Press Releases

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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1738.

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Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Tagging project confirms Sea of the Hebrides importance to basking sharks
A pioneering three-year project to learn some of the secrets of Scotland's basking sharks by using satellite tag technology has shown an area off the west coast to be truly important for these giant fish.

Contact: Duncan Sandes
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Biogeosciences
Study reveals climate change impacts on Buzzards Bay
An analysis of long-term, water quality monitoring data reveals that climate change is already having an impact on ecosystems in the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, Mass. The impacts relate to how nitrogen pollution affects coastal ecosystems.
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
NASA measures winds in Tropical Cyclone Victor
NASA's RapidScat instrument found the strongest winds in Tropical Cyclone Victor were occurring south of its center on Jan. 20, 2016. Imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite revealed that Victor still maintained hurricane-strength and an eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
Environmental Science and Technology
How ocean acidification and warming could affect the culturing of pearls
Pearls have adorned the necklines of women throughout history, but some evidence suggests that the gems' future could be uncertain. Increasingly acidic seawater causes oyster shells to weaken, which doesn't bode well for the pearls forming within. But, as scientists report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, the mollusks might be more resilient to changing conditions than previously thought.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
Journal of Applied Ecology
Researchers measure fish abundance in lakes using a few water samples
Researchers from Universite Laval and Quebec's Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks have shown that the DNA suspended in lake water can be used to effectively estimate the abundance of fish living in it. The details of this new approach, which could revolutionize how fish stocks are managed in lakes, are presented in a recent issue of the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Contact: Jean-François Huppé
Jean-Francois.Huppe@dc.ulaval.ca
418-656-7785
Université Laval

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
Gloop from the deep sea
ETH scientists are researching the unusual secretions of the hagfish. Over the next three years, the researchers will try to find out how this natural hydrogel can be harnessed for human use.

Contact: Simon Kuster
simon.kuster@hest.ethz.ch
41-446-320-809
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Small but deadly: The chemical warfare of sea slugs
Brightly colored sea slugs are slurping deadly chemicals and stockpiling the most toxic compounds for use on their enemies. While the phenomenon sounds like the stuff of horror films, it is common practice for these "butterflies of the ocean", a new University of Queensland-led study published today in PLOS One has found.
Australian and Pacific Science Foundation, Australian Research Council (ARC), University of Queensland, Australian Government Postgraduate Endeavour Award, Mexican Council for Science and Technology

Contact: Karen Cheney
k.cheney@uq.edu.au
61-733-657-386
University of Queensland

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
Soft Robotics
'Squishy' robot fingers aid deep sea exploration
Researchers have designed the first application of soft robotics for the non-destructive sampling of fauna from the ocean floor Their recent expedition in the Red Sea successfully demonstrated the new technology, which could enhance researchers' ability to collect samples from largely unexplored habitats thousands of feet beneath the ocean surface, areas that scientists believe are biodiversity hotspots teeming with unknown life. The soft grippers also could be useful in underwater archaeology.
National Geographic Innovation Challenge Grant, National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Karoff
karoff@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-0450
Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
Nature
Rising carbon dioxide emissions pose 'intoxication' threat to world's ocean fish
UNSW Australia researchers have found that carbon dioxide concentrations in seawater could reach levels high enough to make fish 'intoxicated' and disoriented many decades earlier than previously thought, with serious implications for the world's fisheries.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-047-849-2060
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Exercise helps young baleen whales develop ability to store oxygen for extended dives
Baleen whale calves develop oxygen-carrying myoglobin as they mature, and exercise may drive the key component of early development, according to a study published Jan. 20, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Rachel Cartwright from the California State University, Channel Islands, and colleagues.

