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Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1338.

<< < 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 > >>

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
TRMM satellite sees Tropical Storm Dylan make landfall in Queensland
As Tropical Storm Dylan was making landfall in Queensland on Jan. 30, NASA's TRMM satellite was capturing rainfall data on the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Environmental Reviews
Researchers identify 9 steps to save waterways
The key to clean waterways and sustainable fisheries is to follow nine guiding principles of water management, says a team of Canadian biologists.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
NASA satellite sees System 91S undeveloped in Mozambique Channel
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite that observed the tropical low pressure area designated as System 91S earlier this week captured another look at a much weaker storm on Jan. 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Journal of Marine Ecology Progress
New study examines the effects of catch-and-release fishing on sharks
A new study led by scientists at the University of Miami Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science investigated how several species of coastal sharks respond to stress from catch-and-release fishing. The results revealed that each of the shark species responded differently. Hammerhead sharks were by far the most vulnerable to fighting on a fishing line.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
786-256-4446
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
NASA gets 2 views of Tropical Cyclone Dylan making landfall in Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Dylan and captured both visible and infrared imagery of the storm as it began landfalling.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Sea the future: New research on ocean conditions will aid planners
The Office of Naval Research Global announced this week a grant to the University of Melbourne that will provide new insights into ocean conditions -- crucial information for Navy planners involved in tactical and strategic decision-making.

Contact: Peter Vietti
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Marine Biology
At last: Mysterious ocean circles in the Baltic Ocean explained
Are they bomb craters from World War II? Are they landing marks for aliens? Since the first images of the mysterious ocean circles off the Baltic coast of Denmark were taken in 2008, people have tried to find an explanation. Now researchers from the University of Southern Denmark and University of Copenhagen finally present a scientific explanation.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Study measures how well Asian carp prevention effort will work
Scientists from the University of Notre Dame, Resources for the Future, and the US Forest Service present their findings of the effectiveness of different Asian carp prevention barriers could be in a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Contact: Marion Wittmann
Marion.E.Wittmann.3@nd.edu
574-631-2502
University of Notre Dame

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 11P headed for Queensland
The NASA-NOAA Satellite known as Suomi NPP flew over newborn Tropical Cyclone 11P in the Coral Sea and captured a visible image of the newly developed storm as it moves toward a landfall in Queensland, Australia. Tropical Cyclone 11P developed from the low pressure area previously known as System 99P.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
TRMM satellite peers at rainfall in developing low near Mozambique
The TRMM satellite flew above a System 91S, a tropical low pressure area, in the Mozambique Channel on Jan. 28, 2014, at 1011 UTC/5:11 a.m. EST. TRMM data collected with this pass may be helpful in evaluating this low for possible tropical cyclone formation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Nature
Sponge bacteria, a chemical factory
A new, unknown strain of bacteria produces most of the bioactive substances that the stony sponge Theonella swinhoei exudes. An international research team led by ETH Zurich professor Jörn Piel describes these natural products, the associated genes and strain of bacteria in a publication in Nature.

Contact: Joern Piel
jpiel@ethz.ch
41-446-330-755
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Deaths attributed directly to climate change cast pall over penguins
Climate change is killing penguin chicks from the world's largest colony of Magellanic penguins, not just indirectly -- by depriving them of food, as has been repeatedly documented for these and other seabirds -- but directly as a result of drenching rainstorms and, at other times, heat, according to new findings from the University of Washington.

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Lithosphere
Rio Grande fift, Rum Jungle complex, Black Sea, West Africa craton, California faults
The February 2014 Lithosphere is now online. Papers cover strain rates measured in travertine in the Rio Grande rift, central New Mexico; age dating of the granitic Neoarchean Rum Jungle complex, Australia; the first lithosphere-scale illustration of the structural evolution of the Black Sea Basin; geodynamic modeling of craton formation; evaluation of the central Garlock fault in Pilot Knob Valley, California; and analysis of Anza network-USArray station seismic records of San Jacinto fault (California) activity.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting
2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Discover the latest in oceanography; press registration open
At the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting discover the latest in the ocean sciences. News media registration is open; reserve hotel room now.

