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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1399.

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Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Spring plankton bloom hitches ride to sea's depths on ocean eddies
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event --a massive bloom of microscopic plants, or phytoplankton -- unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Fisheries Research
Pacific-wide study reveals striped marlins' preferred habitat, may help avoid overfishing
Using the largest tagging data set to date, lead author Chi Hin 'Tim' Lam of UMass Amherst's Large Pelagics Research Center in Gloucester, Mass., with colleagues at USC Los Angeles and the Marine Conservation Science Institute of Waikoloa, Hawaii, show that across the Pacific Ocean the vertical habitat of striped marlin is defined by the light-penetrated, uppermost part of the ocean known as the epipelagic layer, within eight degrees Celsius of sea surface temperature.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Biology Letters
Coorong fish hedge their bets for survival
Analysis of the ear bones of the River Murray estuarine fish black bream has revealed how these fish 'hedge their bets' for population survival.

Contact: Bronwyn Gillanders
bronwyn.gillanders@adelaide.edu.au
61-417-036-235
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones
Twice the coral trout in Great Barrier Reef protected zones Coral trout in protected 'green zones' are not only bigger and more abundant than those in fished 'blue zones' of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, but they are also better able to cope with cyclone damage, according to a long-term study published today in Current Biology.

Contact: Niall Byrne
niall@scienceinpublic.com.au
61-417-131-977
Australian Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Swirling currents deliver phytoplankton carbon to ocean depths
Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar 'greening' event -- a massive phytoplankton bloom -- unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic. But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning
A new study published by Science and led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change. Data from nearly two decades of satellite missions have shown that the ice volume decline is accelerating.
NASA

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Current Biology
A decade in, have Australia's no-take reserves protected life on the Reef?
The expansion of no-take marine reserves within Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park more than a decade ago is working to protect fish just as experts had hoped it would, say researchers who have been monitoring the reef via underwater surveys. The findings, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 26, come as encouraging news for Australia's largest reef and for other, similar projects around the world.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
PLOS ONE
Coastal property values could erode if nourishment subsidies end
The value of many oceanfront properties on the East Coast could drop dramatically if Congress were to suddenly end federal beach nourishment subsidies. Values could fall by as much as 17 percent in towns with high property values and almost 34 percent in towns with low property values. A gradual reduction of the subsidies, in contrast, is more likely to smooth the transition to more climate-resilient coastal communities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Marine Environmental Research
A mile deep, ocean fish facing health impacts from human pollution
Deep-water marine fish living on the continental slopes at depths from 2,000 feet to one mile have liver pathologies, tumors and other health problems that may be linked to human-caused pollution, one of the first studies of its type has found. The findings appear to reflect general ocean conditions.
European Union

Contact: Michael Kent
Michael.kent@oregonstate.edu
541-737-8652
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Global Change Biology
Florida Tech study finds climate refuges where corals survive, grow
As rising ocean temperatures continue to fuel the disappearance of reef-building corals, a new study from Florida Tech finds there may be some climate refuges where corals will survive in the future.

Contact: Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964
Florida Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Shell-shocked: Ocean acidification likely hampers tiny shell builders in Southern Ocean
University of Colorado Boulder study shows a ubiquitous type of phytoplankton -- tiny organisms that are the base of the marine food web -- appears to be suffering from the effects of ocean acidification caused by climate change.
National Science Foundation, NOAA