Contact: Kayla Graham
kgraham@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Nature Climate Change
Livermore scientists find global ocean warming has doubled in recent decades
Lawrence Livermore scientists, working with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and university colleagues, have found that half of the global ocean heat content increase since 1865 has occurred over the past two decades.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
NASA sees wide-eyed Tropical Cyclone Victor
NASA satellites and instruments have been monitoring Tropical Cyclone Victor, a hurricane in the South Pacific Ocean with a large eye. NASA's Aqua satellite, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and the RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station have all gathered data on the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Marine Biology
NSU researcher studying potential invasive species in S. Gulf of Mexico
Studying invasive species is the specialty of Matthew Johnston, Ph.D., a researcher at NSU's Guy Harvey Research Institute. His latest research centers around the diminutive regal damselfish, found in non-native waters in the southern Gulf of Mexico.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
'Twilight zone' fish swim silently with forked tails
An international team of researchers has identified a way to predict which reef fish can live across a greater range of depths, increasing their chances of surviving natural disasters such as cyclones and coral bleaching. They found that tail shape can help predict if a fish is likely to exist across a range of water depths.
Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Jenny Lappin
Jennifer.Lappin@jcu.edu.au
61-049-952-3939
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 18-Jan-2016
Marine Biodiversity
Living fossils and rare corals revealed
A team of Australian and German researchers has published their analysis of data, specimens, photographs and video footage collected in 2009, when they sent a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to a depth of 800 meters (2,625 ft) at Osprey Reef off the far-northern coast of eastern Australia.

Contact: Linden Woodward
linden.woodward@jcu.edu.au
61-742-321-007
James Cook University

Public Release: 18-Jan-2016
Queen's University in new partnership to fight against invasive species
The rapid spread of invasive species across Europe, which currently threatens native plants and animals at a cost of €12 billion each year, is to face a major new barrier. Leading scientists at Queen's University Belfast, the Institute of Technology, Sligo (project-lead) and Dublin-based INVAS Biosecurity, have announced a new partnership after securing €320,000 from the Environmental Protection Agency for new research towards controlling, preventing and eventually eradicating such alien species.
US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Anne-Marie Clarke
comms.officer@qub.ac.uk
44-028-909-75310
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 18-Jan-2016
Nature Geoscience
Explosive underwater volcanoes were a major feature of 'Snowball Earth'
Around 720-640 million years ago, much of the Earth's surface was covered in ice during a glaciation that lasted millions of years. Explosive underwater volcanoes were a major feature of this 'Snowball Earth,' according to new research led by the University of Southampton.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 18-Jan-2016
Environmental Research Letters
To clean up ocean plastics focus on coasts, not the Great Pacific garbage patch
The most efficient way to clean up ocean plastics and avoid harming ecosystems is to place plastic collectors near coasts, according to a new study.

Contact: Hayley Dunning
h.dunning@imperial.ac.uk
020-759-42412
Imperial College London

Public Release: 16-Jan-2016
Extra-Tropical Alex speeding through north Atlantic
Tropical Storm Alex quickly acquired extra-tropical characteristics late on Jan. 15, 2016 as it sped northward toward Greenland in the North Atlantic Ocean. A GOES-East satellite image on Jan. 16, 2016 showed the elongated system south of Greenland.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
NASA provides in-depth analysis of unusual Tropical Storm Alex
NASA has provided forecasters with a variety of data on the out-of-season tropical cyclone Alex. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided valuable temperature data, the RapidScat instrument identified the strongest winds, the GPM core satellite provided rainfall rates and cloud heights, and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Former Hurricane Pali peters out near Equator
Imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite has shown that former Hurricane Pali has petered out near the Equator.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Tropical Cyclone Victor born in South Pacific Ocean, Cook Islands on alert
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of newborn Tropical Cyclone Victor in the South Pacific Ocean. On Jan. 15 a gale warning was in effect for Rakahanga, Manihiki, Suwarrow, Nassau and Pukapuka in the Northern Cook Islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
NASA sees Tropical Depression Pali headed toward Equator
NASA's Aqua satellite imagery showed just a small area of strong thunderstorms remained in the now weaker Tropical Depression Pali as it moved closer to the Equator. NASA's RapidScat instrument measured surface winds in the storm as it was weakening to a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Oh, snap! What snapping shrimp sound patterns may tell us about reef ecosystems
The tiny snapping shrimp's noisy habits could play a big role in reef ecology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tracey Peake
tracey_peake@ncsu.edu
919-515-6142
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
NASA sees formation of unusual North Atlantic Hurricane Alex
The low pressure area known as System 90L developed rapidly since Jan. 13 and became Hurricane Alex on Jan. 14. Several satellites and instruments captured data on this out-of-season storm. NASA's RapidScat instrument observed sustained winds shift and intensify in the system and NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm develop from a low pressure area into a sub-tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-East satellite data was made into an animation that showed the development of the unusual storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1738.

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