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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1343.

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Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Grouse moor burning causes widespread environmental changes
Evidence of the environmental effects of moorland burning is published today in the first authoritative scientific study on the subject, with the aim of relieving tensions on both sides of the grouse moor management debate.
Natural Environment Research Council, Yorkshire Water

Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Biodiversity in the Mediterranean is threatened by alien species
Humans have introduced nearly a thousand species from other seas into the Mediterranean with very serious impact on its unique flora and fauna, finds new study to be published in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
press@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Smithsonian scientists discover coral's best defender against an army of sea stars
Coral reefs face a suite of perilous threats in today's ocean. From overfishing and pollution to coastal development and climate change, fragile coral ecosystems are disappearing at unprecedented rates. Despite this trend, some species of corals surrounding the island of Moorea in French Polynesia have a natural protector in their tropical environment: coral guard-crabs. New research has helped unravel the complex symbiotic relationship between these crabs and the coral reefs they live in and defend.
University of Florida, BIOCODE Mo'orea Project

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Physics of Fluids
Laser-guided sea monkeys show how zooplankton migrations may affect global ocean currents
Sea monkeys have captured the popular attention of both children and aquarium hobbyists because of their easily observable life cycle. Physicists are interested in a shorter-term pattern: Like other zooplankton, brine shrimp vertically migrate in large groups throughout the day in response to changing light conditions. New research suggests that the collective movement of small marine organisms could affect global ocean circulation patterns on a level comparable to the wind and the tides.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton
The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton -- microscopic aquatic plants important for fish populations and Earth's carbon cycle.
NASA

Contact: Patrick Lynch
patrick.lynch@nasa.gov
301-286-3854
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Rachel before losing hurricane status
Tropical Storm Rachel strengthened into a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 27-28, only to weaken back into a tropical storm by Sept. 29. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rachel before it weakened and took a visible picture of the storm off Baja California's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri winding down over open ocean
Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to appear more like a cold front on satellite imagery as it transitions into an extra-tropical storm over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone triggers warnings in Northwestern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone on Sept. 29 and captured a picture of the storm that showed thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the storm's center, and a large band of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the east. Phanfone is now a threat to various islands and warnings are in effect.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Half of global wildlife lost, says new WWF report
Between 1970 and 2010 populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe dropped 52 percent, says the 2014 Living Planet Report released today by World Wildlife Fund (WWF). This biodiversity loss occurs disproportionately in low-income countries -- and correlates with the increasing resource use of high-income countries.

Contact: Brendan Rohr
Brendan.rohr@wwfus.org
202-495-4621
World Wildlife Fund

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Ocean acidification could lead to collapse of coral reefs
Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Carnegie Institute of Science researchers have measured a roughly 40 percent reduction in the rate of calcium carbonate deposited in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in the last 35 years, likely caused by ocean acidification. If the trend continues, it could damage the reef framework and endanger the entire coral ecosystem, with the loss of its magnificent and highly diverse flora and fauna.
Israel Science Foundation, Moore Foundation

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Naturwissenschaften
Dolphins are attracted to magnets
Dolphins are indeed sensitive to magnetic stimuli, as they behave differently when swimming near magnetized objects. So says Dorothee Kremers and her colleagues at Ethos unit of the Université de Rennes in France, in a study in Springer's journal Naturwissenschaften -- The Science of Nature. Their research, conducted in the delphinarium of Plančte Sauvage in France, provides experimental behavioral proof that these marine animals are magnetoreceptive.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
2015 DOE JGI's science portfolio delves deeper into the Earth's data mine
In selecting 32 new projects with samples from diverse environments for the 2015 Community Science Program (CSP), the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute shifts 'from solving an organism's genome sequence to enabling an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do.' The total allocation of the CSP 2015 portfolio is expected to exceed 60 trillion bases -- the equivalent of 20,000 human genomes of plant, fungal and microbial genome sequences.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Global Change Biology
Climate change appears a mixed bag for a common frog
After warmer winters, wood frogs breed earlier and produce fewer eggs, a Case Western Reserve University researcher has found. Michael F. Benard also found that frogs produce more eggs during winters with more rain and snow.
University of Michigan, Michigan Society of Fellows, Case Western Reserve University

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Naturwissenschaften
Tooth buried in bone shows prehistoric predators tangled across land, sea
Before dinosaurs, it was thought the top aquatic and terrestrial predators didn't often interact. But researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Tennessee discovered that the smaller of the two apex predators was potentially targeting the larger animal.

Contact: Rosaire Bushey
busheyr@vt.edu
540-231-5035
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Science
Poor fish harvests more frequent now off California coast
In the past 600 years off the California coast, occasional episodes of diminished ocean upwelling that cause fish populations to crash have occurred naturally. The poor yearly fish harvests seen in the last 60 years aren't any worse in severity than earlier, but are happening more frequently.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri's spiral bands of soaking thunderstorms
Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to strengthen on its north-northwestern track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's TRMM satellite identified a band of thunderstorms containing heavy rainfall northwest of the storm's center. Meanwhile NASA's Aqua satellite got a look at the entire storm and saw that those bands of storms circled the entire storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
NASA identifies cold cloud tops in Tropical Storm Rachel
NASA's Aqua satellite saw the area of strong thunderstorms with colder cloud tops had grown within the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Rachel.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Sensitive youngsters
Young sea stars from the Baltic Sea suffer more from the effects of ocean acidification than adults. In a laboratory experiment, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel showed that younger animals already eat less and grow more slowly at only slightly elevated carbon dioxide concentrations. Their results are now published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Cell
How plankton gets jet lagged
The hormone melatonin, which governs sleep and jet lag in humans, may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at EMBL Heidelberg have found. They discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings indicate that melatonin's role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.
European Research Council

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Storm Kammuri coming together
When NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri the VIIRS instrument aboard took a visible picture of the storm that showed bands of thunderstorms wrapped around its center. The storm appears to be coming together as circulation improves and bands of thunderstorms have been wrapping into the low-level center of circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Satellite catches an oval-shaped Tropical Storm Rachel
NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted the eighteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific grow into a tropical storm that was renamed Rachel today, Sept. 25, 2014. Wind shear is affecting the tropical storm, however, so it doesn't have a rounded appearance on satellite imagery.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Water research tackles growing grassland threat: Trees
Two Kansas State University biologists are studying streams to prevent tallgrass prairies from turning into shrublands and forests.
National Science Foundation Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research Program, Kansas Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Study finds global sea levels rose up to 5 meters per century at the end of the last 5 ice ages
Land-ice decay at the end of the last five ice ages caused global sea-levels to rise at rates of up to 5.5 meters per century, according to a new study.
Natural Environment Research Council, Australian Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Science
Earth's water is older than the sun
Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth's water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work found that much of our solar system's water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space.

Contact: Conel Alexander
calexander@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
NASA sees System 98W become Tropical Depression Kammuri
Strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation in tropical low pressure System 98W were seen on infrared satellite imagery and were a clue to forecasters that the storm was intensifying. Early on Sept. 24, the storm intensified into Tropical Depression Kammuri far north of Guam.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1343.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>


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