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Press Releases

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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1325.

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Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
GPM measured Tropical Storm Adjali's rainfall before dissipation
Moderate rainfall was occurring around the center of Tropical Storm Adjali before it dissipated, according to data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
China's new 'Great Wall' not so great
China's second great wall, a vast seawall covering more than half of the country's mainland coastline, is a foundation for financial gain -- and also a dyke holding a swelling rush of ecological woes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Adjali making the curve
Tropical Storm Adjali started curving to the southwest on its trek through the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Nov. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Study: Environmental bleaching impairs long-term coral reproduction
Professor Don Levitan, chair of the Department of Biological Science, writes in the latest issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series that bleaching -- a process where high water temperatures or UV light stresses the coral to the point where it loses its symbiotic algal partner that provides the coral with color -- is also affecting the long-term fertility of the coral.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
'Aquatic osteoporosis' jellifying lakes
North American lakes are suffering from declining calcium levels, says new research from Queen's University.

Contact: Rosie Hales
rosie.hales@queensu.ca
613-533-6000 x77513
Queen's University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
As CO2 acidifies oceans, scientists develop a way to measure effect on marine ecosystems
Man-made emissions have dramatically increased the CO2 content of oceans and acidified their surface waters. Now scientists in Israel have for the first time developed a way to quantify how acidification is affecting marine ecosystems on an oceanic basin scale. Studying a 5,000 km strip of ocean, they developed a new way to assess overall calcification rates of coral reefs and open sea plankton based on variations in surface water chemistry.
Israel Science Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Israeli Ministry of Science and Technology

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Fountain of youth underlies Antarctic Mountains
In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, scientists explain why the ice-covered Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica looks as young as they do.
National Science Foundation, UK NERC; German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Resources

Contact: Kim Martineau
kimlynnmartineau@gmail.com
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Virulent bacteria affecting oysters found to be a case of mistaken identity
The bacteria that helped cause the near-ruin of two large oyster hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest have been mistakenly identified for years, researchers say in a recent report. In addition, the study shows that the bacteria now believed to have participated in that problem are even more widespread and deadly than the previous suspect.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Claudia Hase
claudia.hase@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7001
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Adjali develop a tail
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, the MODIS instrument aboard captured a picture of Tropical Cyclone Adjali that showed it developed a 'tail,' which is actually band of thunderstorms extending south of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Fish and Fisheries
History's lesson reveals depth of fish catch decline
Scientists in Australia have used historic media to measure the decline in Queensland's pink snapper fishery, highlighting a drop of almost 90 percent in catch rates since the 19th century.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Calcium loss turning lakes to 'jelly'
Declining calcium levels in some North American lakes are causing major depletions of dominant plankton species, enabling the rapid rise of their ecological competitor: a small jelly-clad invertebrate. Scientists say increasing 'jellification' will damage fish stocks and filtration systems that allow lakes to supply drinking water, and that lakes may have been pushed into 'an entirely new ecological state.'

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New paper identifies virus devastating sea stars on Pacific Coast
Specimens from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have helped explain the mysteriously sudden appearance of a disease that has decimated sea stars on the North American Pacific Coast.
National Science Foundation, Cornell University's David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
EARTH Magazine: How much natural hazard mitigation is enough?
It's a question that arises in the wake of most natural disasters: What steps can society take to protect itself from storms, floods, landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis or volcanic eruptions?

Contact: Megan Sever
msever@earthmagazine.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
NASA sees the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season awaken
The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season has formed over 300 miles from Diego Garcia. When NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Adjali the VIIRS instrument aboard took a visible picture of the storm that showed bands of thunderstorms wrapped around its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Worldwide ship traffic up 300 percent since 1992
New satellite data reveal a whopping boost in shipping.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Tiny fish provides giant insight into how organisms adapt to changing environment
An Indiana University-Dartmouth College team has identified genes and regulatory patterns that allow some organisms to alter their body form in response to environmental change.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Hanchett
jimhanch@indiana.edu
812-856-5490
Indiana University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Evolutionary constraints revealed in diversity of fish skulls
In the aquatic environment, suction feeding is far more common than biting as a way to capture prey. A new study shows that the evolution of biting behavior in eels led to a remarkable diversification of skull shapes, indicating that the skull shapes of most fish are limited by the structural requirements for suction feeding.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Densovirus named top suspect in devastating sea star wasting disease
Since 2013, millions of sea stars native to the Pacific coast of North America from Baja California to southern Alaska have succumbed to a mysterious wasting disease in which their limbs pull away from their bodies and their organs exude through their skin; a disease researchers say could trigger an unprecedented ecological upheaval under the waves.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Extinction risk not the answer for reef futures
Leading coral reef scientists in Australia and the USA say there needs to be a new approach to protecting the future of marine ecosystems, with a shift away from the current focus on extinction threat.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Warmest oceans ever recorded
This summer has seen the highest global mean sea surface temperatures ever recorded. Temperatures even exceed those of the record-breaking 1998 El Nino year.
International Pacific Research Center

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Ocean carbon uptake more variable than thought
The Earth's oceans are thought to have taken up about one quarter of the carbon dioxide that humans pumped into the atmosphere in the past two decades. While this drives acidification and has consequences for sea life, it also moderates the rate of climate change.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Oryx
Combatting illegal fishing in offshore marine reserves
Conservation scientists say there needs to be a new approach to protecting offshore marine reserves. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, who are attending the conference, have found a way to predict illegal fishing activities to help authorities better protect marine reserves.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
Linking diet to human and environmental health
The world is gaining weight and becoming less healthy, and global dietary choices are harming the environment.

Contact: James Badham
james@bren.ucbs.edu
805-893-5049
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
Stock market models help NYU researchers predict animal behavior
Modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market has been discovered to predict aspects of animal behavior. The movement of zebrafish when mapped is very similar to the stochastic jump process, a mathematical model used by financial engineers. The model could improve the effectiveness of experiments, minimize the number of fish used, and allow researchers to make better use of their data following experiments.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
UT Arlington team says non-genetic changes can help parents or offspring, not both
A new study from The University of Texas at Arlington challenges current theory about how an organism changes physical characteristics because of its environment.

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1325.

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