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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1312.

<< < 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 > >>

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
PLOS ONE
Stress makes snails forgetful
New research on pond snails has revealed that high levels of stress can block memory processes. Researchers from the University of Exeter and the University of Calgary trained snails and found that when they were exposed to multiple stressful events they were unable remember what they had learned.
Alberta Innovates -- Health Solutions and Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
NASA investigates Typhoon Haiyan's intense rainfall
As Typhoon Haiyan has been strengthening, NASA's TRMM satellite investigated how much rain was falling throughout the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
NASA sees warm sea surface helped strengthen Tropical Storm 30W
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and revealed that warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear enabled Tropical Depression 30W to strengthen into a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
Frontiers
Frontiers launches 2 new open-access journals: Frontiers in Earth Science and Frontiers in Environmental Science
Frontiers launches two new open-access journals: Frontiers in Earth Science and Frontiers in Environmental Science.

Contact: Katerina Michalakakou
katerina.michalakakou@frontiersin.org
41-021-510-1712
Frontiers

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
Looking for tomorrow's power source? Go fly a (underwater) kite
As the world looks to wean itself from fossil fuels, a new answer may be emerging: underwater kites. A professor of mechanical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to explore ways to harness ocean currents and tidal flows using this unexpected technology. The payoff could be significant. For example, the potential power output of just the Florida Current could be equivalent to 10 nuclear power plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Dorsey
mwdorsey@wpi.edu
508-831-5609
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
Journal of Physical Oceanography
VC predicts the motion of the ocean
The Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University has just published research that will help you every morning with the surf report.

Contact: ANU Media Hotline
media@anu.edu.au
61-026-125-7979
Australian National University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
NASA sees Tropical Depression 30W affecting central Philippines
Tropical Depression 30W formed and moved through Visayas, Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
Journal of Heredity
Dolphin genetic study provides revelations
A 10-year study found genetic differences in dolphins that were along geographic lines (onshore, offshore and even within same general area, such as the Indian River Lagoon in Fla.).

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
NASA sees strengthening Tropical Storm Haiyan lashing Micronesia
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Haiyan on Nov. 4 and infrared data showed a large area of powerful thunderstorms affecting Micronesia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
NASA saw heavy rain in Typhoon Krosa before it hit wind shear
NASA's TRMM Satellite observed heavy rainfall occurring in Typhoon Krosa before it ran into strong wind shear. On Nov. 1, Krosa was a Typhoon that was threatening Hainan Island, China and Vietnam. By Nov. 4 after moving through the South China Sea, Krosa weakened to a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
NASA video shows birth and death of Tropical Storm Sonia
Tropical Storm Sonia formed on Friday, Nov. 1 from the eighteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
Diversity and Distributions
Global change: Stowaways threaten fisheries in the Arctic
The increased sea temperature expected in 2100 will in itself mean that the potential number of species introduced by ships will increase more than sixfold in the Norwegian Archipelago Svalbard in the Arctic Ocean. These are the findings of a new international study. Add to this the fact that the number of ships sailing in the Arctic will also increase and there is good reason to be on guard.

Contact: Chris Ware
cware@utas.edu.au
61-497-568-763
Aarhus University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
Environmental Impact Assessment Review
Assessing noise impact of offshore wind farm construction may help protect marine mammals
Growth in offshore wind generation is expected to play a major role in meeting carbon reduction targets around the world, but the impact of construction noise on marine species is yet unknown. A group of scientists from the United Kingdom and the United States have developed a method to assess the potential impacts of offshore wind farm construction on marine mammals, particularly the noise made while driving piles into the seabed for wind turbine foundations.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 3-Nov-2013
Nature
Life, but not as we know it
A rudimentary form of life that is found in some of the harshest environments on earth is able to sidestep normal replication processes and reproduce by the back door, researchers at The University of Nottingham have found.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Emma Thorne
emma.thorne@nottingham.ac.uk
44-011-595-15793
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
2 satellites see new Eastern Pacific tropical depression form
The eighteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed early on the first day of Nov. and is expected to become a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
NASA satellite catches a wide-eyed Typhoon Krosa
Typhoon Krosa became wide-eyed in imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite as the storm moved past the Philippines and into the South China Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
Going deep to study long-term climate evolution
A Rice University-based team of geoscientists is going to great lengths -- from Earth's core to its atmosphere -- to investigate a mystery about Earth's long-term climate. The team has a new federal grant to study the role that deep-Earth processes play in climate evolution over million-year timescales.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
New methods improve quagga and zebra mussel identification
The earliest possible detection of quagga and zebra mussels has long been a goal of biologists seeking to discover their presence in water bodies. The Bureau of Reclamation's Detection Laboratory has released two reports identifying a new sampling method to improve the accuracy of quagga and zebra mussel detection while still at the microscopic larval stage.

Contact: Peter Soeth
psoeth@usbr.gov
303-445-3615
Bureau of Reclamation

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
NASA sees Halloween Typhoon Krosa lashing Luzon, Philippines
There's nothing more scary for Halloween than a typhoon, and the residents in Luzon, in the northern Philippines are being lashed by Typhoon Krosa today, Oct. 31.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
The secret's in the (robotic) stroke
Recent studies from two research teams at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University demonstrate how underwater robots can be used to understand and influence the complex swimming behaviors of schooling fish. The teams, led by Associate Professor Maurizio Porfiri, published two separate papers in the journal PLOS ONE. These studies are the latest in a significant body of research by Porfiri and collaborators utilizing robots, specifically robotic fish, to impact collective animal behavior.
National Science Foundation, Mitsui USA Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
hamilton@poly.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
Tagging aquatic animals can disrupt natural behavior
American and Canadian researchers have for the first time quantified the energy cost to aquatic animals when they carry satellite tags, video cameras and other research instruments.

Contact: T. Todd Jones
todd.jones@noaa.gov
808-366-9824
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Science
Is global heating hiding out in the oceans?
In a reconstruction of Pacific Ocean temperatures in the last 10,000 years, researchers have found that its middle depths have warmed 15 times faster in the last 60 years than they did during apparent natural warming cycles in the previous 10,000.

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Science
Global warming as viewed from the deep ocean
Yair Rosenthal of Rutgers, Braddock Linsley of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Delia W. Oppo of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, used the shells of tiny single-celled, bottom-dwelling foraminifera found in sediment cores to reconstruct the Pacific Ocean's heat content over the last 10,000 years. Their paper has been published in Science.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ken Branson
kbranson@ucm.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x633
Rutgers University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2013
American Naturalist
Animal personalities are more like humans than first thought, according to Deakin University study
A Deakin University study has found for the first time that, just like humans, unpredictability is also a consistent behavioral trait in the animal world.

Contact: Mandi O'Garretty
mandi.ogarretty@deakin.edu.au
61-352-272-776
Deakin University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Krosa approach the Philippines
NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites captured visible and infrared data on intensifying Tropical Storm Krosa as it heads for a landfall in the northern Philippines.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1312.

<< < 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 > >>


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