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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1338.

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Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Limnology & Oceanography
Scientists investigate link between skyrocketing sea slug populations and warming seas
A team of California scientists believes a far-flung Okenia rosacea bloom -- along with a slew of other marine species spotted north of their typical ranges -- may signal a much larger shift in ocean climate and a strong forthcoming El Niño.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Invasive species in the Great Lakes by 2063
The Great Lakes are the freshwater system that has been the most invaded by non-native species. Researchers predict they will remain vulnerable to future waves of invasions, unless some US-Canadian coordinated measures are implemented. The scientists also identify some species at high risk of being in the Lakes by 2063, if nothing is done.
Great Lakes Futures Project, Transborder Research University Network, Environment Canada, Michigan Sea Grant, New York Sea Grant, Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Melody Enguix
melody.enguix@mcgill.ca
514-398-6751
McGill University

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Diamondra sitting in the middle of the Indian Ocean not threatening land
Tropical Cyclone Diamondra is currently in the middle of the Indian Ocean and is not threatening any land masses at this time.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Tropical Cyclone Eunice still churning in the Southern Indian Ocean
The MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone Eunice in the South Indian Ocean, well south of Diego Garcia and the Cocos Islands. Its location is 637 nautical miles south-southwest of these islands. The storm is currently tracking south-southeastward at 10 knots.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
Global warming won't mean more stormy weather
A study led by atmospheric physicists at the University of Toronto finds that global warming will not lead to an overall increasingly stormy atmosphere, a topic debated by scientists for decades. Instead, strong storms will become stronger while weak storms become weaker, and the cumulative result of the number of storms will remain unchanged.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Current Biology
Study on dopamine neurons could instruct research into mobility and neurological disorders
University of Leicester team find for the first time when and why dopamine releasing cells in the forebrain are activated.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Dr. Jonathan McDearmid
jrm33@le.ac.uk
01-162-523-913
University of Leicester

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Bio-inspired autonomous vehicles expand Navy littoral capabilities
NRL researchers have taken inspiration from nature to design and develop novel underwater propulsion and control solutions for near-shore and littoral zone missions using autonomous underwater vehicles.

Contact: Daniel Parry
daniel.parry@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Current Biology
New research shows our seas are in trouble
New research by the University of Sheffield has warned of the increasing risk of extinction to our marine life.
Royal Society

Contact: Clare Parkin
clare.parkin@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-229-851
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
Tracking fish easier, quicker, safer with new injectable device
A new acoustic fish-tracking tag is so tiny it can be injected with a syringe. It's small size enables researchers to more precisely and safely record how fish swim through dams and use that information to make dams more fish-friendly.
US Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
PLOS ONE
Baleen whales hear through their bones
Understanding how baleen whales hear has posed a great mystery to marine mammal researchers. New research by San Diego State University biologist Ted W. Cranford and University of California, San Diego engineer Petr Krysl reveals that the skulls of at least some baleen whales, specifically fin whales in their study, have acoustic properties that capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it to their ear bones.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Energy & Fuels
Researchers produce two bio-fuels from a single algae
A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study published in the journal Energy & Fuels.
National Science Foundation, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Climate Change
Erratic as normal: Arctic sea ice loss expected to be bumpy in the short term
Arctic sea ice extent plunged precipitously from 2001 to 2007, then barely budged between 2007 and 2013. Even in a warming world, researchers should expect such unusual periods of no change -- and rapid change -- at the world's northern reaches, according to a new paper.

