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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1400.

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Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Oryx
Farming a threat to endangered Chinese giant salamander
New research, led by international conservation charity Zoological Society of London, published in Oryx today shows that Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) farms risk the extinction of wild salamander populations instead of supporting their conservation.
Ocean Park Conservation Foundation -- Hong Kong, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden, Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund, Synchronicity Earth, Darwin Initiative

Contact: Nicola Manomaiudom
nicola.manomaiudom@zsl.org
44-020-744-96246
Zoological Society of London

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Tracking sea turtles across hundreds of miles of open ocean
How sea turtles find their way across hundreds of miles of open ocean has been an enduring mystery of animal behavior. Reporting results of a study at UMass Amherst's Large Pelagic Research Center, Kara Dodge says 'Adult turtles can pinpoint specific nesting beaches even after being away many years.' Results of a new GPS tracking study now document their remarkable ability.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and others

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
NASA looks inside and outside of Tropical Cyclone Pam
NASA's Terra satellite provided an outside look at Tropical Cyclone Pam while the RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station provided an inside look at the surface winds generated by the storm. The GPM core satellite provided another inside look at Pam and provided data on where the heavy rainfall was occurring within the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
NASA sees a Tropical Storm Haliba 'sandwich'
Tropical Storm Haliba appeared to be the 'filling' in a sandwich between the Southern Indian Ocean islands of La Reunion and Mauritius in NASA satellite imagery because wind shear pushed the bulk of the storm's clouds between the islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Same forces as today caused climate changes 1.4 billion years ago
Natural forces have always caused the climate on Earth to fluctuate. Now researchers have found geological evidence that some of the same forces as today were at play 1.4 billion years ago.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Journal of Glaciology
Friction means Antarctic glaciers more sensitive to climate change than we thought
A new study by Caltech researchers finds that incorporating Coulomb friction into computer models increases the sensitivity of Antarctic ice sheets to temperature perturbations driven by climate change.
Caltech's President's and Director's Fund program, Stanback Discovery Fund for Global Environmental Science

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Tiny new fossil helps rewrite crab evolution, sheds lights on late Jurassic marine world
A paper in the journal Nature Communications co-written by NHM Crustacea curator Dr. Jody Martin describes a 150-million-year-old crab larva fossil specimen from southern Germany. The new fossil provides critical evidence for understanding the early rise of crabs.

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedri@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Frontiers in Zoology
Blue blood on ice -- how an Antarctic octopus survives the cold
An Antarctic octopus that lives in ice-cold water uses an unique strategy to transport oxygen in its blood, according to research published in Frontiers in Zoology. The study suggests that the octopus's specialized blood pigments could help to make it more resilient to climate change than Antarctic fish and other species of octopus.

Contact: Joel Winston
Joel.Winston@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans
Small eddies produce global effects on climate change
The increasing strength of winds over the Southern Ocean has extended its ability to absorb carbon dioxide, effectively delaying the impacts of global warming. New research published in the Journal of Physical Research found the intensifying wind over that ocean increased the speed and energy of eddies and jets. The increased movement and overturning of these eddies and jets has accelerated the carbon cycle and driven more heat into the deep ocean.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Haliba affecting La Reunion and Mauritius islands
Tropical Cyclone Haliba formed east of the island nation of Madagascar in the Southern Indian Ocean and is now affecting the La Reunion and Mauritius islands. NASA's Terra satellite passed over Haliba on March 9 and captured an image of the storm that showed the eastern quadrant was affecting the two smaller islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
NASA eyes rainfall in newly formed Tropical Cyclone Pam
Tropical Cyclone Pam formed in the Solomon Islands in the Southern Pacific Ocean early on March 9. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite flew overhead and found some heavy rain occurring when it measured rainfall rates within the intensifying storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Science
Scientists urge Brazilian government to stand strong on aquatic animal protections
A team of Brazilian scientists -- including Luiz Rocha, Ph.D., Associate Curator of Ichthyology at the California Academy of Sciences -- is raising awareness about impending conservation setbacks for Brazil's aquatic animals, calling for immediate fisheries management collaboration between the nation's public and private sectors. The scientists say Brazil can transform this moment of political turmoil into positive action -- and become a leader among developing countries facing widespread extinction of aquatic fauna.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Is the tasty blue crab's natural range creeping north?
Scientists have observed the Atlantic (or Chesapeake) blue crab, a commercially important species, moving north of its native range into the Gulf of Maine.