Contact: Natalie Freeman
natalie.freeman@colorado.edu
303-735-1337
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Q&A with Rex Buchanan, solar storm satellite, pollution from aquifers
This week from AGU: a Q&A with Rex Buchanan, solar storm satellite and pollution from aquifers.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
914-552-5759
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
NASA-NOAA satellite sees semnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Nathan
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Nathan over the southern Top End of Australia's Northern Territory on March 25.NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Nathan over the southern Top End of Australia's Northern Territory on March 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Ecological Applications
Rethinking wetland restoration: Smaller wetlands more valuable than previously thought
Most efforts to protect and restore wetlands mistakenly focus on preserving only total wetland area, with no consideration of ecosystem services provided by different wetland types, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Ecological Applications last month, shows wetland loss follows a strong pattern, with smaller, isolated wetlands being lost in much greater numbers than larger wetlands.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
PLOS Genetics
Genetic discovery may offer new avenue of attack against schistosomiasis
Researchers have discovered a group of genes in one species of snail that provide a natural resistance to the flatworm parasite that causes schistosomiasis, and opens the door to possible new drugs or ways to break the transmission cycle of this debilitating disease. It's been called a neglected global pandemic.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Blouin
blouinm@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-2362
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
NASA sees Nathan weakening near Darwin, Australia
Tropical Cyclone Nathan has been weakening as it continued to move over land in Australia's Northern Territory on March 24. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of the storm over land. Just one day before the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite saw some heavy rainfall in Nathan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Disturbingly little known about microbeads and plastics in the Great Lakes
National Democratic Party Member of Parliament Megan Leslie is calling on the Canadian government to list microbeads, tiny plastic flakes used in cosmetics, as a potential toxic substance. Health Canada claims the beads are safe for use as an additive, but Leslie says they pose a danger to the aquatic environment. Researchers at the University of Waterloo are warning that microbeads and plastic debris of all sizes could be a bigger environmental problem for the Great Lakes than previously thought.
Canada Excellence Research Chair Program

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Top Indian and US scientists share Tyler Prize for work in changing environmental policy
The Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement Executive Committee today named the Honorable Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., of Oregon State University, and Madhav Gadgil, Ph.D., of Goa University, as the recipients of the 2015 Tyler Prize for their leadership and engagement in the development of conservation and sustainability policies in the United States, India and internationally.

Contact: Nick Seaver
nseaver@burness.com
301-280-5727
Burness Communications

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Natural Hazards
New research predicts a doubling of coastal erosion by mid-century in Hawai'i
Chronic erosion dominates the sandy beaches of Hawai'i, causing beach loss as it damages homes, infrastructure, and critical habitat. Researchers have long understood that global sea level rise will affect the rate of coastal erosion. However, new research from scientists at the University of Hawaii - Manoa and the Hawai'i Department of Land and Natural Resources indicates that coastal erosion of Hawai'i's beaches may double by mid-century.
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, US Geological Survey Pacific Islands Climate Science Center

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Surviving in hostile territory
Many strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than archaea, primitive single-celled bacteria-like microorganisms.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nathan over Australia's Top End
Tropical Cyclone Nathan moved from Queensland, Australia west across the Gulf Carpentaria and is now crossing The Top End. NASA's Aqua and Terra satellite provided a day-to-day look at Nathan's western journey.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ascension of marine diatoms linked to vast increase in continental weathering
A team of researchers, including Rensselaer professor Morgan Schaller, has used mathematical modeling to show that continental erosion over the last 40 million years has contributed to the success of diatoms, a group of tiny marine algae that plays a key role in the global carbon cycle.

Contact: Mary Martialay
martim12@rpi.edu
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
NASA catches the 2-day life of Tropical Cyclone Reuben
Tropical Cyclone Reuben formed on Sunday, March 21, at 22:35 UTC in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and by March 23 was already dissipating. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Reuben when it was in the prime of its life on March 22.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Skin microbiome may hold answers to protect threatened gold frogs from lethal fungus
Researchers discovered new information about the relationship between symbiotic microbial communities and amphibian disease resistance.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Nature Climate Change
Atlantic Ocean overturning found to slow down already today
The Atlantic overturning is one of Earth's most important heat transport systems, pumping warm water northwards and cold water southwards. Also known as the Gulf Stream system, it is responsible for the mild climate in northwestern Europe. Scientists now found evidence for a slowdown of the overturning -- multiple lines of observation suggest that in recent decades, the current system has been weaker than ever before in the last century, or even in the last millennium.

Contact: PIK Press Office
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1399.

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