Press Releases

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Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1734.

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Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Research with dolphins provides hope for prevention of diabetes in humans
Can butter help prevent diabetes? By comparing 55 fatty acids in blood levels of dolphins and their diets, scientists at the National Marine Mammal Foundation have discovered a specific dietary saturated fat, called heptadecanoic acid, that may help alleviate what's known as 'pre-diabetes' in humans. This new study supports a growing body of nutritional science showing that perhaps not all dietary saturated fats are bad, and -- in fact -- that some may be good.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Jennifer Cull
jennifer.cull@nmmf.org
619-840-5366
National Marine Mammal Foundation

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Nature
Scientists track monster waves below the ocean surface
A scientific research team spent seven years tracking the movements of skyscraper-high waves in the South China Sea. University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science scientists were part of the collaborative international field study trying to understand how these waves, which rarely break the ocean surface, develop, move and dissipate underwater.
The US Office of Naval Research, Taiwan National Science Council

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4061
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Journal of Animal Science
Going green: Microalgae as a feedstuff for grower steers
Engineers across the country have developed biofuels, food additives and skincare products using the adaptive power of microalgae. Livestock scientists see its potential as a sustainable, high-energy feedstuff as well as a protein supplement.
Solazyme

Contact: Kim Schoonmaker
kims@asas.org
American Society of Animal Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
A handy field guide to the nearshore marine fishes of Alaska
Even experienced biologists can have difficulty identifying the juvenile phases of many species of fish. This new handy field guide will help solve that problem with taxonomic photos of more than 100 species of fish in their juvenile phase, including the conventional, the cute, and the totally bizarre.

Contact: Maggie Mooney-Seus
Marjorie.Mooney-Seus@noaa.gov
206-526-4348
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Exploring evolution via electric fish hybrid zone
Michigan State University is using a $700,000 National Science Foundation grant to study how electric fish signals evolve, research that could offer insights into the evolution of new species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Biomaterials
New mussel-inspired surgical protein glue: Close wounds, open medical possibilities
Inspired by nature's wonders, Korean scientists have developed new light-activated adhesive hydrogel that is mussel protein-based. The innovative surgical protein glue, called LAMBA, not only closes an open wound on a wet bleeding site within less than 60 seconds but also effectively facilitates the healing process without inflammation or a scar.
Marine Biotechnology Program of Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Global Ph.D Fellowship Program of Korean Ministry of Education

Contact: Ms. YunMee Jung
ymjung@postech.ac.kr
82-054-279-2417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Ecology Letters
Study sheds light on the ability of different marine species to respond to climate warming
In Eastern Australia, the ocean has been warming at a rate that's four times that of the global average. Many marine species have been appearing further south than they ever have before, while others have stayed put.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Science and technology help Navy prepare for future Arctic operations
Last week, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Mat Winter was the Navy keynote speaker at the Sixth Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Maritime and Naval Operations. He discussed how naval assets could operate safely in an increasingly accessible Arctic.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Satellite data shows Tropical Cyclone Halola getting stronger
NASA data pinpointed the area of strongest sustained winds on July 19 and the extent of those winds expanded on July 20 as Halola became a tropical storm again.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Climate Change
Ocean acidification may cause dramatic changes to phytoplankton
A team of researchers from MIT, the University of Alabama, and elsewhere has found that such increased ocean acidification will dramatically affect global populations of phytoplankton -- microorganisms on the ocean surface that make up the base of the marine food chain.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Ecology Letters
Marine travellers best able to adapt to warming waters
Marine species that already roam far and wide throughout our oceans are extending their territories further and faster in response to climate change, according to new research involving the University of Southampton and an international team of biodiversity experts.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Ecology Letters
As the oceans warm, wide-ranging species will have an edge
Marine species that already have large ranges are extending their territories fastest in response to climate change, according to new research from University of British Columbia biodiversity experts. The study is one of the first comprehensive looks at how traits -- other than thermal niche -- impact marine animals' ability to respond to climate change. It could help improve global predictions of how different species redistribute as the oceans warm, and identify species in greatest jeopardy.

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Climate Change
Why offspring cope better with climate change -- it's all in the genes!
In a world first study, researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have unlocked the genetic mystery of why some fish are able to adjust to warming oceans. In a collaborative project with scientists from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, the researchers examined how the fish's genes responded after several generations living at higher temperatures predicted under climate change.
Australian Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Ecology from treetop to bedrock: Human influence in Earth's critical zone
In the narrow space between treetops and bedrock is a critical zone holding all of the life-sustaining resources supporting terrestrial life on earth. At an organized session on Critical Zone Ecology at the 100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, ecologists will describe how they work with geologists, hydrologists, climate scientists, and others to expand the disciplinary dimensions of their understanding of watersheds.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Nangka moving into Sea of Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nangka after it made landfall and was moving into the Sea of Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
'PlankZooka' larval sampler may revolutionize deep-ocean research
Scientists have conducted the first high-volume collection of deep-ocean plankton, including animal larvae, using a robotic sampling device mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle. The new device allows researchers to sample precise areas, at depth, for long periods of time, while gently filtering enough volume to collect rare organisms without damaging them. Researchers from Duke, Oregon and Woods Hole deployed the large-tubed device, nicknamed Plankzooka, earlier this month.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees thunderstorms flaring up on Halola's eastern side
NASA infrared satellite imagery taken early on July 17 shows strong thunderstorms on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Halola.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Dolores weakening
Hurricane Dolores weakened to a tropical storm early on July 17 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and gathered infrared information about the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Tropical storm Enrique re-classified as a Tropical Storm
Although it appeared that Tropical Storm Enrique had weakened to a tropical depression, satellite data revealed that there was still some punch left in the system and it was re-classified a tropical storm on July 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Centuries-old shipwreck discovered off North Carolina coast
Researchers have discovered a centuries-old shipwreck off the coast of North Carolina. Artifacts around the wreck, including bricks, bottles and navigation gear, appear to date it to the late 18th or early 19th century. Scientists from Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of Oregon and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution were on an NSF-funded expedition using sonar scanning technology and the submersible vessel Alvin.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
ZooKeys
A fish too deep for science
Scientists from the Smithsonian Institution describe a new goby fish species that lives deeper than its closest relatives and had gone unnoticed up until now. It has been discovered between 70 and 80 m in the southern Caribbean as part of the institution's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP). The species was named in recognition of the Curasub submersible used in the exploration. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Carole Baldwin
baldwinc@si.edu
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
Summertime plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead.
NASA, US Department of Energy, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Scientific Reports
Carbon dioxide pools discovered in Aegean Sea
The location of the second largest volcanic eruption in human history, the waters off Greece's Santorini are the site of newly discovered opalescent pools forming at 250 meters depth. The interconnected series of meandering, iridescent white pools contain high concentrations of carbon dioxide and may hold answers to questions related to deep-sea carbon storage as well as provide a means of monitoring the volcano for future eruptions.
EU Eurofleets Program, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, National Science Foundation, NASA's Astrobiology Program

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Science
Oceans slowed global temperature rise, scientists report
A new study of ocean temperature measurements shows that in recent years, extra heat from greenhouse gases has been trapped in the subsurface waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans, thus accounting for the slowdown in the global surface temperature increase observed during the past decade, researchers say.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Nangka knocking on Japan's door
Typhoon Nangka was knocking on Japan's door when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on July 16. Satellite imagery showed that Nangka's northern quadrant began spreading over southeastern Japan. The GPM core satellite spotted towering thunderstorms in Nangka's western side.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1734.

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