Contact: Jennifer Kay
jennifer.e.kay@colorado.edu
303-492-6289
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Journal of Wildlife Diseases
In Illinois, muskrats and minks harbor toxoplasmosis, a cat disease
A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
NASA panorama of 2 Southern Indian Ocean tropical cyclones
The MODIS instrument that flies aboard two NASA satellites captured images of Tropical Cyclone Diamondra and Tropical Cyclone Eunice in the South Indian Ocean, and two separate images were combined to make one panorama of the two storms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
The electric eye of Cyclone Bansi
Though this image may look like they come from a science fiction movie, it is in fact a photograph of tropical cyclone Bansi as seen at night by astronauts on the International Space Station. The image was taken when the ISS was east of Madagascar.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nannofossils from El Hierro place the Canaries closer to Hawaii
Pieces of sediment from the Cretaceous period encased in lava floated to the surface with the underwater eruption of El Hierro in 2011, bringing scientists valuable data on the islands' ocean floor. The analysis of the materials matches the origin of the Canary Islands archipelago to the model of how Hawaii was formed and confirms that the oldest islands are found to the east and the youngest to the west.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Climate Change
Nordic marine scientists push for way forward
In a commentary released in Nature Climate Change, a group of 13 scientists argue that the Nordic countries are in a unique position to showcase how to handle the growing pressure on the oceans. However, this relies on a collective ability to regard change as connected.

Contact: Dr. Oyvind Paasche
oyvind.paasche@uib.no
47-930-48919
The University of Bergen

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
PLOS ONE
Smothered oceans
From the subarctic Pacific to the Chilean margins, extreme oxygen loss is stretching from the upper ocean to about 3,000 meters deep. In some oceanic regions, such loss occurred within 100 years or less, according to a UC Davis study.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Moffitt
semoffitt@ucdavis.edu
808-381-9177
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
ZooKeys
Into the dark: Two new encrusting anemones found in coral reef caves
Three marine biologists from Japan have discovered two new and unusually unique species of encrusting anemone. Unlike almost all known species within their genus, these two new species do not have light-harvesting symbiotic zooxanthellae, having lost them as they adapted to life in cracks and caves in shallow coral reefs. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Dr. James D. Reimer
jreimer@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp
81-988-958-542
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Global Change Biology
Ocean acidification changes balance of biofouling communities
A new study of marine organisms that make up the 'biofouling community' -- tiny creatures that attach themselves to ships' hulls and rocks in the ocean around the world -- shows how they adapt to changing ocean acidification. Reporting in the journal Global Change Biology, the authors examine how these communities may respond to future change.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Satellite study identifies water bodies important for biodiversity conservation
Using satellite images to study changing patterns of surface water is a powerful tool for identifying conservationally important 'stepping stone' water bodies that could help aquatic species survive in a drying climate, a UNSW Australia-led study shows. The approach has been applied to the Swan Coastal Plain near Perth in Western Australia, which has more than 1,500 water bodies and is one of 25 designated biodiversity hotspots on the globe.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-293-857-307
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Blind beetles show extraordinary signs of sight
University of Adelaide researchers have made a surprising discovery in the aquifers beneath the Western Australian desert, which challenges the traditional Darwinian view of evolution.

Contact: Dr. Simon Tierney
simon.tierney@adelaide.edu.au
61-040-737-0741
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
From Tar Sands to Ring of Fire -- forewarning changes to Canada's watersheds
Ecologists have found the conservation of aquatic ecosystems in Canada has not kept pace with the country's changing landscape, and a prioritization of protection is needed. This new assessment of environmental, human census and business pattern data shows climate warming and northward expansion of human activities over a decade, and can be used to guide strategies for managing freshwater resources by highlighting the regions where humans are now having the greatest impact.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
NASA spots heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Diamondra
The eighth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season has formed far from land, and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite saw some heavy rain east of the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Global Inland Fisheries Conference
Fish catch break on world stage at global conference
Freshwater fish provide the food, sport and economic power across the globe. Inland fishing is often about individuals, families and small cooperatives. More than 60 million people in low-income nations are estimated to rely on inland fisheries for their livelihood. Its small-but-many base has in modern times across the globe been shy of strong data to document its impact. That has left the inland fishery industry a poor competitor for water against agriculture, energy, commercial development and industry.

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-2026
Michigan State University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1338.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


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