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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1262.

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Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
NASA sees last vestiges of Tropical Depression Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack had weakened to a tropical depression when NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite passed above on April 22, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Too many chefs: Smaller groups exhibit more accurate decision-making
The trope that the likelihood of an accurate group decision increases with the abundance of brains involved might not hold up when a group faces a variety of factors, Princeton University researchers report. Instead, smaller groups actually tend to make more accurate decisions while larger assemblies may become excessively focused on only certain pieces of information.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
Scientists identify source of mysterious sound in the Southern Ocean
Scientists have conclusive evidence that the source of a unique rhythmic sound, recorded for decades in the Southern Ocean and called the 'bio-duck,' is the Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis). First described and named by submarine personnel in the 1960s who thought it sounded like a duck, the bio-duck sound has been recorded at various locations in the Southern Ocean, but its source has remained a mystery, until now.
NOAA Fisheries, NSF/Office of Polar Programs, US Navy Environmental Readiness Division

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
AGU: Odds of storm waters overflowing Manhattan seawall up 20-fold, new study shows
Maximum water levels in New York harbor during major storms have risen by nearly two and a half feet since the mid-1800s, making the chances of water overtopping the Manhattan seawall now at least 20 times greater than they were 170 years ago, according to a new study.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Connecticut River watershed study will assess impacts of extreme rain events
A team of Yale researchers will lead a five-year, $3 million study to determine whether an increase in extreme rain events is affecting the transport of dissolved organic matter through the Connecticut River watershed, a phenomenon they say could alter the chemical composition and water quality of the watershed and Long Island Sound. The grant is funded by the National Science Foundation's MacroSystems Biology program.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Dennehy
kevin.dennehy@yale.edu
203-436-4842
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New research focuses on streamwater chemistry, landscape variation
Winsor Lowe, interim director of the University of Montana's Wildlife Biology Program, co-wrote a research paper on how streamwater chemistry varies across a headwater stream network.

Contact: Winsor Lowe
winsor.lowe@umontana.edu
406-243-4375
The University of Montana

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
NASA gets 2 last looks at Tropical Cyclone Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack lost its credentials today, April 22, as it no longer qualified as a tropical cyclone. However, before it weakened, NASA's TRMM satellite took a 'second look' at the storm yesterday.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Acta Biomaterialia
Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes
Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
New electric fish genus and species discovered in Brazil's Rio Negro
Discovery of a new species of electric knife fish in the Amazon Basin in Brazil is leading to a new interpretation of classifications and interrelationships among closely related groups. As the diversity of electric fishes becomes more thoroughly documented, researchers will be able to explore possible causes of this group's adaptive radiation over evolutionary time.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
NASA sees wind shear affecting newborn Tropical Cyclone Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack may have hurricane-force winds today, April 21, but strong vertical wind shear is expected to weaken the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Avian Conservation and Ecology
Lack of breeding threatens blue-footed boobies' survival
Blue-footed Boobies are on the decline in the Galapagos. A new study appearing in the journal Avian Conservation and Ecology indicates numbers of the iconic birds, known for their bright blue feet and propensity to burst into dance to attract mates, have fallen more than 50 percent in less than 20 years.
Galápagos Conservancy, Swiss Friends of Galápagos, Galápagos Conservation Trust

Contact: Will Ferguson
ferguswg@wfu.edu
509-954-2912
Wake Forest University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ecology team improves understanding of valley-wide stream chemistry
Understanding the chemistry of streams at a finer scale could help to identify factors impairing water quality and help protect aquatic ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, A.W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Kevin McGuire
kevin.mcguire@vt.edu
540-231-6017
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Environmental Health Perspectives
Fish consumption advisories fail to cover all types of contaminants
A new UTSC study suggests that fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers are ineffective in reducing infant exposure to contaminants like persistent organic pollutants.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Don Campbell
dcampbell@utsc.utoronto.ca
416-208-2938
University of Toronto

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature
Ancient sea-levels give new clues on ice ages
International researchers, led by the Australian National University (ANU), have developed a new way to determine sea-level changes and deep-sea temperature variability over the past 5.3 million years. The findings will help scientists better understand the climate surrounding ice ages over the past two million years, and could help determine the relationship between carbon dioxide levels, global temperatures and sea levels.

