue: Helping threatened Mediterranean sea turtles
With all sea turtles being currently on the list of endangered species, authors Ullmann and Stachowitsch offer a critical review of what is being done towards saving injured Mediterranean loggerhead and green turtles. In their report, published in Nature Conservation, they also call for further development and implementation of rescue centres, first-aid stations and awareness campaigns.

Contact: Judith Ullmann
jul007@post.uit.no
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Biology Letters
Forgotten fossil indicates earlier origin of teeth
A tiny tooth plate of the 410 million year old fossil fish Romundina stellina indicates that teeth evolved earlier in the tree of life than recently thought.
EU Framework Programme 7, Natural Environment Research Council, Paul Scherrer Institut

Contact: Astrid Kromhout
astrid.kromhout@naturalis.nl
31-637-040-842
Naturalis Biodiversity Center

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Exceptional view of deep Arctic Ocean methane seeps
Close to 30.000 high definition images of the deep Arctic Ocean floor were captured on a recent research cruise. They give an exclusive insight into the most remote sites of natural methane release in the world.
Research Council of Norway

Contact: Maja Sojtaric
maja.sojtaric@uit.no
479-184-5151
CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Rainbow of glowing corals discovered in depths of the Red Sea
Glowing corals that display a surprising array of colors have been discovered in the deep water reefs of the Red Sea by scientists from the University of Southampton, UK, Tel Aviv University and the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, Israel, together with an international team of researchers.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
First species of yeti crab found in Antarctica named after British deep-sea biologist
The first species of yeti crab from hydrothermal vent systems of the East Scotia Ridge in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, has been described by a team of British scientists.
National Environment Research Council, Total Foundation

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
First species of yeti crab found in Antarctica
The first species of yeti crab from hydrothermal vent systems of the East Scotia Ridge in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, is described.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kujira move into the Gulf of Tonkin
Tropical Storm Kujira tracked over Hainan Island, China, and moved into the Gulf of Tonkin when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Scientists expect slightly below average Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' this summer
Scientists are expecting that this year's Chesapeake Bay hypoxic low-oxygen zone, also called the 'dead zone,' will be approximately 1.37 cubic miles -- about the volume of 2.3 million Olympic-size swimming pools. While still large, this is 10 percent lower than the long-term average as measured since 1950.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, University of Michigan, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
How will cold-loving Antarctic fish respond to warming ocean waters?
Climate change will be a real shock to Antarctic fishes' physiological systems, says Northeastern professor William Detrich. With a new NSF grant, he will study how rising ocean temperatures will affect the development of the embryos of these fish and the growth of juveniles after hatching.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jessica Caragher
j.caragher@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Scientific Reports
Survival of the gutless? Filter-feeders eject internal organs in response to stress
A recent Tel Aviv University study explores the ability of a common coral reef organism to eviscerate and regenerate its gut within 12 days and rebuild its filtration organ, the branchial sac, within 19 days. Understanding this process points to promising new directions in human soft tissue regeneration research.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Below-average 'dead zone' predicted for Chesapeake Bay in 2015
A University of Michigan researcher and his colleagues are forecasting a slightly below-average but still significant 'dead zone' this summer in the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary.

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Old-school literature search helps ecologist identify puzzling parasite
A months-long literature search that involved tracking down century-old scientific papers and translating others from Czech and French helped University of Michigan ecologist Meghan Duffy answer a question she'd wondered about for years.
National Science Foundation, U-M's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1500.

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