Press Releases

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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1737.

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Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Physics of Fluids
Will raindrops stick to a spider web's threads?
If you go out after a rain, you may notice spider webs glistening with water droplets. The soggy webs resemble human-made meshes for fog collection: They both have thin fibers that collect water from droplets in the air. Now researchers have developed a model to predict whether a falling droplet will stick to a thin fiber, and how much water residue will remain on the fiber, discussing their findings in this week's Physics of Fluids.

Contact: AIP Media Line
media@aip.org
301-209-3090
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
PeerJ
Swarming red crabs documented on video
A research team studying biodiversity at the Hannibal Bank Seamount off the coast of Panama has captured unique video of thousands of red crabs swarming in low-oxygen waters just above the seafloor.
Dalio Ocean Initiative

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
Ecological Applications
Combined effects of copper, climate change can be deadly for amphibians, research finds
Researchers at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory warn that the extinction to two amphibian species -- the southern toad and the southern leopard frog -- may be hastened by the combined effects of climate change and copper-contaminated wetlands.

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
Virginia continues to lead in clam and oyster aquaculture
Virginia shellfish farmers sold $48.3 million in clams and oysters in 2015, with hard clam sales of $32.3 million once again leading the nation and $16 million in oyster sales tops among US East Coast states.
Virginia SeaGrant

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
Submarine canyons in the mid-atlantic: Connecting science to management
Regional workshop held to explore submarine canyons science and management
On April 7, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean, a partnership among New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, hosted a workshop for a group of leading scientists and federal agency managers to discuss the state of current science for the deepsea canyons ecosystem and existing management programs that have jurisdiction over current and potential uses related to these canyons
Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean

Contact: Arlo Hemphill
ahemphill@midatlanticocean.org
202-746-3484
Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
Frontiers in Marine Science
Shark population threatened due to fin harvesting
A recent study shows that effective shark conservation in Indonesia only works when shark protection through no-fishing zones is combined with efforts to involve local communities in the management of their own fisheries and by providing alternatives to sustain their livelihoods.
Prime Minister's Australia-Asia Endeavour Award, Karl Mayer Foundation, Australian Postgraduate Award

Contact: Michelle Ponto
michelle.ponto@frontiersin.org
41-215-101-704
Frontiers

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
Ecology and Society
Restoring ecosystems -- how to learn from our mistakes
In a joint North European and North American study led by Swedish researcher Christer Nilsson, a warning is issued of underdocumented results of ecological restorations. The researchers show that continuous and systematic evaluations of cost-efficiency, planning, implementations and effects are necessary in order to make use of experiences in future projects. The results have been published in the journal Ecology and Society.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-706-040-334
Umea University

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Science of the Total Environment
Oil and gas wastewater disposal may harm West Virginia waterways
Unconventional oil and gas operations combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking,' to release natural gas and oil from underground rock. Studies have centered on potential water pollution from this process that may increase endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface and ground water. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri report high levels of EDC activity in the surface water near a hydraulic fracturing wastewater disposal facility in West Virginia.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Systems Biology and Applications
Dynamic model helps understand healthy lakes to heal sick ones
Development of a dynamic model for microbial populations in healthy lakes could help scientists understand what's wrong with sick lakes, prescribe cures and predict what may happen as environmental conditions change. Those are among the benefits expected from an ambitious project to model the interactions of some 18,000 species in a well-studied Wisconsin lake.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
NASA finds very heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Zena
Tropical cyclone Zena intensified over the open waters between Vanuatu and Fiji and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite known as GPM found very heavy rainfall and very high cloud tops.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Can corals keep up with ocean acidification?
An interdisciplinary team of researchers led by University of Delaware professors Wei-Jun Cai and Mark Warner has successfully measured both pH and carbonate ion concentration directly inside the calcifying fluid found in coral, an important development in the study of how ocean acidification will affect marine calcifying organisms such as corals and shellfish.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Bothum
pbothum@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Ecology of Freshwater Fish
Climate change may reduce vulnerable salmon populations
New research in north-central Mongolia illuminates the effects of global climate change on certain vulnerable species of salmon.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Ecology Letters
Marine reserves are critical for coral reef resilience
Due to the combined effect of human and natural disturbances, coral reefs are declining at an alarming rate.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Microbes take center stage in workings of 'the river's liver'
Scientists have found evidence that rising river waters deliver a feast of carbon to hungry microbes where water meets land, triggering increased activity and altering the flow of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
UOG scientists seek genetic reasons for coral reef survival
Coral reefs around the world are increasingly under threat from coral bleaching which destroys colonies and interrupts the food chain they support. Scientists at the University of Guam Marine Laboratory are using a new genetic sequencer to search for the biological mechanisms that allow some colonies to survive and thrive while others die.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Laura Biggs
laura.guamepscor@gmail.com
University of Guam