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 15S meandering in Mozambique Channel
Tropical Cyclone 15S continued to meander in the Mozambique Channel of the Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured a picture of it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
EARTH Magazine: El Niño disaster stunted children's growth
Children born during, and up to three years after, the devastating 1997-1998 El Niño event in northern Peru were found to be shorter than their peers in a new study covered in EARTH Magazine.

Contact: Maureen Moses
mmoses@americangeosciences.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
Aquatic Mammals
New tool aids US conservation and management of whales, dolphins and porpoises
Researchers have identified more than 100 areas within US waters that should be considered biologically important when making management and regulatory decisions about human activities that could affect whales, dolphins and porpoises. The creation of Biologically Important Areas (BIAs) are described in a special issue of the journal Aquatic Mammals. Expert judgment was combined with published and unpublished data to identify 131 BIAs covering 24 species, stocks or populations in seven regions of the US.
NOAA, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, US Navy

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Stuck-in-the-mud plankton reveal ancient temperatures
New research in Nature Communications showing how tiny creatures drifted across the ocean before falling to the seafloor and being fossilized has the potential to improve our understanding of past climates.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
61-241-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
American Naturalist
Female fish that avoid mating with related species also shun some of their own
A new study offers insight into a process that could lead one species to diverge into two, researchers report in The American Naturalist. The study found that female killifish that avoid mating with males of a closely related species also are less likely to mate with males of their own species -- if those males come from an unfamiliar population.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Melting glaciers create noisiest places in ocean, study says
Researchers measure underwater noise in Alaskan and Antarctic fjords and find them to be the noisiest places in the ocean. This leads researchers to ask how animals such as whales and seals use the noise and what will happen to fjord ecosystems once the glaciers recede and the noise disappears.

Contact: Meghan Murphy
mmmurphy3@alaska.edu
907-474-7541
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
NASA sees Mozambique Channel's new tropical storm
Tropical Cyclone 15S formed in the Mozambique Channel of the Southern Indian Ocean, and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite gathered data on its rainfall rates.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Evolutionary Applications
Evolving to cope with climate change
Researchers have successfully measured the potential of the Atlantic Silverside to adapt to ocean acidification. This is the first such measurement for a vertebrate animal.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Miller
tim.miller@uconn.edu
860-486-4064
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Earth's Future
The tides they are a changin'
Scientists from the University of Southampton have found that ocean tides have changed significantly over the last century at many coastal locations around the world.
Natural Environmental Research Council, Engineering and Physical Science Research Council

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Journal of Coastal Research
Evidence indicates Yucatan Peninsula hit by tsunami 1,500 years ago
The eastern coastline of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, a mecca for tourists, may have been walloped by a tsunami between 1,500 and 900 years ago, says a new study involving Mexico's Centro Ecological Akumal and the University of Colorado Boulder.
Centro Ecological Akumal, United States Geological Survey

Contact: Charles Shaw
yucatanchas@hotmail.com
831-884-5635
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
New detector sniffs out origins of methane
An instrument identifies methane's origins in mines, deep-sea vents, and cows.
National Science Foundation, Shell Oil, Deep Carbon Observatory, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, German Research Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Science
Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find
An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. In a new study published March 6 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by University of Georgia ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Gavrilles
bethgav@uga.edu
706-542-7247
University of Georgia

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1400.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>


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