Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1736.

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Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Nature Communications
A whale of a tale
Scientists have found that the gut microbiome of right whales and other baleen species shares characteristics with both cows and meat-eating predators. The dual microbial communities allow whales to extract the most nutrition possible from their diet, digesting not only the copepods they eat, but their chitin-rich shells as well.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Storm Ida meandering
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ida on September 22, it was meandering and going in circles in the Central Atlantic Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Satellite sees Tropical Storm Malia moving away from Hawaiian Islands
Tropical Storm Malia is on a northwesterly track and continued to move away from the Hawaiian Islands on Sept. 22 as NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research uncovers microsopic key to reducing ocean dead zones
Microbiologists at BYU, with financial backing from the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Agriculture, are addressing the global environmental issue of ocean dead zones. Their research, the most recent of which publishes this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is discovering the potential of naturally occurring bacteria called rhizobia to stem the tide of oversaturation with nitrogen-based fertilizers.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agrictulture

Contact: Todd Hollingshead
toddh@byu.edu
801-422-8373
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Remnants of Tropical Depression 16E raining over US Southwest
The remnants of Tropical Depression 16E (TD16E) have moved over the US Southwest and an infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the associated clouds over Arizona and New Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Geology
The Karoo Basin and the end Permian mass extinction
Earth's biosphere witnessed its greatest ecological catastrophe in the latest Permian, dated to about 251.9 million years ago. The current model for biodiversity collapse states that both marine and terrestrial animals were impacted simultaneously, as a consequence of global climate change.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
NASA sees formation of Tropical Depression 21W
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over a developing tropical low pressure area in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Sept. 21 when the latest depression was coming together. The AIRS instrument aboard Aqua used infrared light to determine temperatures of cloud tops and where the strongest storms were located.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Methane observatories successfully deployed in the Arctic
Mysteries still abound about methane release from the ocean floor. Two state of the art observatories have been deployed in the Arctic this summer, to try and unveil the secrets of natural release of the climate gas.
Norwegian Research Council

Contact: Anna Silyakova
anna.silyakova@uit.no
47-776-46603
CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Coral Reefs
New weapon against the reef eaters
James Cook University scientists in Australia have made a breakthrough in the war against a deadly enemy of the Great Barrier Reef.

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
61-747-814-942
James Cook University

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Satellites see Tropical Depression 16E's landfall in northwestern Mexico
Tropical Depression 16E made landfall in northwestern Mexico on Sept. 21 and NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured imagery of the storm that is bringing heavy rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
GPM sees powerful storms within Tropical Storm Ida
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission satellite looked at Tropical Storm Ida in the Central Atlantic and identified the areas of heaviest rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Species extinction can doom parasites important for ecosystem health
The effects of an animal population's extinction may echo beyond the original species, new University of Georgia research finds. Loss of a population could ultimately result in the extinction of parasites -- which are critical for a healthy ecosystem. UGA researchers focused this particular study on a Brazilian fish community and their associated parasites.

Contact: Tad Dallas
tdallas@uga.edu
University of Georgia

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Science Advances
How a frog's molecules 'leaped,' and 'crawled,' to evolve violet vision
The African clawed frog's process for adaptive color vision is full of mysterious twists and turns. 'A series of strange coincidences happened at the right time, at the right spot, for the right species,' says evolutionary biologist Shozo Yokoyama.
National Institutes of Health, Emory University

Contact: Carol Clark
carol.clark@emory.edu
404-727-0501
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Nature Climate Change
One-two punch of rising seas, bigger storms may greatly magnify US East coast floods
Many studies predict that future sea-level rise along the US Atlantic and Gulf coasts will increase flooding. Others suggest that the human-caused warming driving this rise will also boost the intensity and frequency of big coastal storms. Now, a new study quantifies how they could interact to produce alarming spikes in the combined height and duration of flooding. It projects that coastal flooding could possibly shoot up several hundredfold by 2100, from the Northeast to Texas.

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Blue crabs more tolerant of low oxygen than previously thought
Findings of low-oxygen tolerance among blue crabs contradict earlier studies, thus helping to explain what had been somewhat of an ecological mystery.
Northeast Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
El Niño and La Niña will exacerbate coastal hazards across Pacific
Predicted increases of severe El Niño and La Niña events will cause an upsurge in storm events leading to extreme coastal flooding and erosion in populated regions across the Pacific Ocean.

Contact: Jocelyn Prasad
jocelyn.prasad@sydney.edu.au
61-434-605-018
University of Sydney

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Nature Geoscience
El Niño and La Niña will exacerbate coastal hazards across entire Pacific
The projected upsurge of severe El Niño and La Niña events will cause an increase in storm events leading to extreme coastal flooding and erosion in populated regions across the Pacific Ocean.
US Geological Survey, University of Sydney, University of New South Wales, University of Waikato, and others

Contact: Leslie Gordon
lgordon@usgs.gov
650-329-4006
US Geological Survey

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Zoological Journal of the Linnaean Society
Africa's earliest known coelacanth found in Eastern Cape
Various specimens of Africa's earliest coelacanth have been found in a 360-million-year-old fossil estuary near Grahamstown, in South Africa's Eastern Cape. More than 30 complete specimens of the new fossil species, Serenichthys kowiensis, were collected from the famous Late Devonian aged Waterloo Farm locality, by paleontologist Dr. Robert Gess and described by him in collaboration with Professor Michael Coates of the University of Chicago.

Contact: Schalk Mouton
schalk.mouton@wits.ac.za
27-117-171-017
University of the Witwatersrand

Public Release: 21-Sep-2015
Current Biology
As polar ice melts, seabed life is working against climate change
When it comes to climate change, it's rare to get any good news. But a researcher who's reported evidence in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. 21, after more than two decades of study, has some: the loss of sea ice over Antarctic waters in some areas has led to the increased growth of creatures living on the seafloor. Those underwater assemblages are acting as an important and unexpected carbon sink.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 18-Sep-2015
GSA 2015 Annual Meeting & Exposition
GSA meeting highlights & technical program -- media advisory 2
More than 7,000 geoscientists will be presenting 4,700 abstracts at the Geological Society of America's Annual Meeting & Exposition in Baltimore, Maryland, Nov. 1-4, 2015. The scientific program schedule is online now.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2015
Satellite shows Tropical Depression 9 weakening
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression 9 weakening in the Central Atlantic on Sept. 18, 2015. Tropical Depression 9 is battling wind shear and dry air, both of which are taking the life out of it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees Typhoon Krovanh's winds tightly around center
The RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station gathered surface wind data on Typhoon Krovanh and identified the speed and location of the strongest winds as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2015
Nature Communications
Southern Ocean: Reconstructing environmental conditions over the past 30,000 years
In the last 30,000 years there was, at times, more mixing in the Southern Ocean than previously thought. This meant that vast quantities of nutrients were available to phytoalgae, which in turn contributed to storing the greenhouse gas CO2 during the last glacial period.

Contact: Dr. Folke Mehrtens
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12007
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
NOAA awards $2.1 million for observation, forecasting, mitigation of harmful algal blooms
NOAA announced today 12 new research grants totalling nearly $2.1 million that will go to organizations from around the country seeking to address harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia, two of the most scientifically complex and economically damaging coastal issues.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
NASA sees Marianas Islands at 5 o'clock within Typhoon Krovanh
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the circular Typhoon Krovanh in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, the Marianas Islands were in the storm's southeastern quadrant, and looked like five o'clock in the storm clouds' circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1736.

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