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Marine preserve to help penguins in a 'predictably unpredictable' place
New regulations by the government of Ecuador to protect the waters around the Galapagos Islands as a marine preserve, including main feeding areas for Galapagos penguins.

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Royal Society Open Science
Invasive species not best conservation tool: Study
Harnessing an invasive fish species sounded like a promising conservation tool to help reverse the destruction wreaked by zebra mussels on endangered native mollusks in the Great Lakes -- except that it won't work, says a University of Guelph ecologist.

Contact: Joe Ackerman
ackerman@uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 x58268
University of Guelph

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Crab shell signaling helps control the many faces of cholera, study shows
A new study of more than 50 samples of Vibrio cholerae isolated from both patients and the environment demonstrates the diversity and resourcefulness of the organism.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
NSB announces Public Service Award recipient
Today the National Science Board announced that Sea Education Association would be bestowed with its 2016 Public Service Award. This esteemed award honors exemplary public service in promoting public understanding of science and engineering. SEA is the sole recipient of the Public Service Award this year.

Contact: Brandon Powell
bjpowell@nsf.gov
703-292-2769
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
How deep does life go? MBL study describes microbial neighborhood beneath ocean floor
A team led by MBL Associate Scientist Julie Huber offers the first description of an active microbial community buried in cold oceanic crust at North Pond, an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
NASA's GPM views Tropical Cyclone Zena hitting Vanuatu
Tropical Cyclone Zena, formerly known as Tropical Cyclone 18P formed in the South Pacific Ocean near Vanuatu early on April 5, 2016. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core observatory satellite flew directly above the newly formed tropical cyclone and measured rainfall and cloud heights in the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Journal of Insect Science
Nanopillars on drone fly larvae allow them to avoid bacterial contamination
Rat-tailed maggots are known to live in stagnant, fetid water that is rich in bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, they are able to avoid infection by these microorganisms due to nanopillars on their cuticles.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Journal of Medical Entomology
Argentinian researchers develop trap for mosquito that transmits Zika
Argentinian researchers have developed a new trap that can be used to effectively monitor and control the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is the primary transmitter of Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever.
Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Técnica

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Cause of Maryland food poisoning outbreak traced to Asia
Vibrio parahaemolyticus caused an outbreak of food poisoning in Maryland in 2010. The pathogen strain sequenced from patients proved to be the same strain as one of those found in raw oysters from local restaurants, strong evidence that the oysters were the source of the illness. That particular strain of V. parahaemolyticus was not local, but was traced to Asia. The research is published March 18 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Contact: Aleea Khan
communications@asmusa.org
202-942-9365
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Diversity and Distributions
Mediterranean loggerhead turtles dying in waters off the Middle East and North Africa
Robin Snape, a postgraduate research student with the Marine Turtle Research Group at the Centre for Ecology and Conservation at Penryn Campus and a team of fellow conservation biologists found that many adult loggerhead turtles are migrate to areas of the Mediterranean where they are dying, trapped in fishing nets used by small scale fishing operations in Cyprus, the Middle East and North Africa.

Contact: Duncan Sandes
d.sandes@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1737.

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