Contact: ANU Media Office
media@anu.edu.au
026-125-7979
Australian National University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
PLOS ONE
Declining catch rates in Caribbean green turtle fishery may be result of overfishing
A 20-year assessment of Nicaragua's legal, artisanal green sea turtle fishery has uncovered a stark reality: greatly reduced overall catch rates of turtles in what may have become an unsustainable take, according to conservation scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Florida.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Geology
Scratching the surface: Microbial etchings in impact glass and the search for life on Mars
Haley M. Sapers and colleagues provide what may be the first report of biological activity preserved in impact glass. Recent research has suggested that impact events create novel within-rock microbial habitats. In their paper, 'Enigmatic tubular features in impact glass,' Sapers and colleagues analyze tubular features in hydrothermally altered impact glass from the Ries Impact Structure, Germany, that are remarkably similar to the bioalteration textures observed in volcanic glasses.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Aquatic Toxicology
Fish exposed to antidepressants exhibit altered behavioral changes
Fish exposed to the antidepressant Fluoxetine, an active ingredient in prescription drugs such as Prozac, exhibited a range of altered mating behaviours, repetitive behaviour and aggression towards female fish, according to new research published on in the latest special issue of Aquatic Toxicology: Antidepressants in the Aquatic Environment.

Contact: Kitty van Hensbergen
c.hensbergen@elsevier.com
31-204-852-291
Elsevier

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Freshwater Invasives: Networking for Strategy (FINS) Conference
Management of Biological Invasions
EU must take urgent action on invasive species
The EU must take urgent action to halt the spread of invasive species that are threatening native plants and animals across Europe, according to a scientist from Queen's University Belfast. The threats posed by these species cost an estimated 12 billion each year across Europe. Professor Jaimie Dick, from the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen's is calling on the EU to commit long-term investment in a European-wide strategy to manage the problem.

Contact: Anne-Marie Clarke
comms.officer@qub.ac.uk
44-028-909-75320
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature
Study provides crucial new information about how the ice ages came about
An international team of scientists has discovered new relationships between deep-sea temperature and ice-volume changes to provide crucial new information about how the ice ages came about.

Contact: Becky Attwood
r.attwood@soton.ac.uk
University of Southampton

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite adds up Tropical Cyclone Ita's Australian soaking
After coming ashore on April 11, Tropical Cyclone Ita dropped heavy rainfall over the weekend that caused flooding in many areas of northeastern Australia's state of Queensland. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM gathered data on rainfall that was used to create a rainfall map at NASA.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah still raining on Philippines
Several regions in the south and central Philippines have flood advisories as the remnants of now dissipated Tropical Depression Peipah continue to linger over the country. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at the remnant clouds from its orbit in space on April 15.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Folia Parasitologica
Bizarre parasite may provide cuttlefish clues
University of Adelaide research into parasites of cuttlefish, squid and octopus has uncovered details of the parasites' astonishing life cycles, and shown how they may help in investigating populations of their hosts.

Contact: Dr. Sarah Catalano
61-437-574-880
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Fisheries
Making dams safer for fish around the world
The pressure changes that many fish experience when they travel through the turbulent waters near a dam can seriously injure or kill the fish. Scientists from around the world, including areas like Southeast Asia and Brazil where huge dams are planned or under construction, are working together to protect fish from the phenomenon, known as barotrauma.
US Army Corps of Engineers, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah over Southern Philippines
Tropical Depression Peipah has been very stubborn and has moved over the southern and central Philippines bringing clouds, showers and gusty winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ita over the Coral Sea
Tropical Cyclone Ita made landfall in northeastern Queensland, Australia, on April 11 as a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, moved south and re-emerged in the Coral Sea on April 14 where NASA's TRMM and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellites captured imagery of the weakened storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1262.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


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