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Press Releases

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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1325.

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Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Endangered species success: Idaho salmon regaining fitness advantage
Once on the brink of extinction with only a few fish remaining, Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness they need to rebuild wild populations. A new analysis shows that naturally spawned offspring of fish saved by a hatchery program are now surviving to return at increasing rate -- high enough to not only sustain the population but also to rebuild it.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Ecological Indicators
Mining can damage fish habitats far downstream, study shows
Anglers across the nation wondering why luck at their favorite fishing spot seems to have dried up may have a surprising culprit: a mine miles away, even in a different state. Scientists at Michigan State University have taken a first broad look at the impacts of mines across the country and found that mining can damage fish habitats miles downstream, and even in streams not directly connected to the mines.
US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Better forecasts for sea ice under climate change
New research will help pinpoint the impact of waves on sea ice, which is vulnerable to climate change, particularly in the Arctic where it is rapidly retreating.

Contact: Luke Bennetts
luke.bennetts@adelaide.edu.au
61-466-457-406
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Animal Biotelemetry
Endangered hammerhead shark found migrating into unprotected waters
The precise movements of a young hammerhead shark have been tracked for the first time and are published in the open access journal Animal Biotelemetry. The study, which ran over a 10-month period, reveals important gaps in current efforts to protect these endangered sharks and suggests key locations that should be protected to help the survival of the species.

Contact: Joel Winston
Joel.Winston@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists could save thousands of pounds with student's DIY microscope
Expensive tests for measuring everything from sperm motility to cancer diagnosis have just been made hundreds of thousands of pounds cheaper by a Ph.D. student from Brunel University London who hacked his own microscope.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS Biology
International collaboration completes genome sequence of centipede
An international collaboration of scientists including Baylor College of Medicine has completed the first genome sequence of a myriapod, Strigamia maritima -- a member of a group venomous centipedes that care for their eggs -- and uncovered new clues about their biological evolution and unique absence of vision and circadian rhythm.

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Three UC San Diego professors named AAAS Fellows
The American Association for the Advancement of Science, the largest general science organization in the United States, has awarded the distinction of Fellow to three UC San Diego professors.

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
CT scans of coral skeletons reveal ocean acidity increases reef erosion
For coral reefs to persist, rates of reef construction must exceed reef breakdown. Prior research has largely focused on the negative impacts of ocean acidification on reef growth, but new research this week from scientists at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, based at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa, demonstrates that lower ocean pH also enhances reef breakdown: a double-whammy for coral reefs in a changing climate.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, Sigma-Xi, and University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Biology trumps chemistry in open ocean
Scientists laid out a new framework based on in situ observations that will allow them to describe and understand how phytoplankton assimilate limited concentrations of phosphorus, a key nutrient, in the ocean in ways that better reflect what is actually occurring in the marine environment. This is important because nutrient uptake is a property of ocean biogeochemistry, and in many regions controls carbon dioxide fixation, which ultimately can play a role in mitigating climate change.

Contact: Darlene Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Unmanned underwater vehicle provides first 3-D images of underside of Antarctic sea ice
A National Science Foundation-funded research team has successfully tested an autonomous underwater vehicle, AUV, that can produce high-resolution, three-dimensional maps of Antarctic sea ice. SeaBED, as the vehicle is known, measured and mapped the underside of sea-ice floes in three areas off the Antarctic Peninsula that were previously inaccessible.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Scientist gets more support to study Deepwater Horizon spill impact on coast
An associate professor in earth and planetary sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and her team have made new discoveries about bacterial diversity and oil degradation processes never before seen in marshes -- and thanks to a new grant, their work can continue.

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Animal Ecology
Lionfish analysis reveals most vulnerable prey as invasion continues
Findings of a study on lionfish predation behavior, which may also apply to some other fish and animal species, have shed some new light on which types of fish are most likely to face attack by this invasive predator, which has disrupted ecosystems in much of the Caribbean Sea and parts of the Atlantic Ocean.
Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, David H. Smith Conservation Research Program

Contact: Stephanie Green
Stephanie.green@science.oregonstate.edu
778-808-0758
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Computer to simulate harbor porpoises
Researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, use a computer model to predict the impact of new offshore wind farms on the population of harbor porpoises in the North Sea. A consortium of international energy companies has commissioned the project and funds the independent research.

Contact: Jacob Nabe-Nielsen
jnn@bios.au.dk
45-87-15-86-96
Aarhus University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Fisheries
Endangered Idaho salmon regaining fitness advantage
Endangered Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness of their wild ancestors, with naturally spawned juvenile sockeye returning from the ocean at a much higher rate than others from hatcheries, a new analysis has found. Biologists believe the increased return rate is high enough for the species to eventually sustain itself in the wild again.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Underwater robot sheds new light on Antarctic sea ice
The first detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice have been developed using an underwater robot. Scientists from the UK, USA and Australia say the new technology provides accurate ice thickness measurements from areas that were previously too difficult to access.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
New tool displays West Coast ocean acidification data
The NOAA data portal displays real-time ocean acidification data for the open ocean and protected bays. New tools monitor the level of aragonite near shellfish hatcheries in Alaska, Washington, Oregon and California.
NOAA Integrated Ocean Observing System

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
GPM measured Tropical Storm Adjali's rainfall before dissipation
Moderate rainfall was occurring around the center of Tropical Storm Adjali before it dissipated, according to data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
China's new 'Great Wall' not so great
China's second great wall, a vast seawall covering more than half of the country's mainland coastline, is a foundation for financial gain -- and also a dyke holding a swelling rush of ecological woes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Adjali making the curve
Tropical Storm Adjali started curving to the southwest on its trek through the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Nov. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Study: Environmental bleaching impairs long-term coral reproduction
Professor Don Levitan, chair of the Department of Biological Science, writes in the latest issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series that bleaching -- a process where high water temperatures or UV light stresses the coral to the point where it loses its symbiotic algal partner that provides the coral with color -- is also affecting the long-term fertility of the coral.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
'Aquatic osteoporosis' jellifying lakes
North American lakes are suffering from declining calcium levels, says new research from Queen's University.

Contact: Rosie Hales
rosie.hales@queensu.ca
613-533-6000 x77513
Queen's University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
As CO2 acidifies oceans, scientists develop a way to measure effect on marine ecosystems
Man-made emissions have dramatically increased the CO2 content of oceans and acidified their surface waters. Now scientists in Israel have for the first time developed a way to quantify how acidification is affecting marine ecosystems on an oceanic basin scale. Studying a 5,000 km strip of ocean, they developed a new way to assess overall calcification rates of coral reefs and open sea plankton based on variations in surface water chemistry.
Israel Science Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Israeli Ministry of Science and Technology

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Fountain of youth underlies Antarctic Mountains
In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, scientists explain why the ice-covered Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica looks as young as they do.
National Science Foundation, UK NERC; German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Resources

Contact: Kim Martineau
kimlynnmartineau@gmail.com
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Virulent bacteria affecting oysters found to be a case of mistaken identity
The bacteria that helped cause the near-ruin of two large oyster hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest have been mistakenly identified for years, researchers say in a recent report. In addition, the study shows that the bacteria now believed to have participated in that problem are even more widespread and deadly than the previous suspect.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Claudia Hase
claudia.hase@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7001
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Adjali develop a tail
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, the MODIS instrument aboard captured a picture of Tropical Cyclone Adjali that showed it developed a 'tail,' which is actually band of thunderstorms extending south of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1325.

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