Press Releases

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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1534.

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Public Release: 12-Jul-2015
Science Advances
How clouds get their brightness
How clouds form and how they help set the temperature of the earth are two of the big remaining questions in climate research. Now, a study of clouds over the world's remotest ocean shows that ocean life is responsible for up to half the cloud droplets that pop in and out of existence during summer.
US Department of Energy, NASA, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Newest NOAA fisheries survey ship begins West Coast and Alaska whale survey
NOAA's newest research ship, the Reuben Lasker, departed San Diego this week on its first scientific mission, which includes surveying gray whales along the West Coast. The survey will also search the Gulf of Alaska for right whales, among the most rare and endangered whales on Earth. The expedition is a collaboration between the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, California, and Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Satellite shows newborn Tropical Depression 01C form in Central Pacific
NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw that Hawaii is in the middle of a triangle of tropical cyclones. Tropical Depression 01C formed hundreds of miles southwest of Hawaii on July 10.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Satellite shows newborn Tropical Depression 02C form in Central Pacific
OAA's GOES-West satellite saw that Hawaii is in the middle of a triangle of tropical cyclones. Tropical Depression 02C formed over 700 hundred miles south-southeast of Hawaii on July 10.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
NASA looks at Typhoon Chan-Hom's strongest winds on approach to China
RapidScat spotted Chan-Hom's strongest winds away from Taiwan as it approached mainland China for landfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Satellite shows Post-Tropical Depression Ela northeast of Hawaii
NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw that Hawaii is in the middle of a triangle of tropical cyclones. Post-Tropical Depression Ela was located northeast of Hawaii on July 10, and the forecast calls for the storm to move west toward the islands over the weekend of July 11 and 12 and dissipate.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Nangka leaving the Marianas
NASA's Aqua satellite saw the massive Typhoon Nangka moving out of the Marianas Islands, while NASA's RapidScat instrument pinpointed the location of its strongest winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
To avoid dangerous shark encounters, information trumps culling
California scientists found that the risk of white shark attack for individual ocean users in California has fallen strikingly, by over 91 percent, since 1950, in a study to be published online ahead of print in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment later this month. Information that empowers ocean users to avoid the large predators is far more effective for public safety than culling sharks.
Lenfest Ocean Program

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
American Fisheries Society 145th Annual Meeting
International fisheries conference bringing thousands of scientists to Portland
Thousands of fisheries scientists from around the world will gather in Portland Aug. 16-20 for what is likely to be one of the largest-ever conferences of the American Fisheries Society, featuring hundreds of presentations and talks on the latest advances in fisheries research and conservation.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Tropical Storm Ela becomes the Central Pacific's first named storm
Tropical Storm Ela was born in the western-most part of the Eastern Pacific Ocean but has become the Central Pacific's first named storm. NASA's Aqua satellite took a look at the storm that's already battling wind shear to survive.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Linfa making landfall in southeastern China
Tropical Storm Linfa was making landfall in southeastern China early on July 9 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm. Linfa is now paralleling the coast in a southwesterly direction.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Chan-Hom's strongest winds in northern and eastern quadrants
The RapidScat instrument perched on the International Space Station provides measurements of surface winds and saw that Typhoon Chan-Hom's strongest winds were in its northern and western quadrants as it moved through the Marianas Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NASA's Aqua satellite observes Supertyphoon Nangka
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Supertyphoon Nangka on July 9 and provided a visible and an infrared view of the large storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
NOAA, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie
NOAA is predicting 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years and could become the second worst behind the record-setting 2011 bloom.The bloom will be expected to measure 8.7 on the severity index with a range from 8.1 to potentially as high as 9.5. This is more severe than 2014's 6.5, and may equal or exceed 2013, which had the second worse bloom this century.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
U-M, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie
University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues predict that the 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years and could become the second-most severe behind the record-setting 2011 bloom.
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NASA's Applied Science Health and Air Quality Program, Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Erb Family Foundation, U-M Graham Sustainability Institute

Contact: Laura Lessnau
llessnau@umich.edu
734-647-1851
University of Michigan

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Nature
Where iron and water mix
A new study demonstrates that chemical-laden plumes erupted from vents at one section of Mid Ocean Ridge in the southeast Pacific can be traced all the way across the Pacific for more than 4,000 kilometers. It also shows how the iron can be brought to the surface oceans of Antarctica where it has the potential to serve as a key life-sustaining micronutrient, supporting removal of carbon from the sunlit upper waters of that ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Assessing quality of flowing waters with DNA analyses
The quality of waters can be assessed using of the organisms occurring therein. This approach often results in errors, because many species look alike. Therefore, new methods focus on DNA analyses instead. Biologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have optimized the process so that they are now able to identify many organisms at once in a quick and reliable manner using short DNA sequences. The results have been published in the PLOS ONE magazine.

Contact: Dr. Florian Leese
florian.leese@rub.de
49-234-322-5072
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Global trends show seabird populations dropped 70 percent since 1950s
UBC research shows world's monitored seabird populations have dropped 70 percent since the 1950s, a stark indication that marine ecosystems are not doing well.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science
Integrating past warm climate data, scientists hone future sea-level rise predictions
In a recent review of the science on past sea-level rise and climate change, climate scientists including Robert DeConto of the University of Massachusetts Amherst survey modeling and other methods used to reconstruct past sea levels and say we are verging on a new era of understanding how quickly the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets may respond to warming, and what rates of sea-level change might accompany such change.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Current Biology
Human activities, shifts in local species reshaping coastal biodiversity
While human activities have caused extinctions across the globe, your favorite beach or diving site may actually be home to as many, or more, species then it was a few decades ago. That's the conclusion of a synthesis of 50 years of marine biodiversity data conducted by University of British Columbia researchers.

Contact: Silvia Moreno-Garcia
silvia.moreno-garcia@science.ubc.ca
604-827-5001
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science
Global sea levels have risen 6 meters or more with just slight global warming
A new review analyzing three decades of research on the historic effects of melting polar ice sheets found that global sea levels have risen at least six meters, or about 20 feet, above present levels on multiple occasions over the past three million years. What is most concerning is that amount of melting was caused by an increase of only 1-2 degrees (Celsius) in global mean temperatures.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anders Carlson
acarlson@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-3625
Oregon State University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science
Managing mining of the deep seabed
The International Seabed Authority is meeting on July 15 to decide on a regulatory framework for mining in the deep-sea floor. In a paper published this week in Science, researchers from the Center for Ocean Solutions and co-authors from leading institutions around the world propose a strategy for balancing commercial extraction of deep-sea resources with protection of diverse seabed habitats.

Contact: Kristi Boosman
kboosman@stanford.edu
650-850-1136
Center for Ocean Solutions

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Coral Reefs
New study showed spawning frequency regulates species population networks on coral reefs
New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species' network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
GSA Bulletin
New database documents submarine landslides
Submarine landslides, also known as mass transport deposits (MTDs), are common in marine environments and pose risks to coastal communities and offshore infrastructure. This new 332-point database presented by Lorena Moscardelli and Lesli Wood is drawn from studies of multiple MTDs around the world. Understanding these MTDS, they write, will help determine the extent of ancient submarine landslides and contribute to the development geo-models for forecasting future submarine slides.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
NASA sees powerful winds around Typhoon Nangka's center
The RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station measured Typhoon Nangka's powerful winds as it continues to move through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1534.

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