Contact: Mary Catherine Adams
mcadams@agu.org
202-777-7530
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Chemosphere
Research shows arsenic, mercury and selenium in Asian carp not a health concern to most
Researchers at the Prairie Research Institute's Illinois Natural History Survey have found that overall, concentrations of arsenic, selenium, and mercury in bighead and silver carp from the lower Illinois River do not appear to be a health concern for a majority of human consumers.

Contact: Jeffrey Levengood
levengoo@illinois.edu
217-333-6767
Prairie Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Interface
'Chameleon of the sea' reveals its secrets
The cuttlefish, known as the "chameleon of the sea," can rapidly alter both the color and pattern of its skin, helping it blend in with its surroundings and avoid predators. In a paper published Jan. 29 in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the Harvard-MBL team reports new details on the sophisticated biomolecular nanophotonic system underlying the cuttlefish's color-changing ways.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Watches up in Australia as NASA sees System 99P developing
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical low pressure area designated as System 99P and infrared data shows that the low is getting organized.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
NASA spots developing tropical system affecting Mozambique's Nampala Province
NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on a developing area of tropical low pressure known as System 91S that was brushing the Nampala Province of Mozambique on January 28.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
EuroScience Open Forum 2014
5 Nobel Laureates attending EuroScience Open Forum in Copenhagen
Five Nobel Laureates will be among the speakers at Europe's largest general science event. 4,500 delegates and 30,000 visitors are expected for EuroScience Open Forum 2014 that takes place in the historic Carlsberg City District this summer. Registration for the forum has now opened.

Contact: Peter Krause
pkr@fi.fk
45-91-33-79-15
EuroScience Open Forum 2014

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Ocean acidification research should increase focus on species' ability to adapt
Not enough current research on marine ecosystems focuses on species' long-term adaptation to ocean acidification creating a murky picture of our ocean's future, according to an international study led by a University of British Columbia zoologist.

Contact: Jennifer Sunday
sunday@zoology.ubc.ca
604-789-1997
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Geological Society of America Bulletin
GSA Bulletin covers the US, Italy, Iran, Jamaica, Chile, and Argentina, and China
Learn more about river morphology in Oregon; coastal responses to sea level; the Tertiary Sabzevar Range, Iran; carbon-dioxide sequestration; fault systems in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica; Villarrica Volcano, Chile; landslide modeling; the southern Bighorn Arch, Wyoming; high-diversity plant fossil assemblages of the Salamanca Formation, Argentina; Upper Cretaceous strata, Western Interior Seaway; stratigraphy in Italy; the Soreq drainage, Israel; faulting in Surprise Valley, California; and the Qiantang River estuary, eastern China.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Geology
Is there an ocean beneath our feet?
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from the Earth's oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought. Seismologists at Liverpool have estimated that over the age of the Earth, the Japan subduction zone alone could transport the equivalent of up to three and a half times the water of all the Earth's oceans to its mantle.

Contact: Sarah Stamper
sarah.stamper@liv.ac.uk
01-517-943-044
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
University of Hawaii scientists make a big splash
Researchers from the University of Hawaii, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and University of California discovered that interplanetary dust particles could deliver water and organics to the Earth and other terrestrial planets. "It is a thrilling possibility that this influx of dust has acted as a continuous rainfall of little reaction vessels containing both the water and organics needed for the eventual origin of life on Earth and possibly Mars," said Hope Ishii, study co-author.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Scientists reveal why life got big in the Earth's early oceans
Why did life forms first begin to get larger and what advantage did this increase in size provide? UCLA biologists working with an international team of scientists examined the earliest communities of large multicellular organisms in the fossil record to help answer this question.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Island Biology 2014
Island Biology 2014: An International Conference on Island Evolution, Ecology, and Conservation
Islands are renowned for their extraordinary biota -- inspiring biologists and providing key insights into evolution, biogeography, and ecology. As a result of the devastating effects of human colonization, island ecosystems face severe threats, and island conservation has become a vital international concern. Examining a broad range of taxa, regions, and biological disciplines, attending biologists will share insights and develop collaborations to accelerate the pace and effectiveness of island research and conservation.

Contact: Donald Drake, University of Hawaii at Manoa
island.biology@gmail.com
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1338.

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