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Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1736.

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Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
NCMA launches national training program to better identify harmful algal blooms
The National Center for Marine Algae and Macrobiota at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences is developing a program to train the next generation of scientists and managers in the taxonomy of harmful marine algae, a key step in rebuilding and maintaining expertise critical to managing the impacts of harmful algal blooms in every US coastal region. An award by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration initiated a three-year project that will run through August 2018.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Darlene Trew Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
NASA's GPM analyzes Tropical Depression 9 rainfall
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite passed over Tropical Depression 9 in the Central Atlantic and looked at the rainfall rates within the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Omega-3's are vital for a healthy ocean
A new study published this week in Nature Scientific Reports reveals that the 'ocean-fleas' which play a vital role in maintaining a healthy ocean depend on omega-3's to survive. These 2 mm long creatures, called copepods, rank amongst the most abundant animals on our planet. An abundance of copepods results in lots of fish as well as an ocean better able to remove carbon from the atmosphere.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
Marine and Freshwater Research
Griffith Researchers show ocean response to Red Dawn
The 'Red Dawn' dust storm which enveloped Sydney in 2009 left more than just a huge clean-up bill in its wake. Griffith researchers have shown for the first time that the Tasman Sea marine ecosystem was also affected by the intense dust storm.

Contact: Melinda Rogers
melinda.rogers@griffith.edu.au
047-849-4898
Griffith University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
Current Biology
Sponge cells build skeletons with pole-and-beam structure
Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. 17 have found that sponges build their skeletons in a completely different way than other animals do. In fact, the building process looks a lot like the construction of man-made buildings, minus the architectural plans.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
Environmental Science and Technology
Ban on microbeads offers best chance to protect oceans, aquatic species
An outright ban on the common use of plastic 'microbeads' from products that enter wastewater is the best way to protect water quality, wildlife, and resources used by people, a group of conservation scientists suggest in a new analysis.
David H. Smith Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program

Contact: Stephanie Green
stephanie.green@science.oregonstate.edu
778-808-0758
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat and Aqua satellite see Tropical Depression 9 developing
The ninth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season developed in the central Atlantic on Sept. 16, 2015. The day before, NASA's RapidScat instrument analyzed the surface winds of the developing low pressure area and found tropical-storm-force winds in one quadrant of the system. NASA's Aqua satellite looked at the depression and saw that it was already being affected by wind shear.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Restoring ocean health
More than a decade ago, California established marine protected areas (MPAs) in state waters around the northern Channel Islands off the coast of Santa Barbara. Several years later, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration extended these MPAs into the federal waters of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
U-M researchers to study Detroit River phosphorus, impacts of green infrastructure
Researchers at the University of Michigan have been awarded a three-year, $3 million grant from the Erb Family Foundation to determine the Detroit River's contributions to algae blooms that plague Lake Erie each summer.
Erb Family Foundation

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone
The first true three-dimensional picture of submarine canyon habitats has been produced using a unique combination of marine robotics and ship-based measurements. The information captured in this new set of maps ranges in scale from the 200km canyon down to the size of an individual cold-water coral polyp, and will be used to inform the management of the only English Marine Conservation Zone in deep water.
European Research Council, Natural Environmental Research council, DEFRA

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
NASA mapped heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm Vamco
Tropical Storm Vamco was a short-lived tropical storm but brought large amounts of rainfall to southeastern Asia. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite measured the rainfall over four days and showed some impressive totals.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
NASA sees a comma-shaped Tropical Storm Krovanh over Marianas
The Marianas Islands in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean were in the tail of Tropical Storm Krovanh's 'comma shape' when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on Sept. 16.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
PLOS ONE
Counting underwater vital for marine conservation
Understanding how genetic diversity occurs within species is paramount for conservation, according to University of Queensland scientists. The new research by UQ biologists has identified regions of high and low multi-species genetic diversity in Australia's marine waters. Lead author and Honorary Research Fellow with UQ's School of Biological Sciences, Lisa Pope said the varying genetic diversity had implications for both marine conservation and broader understanding of how species form.
University of Queensland

Contact: Dr. Lisa Pope
l.pope@uq.edu.au
61-042-976-4433
University of Queensland

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Young chum salmon may get biggest nutrition boost from Elliott Bay restored beaches
University of Washington researchers have found the types of organisms in Seattle's Elliott Bay change depending on the shoreline nearby, either armored or restored beaches. Young chum salmon adjusted their diets based on these changes.
National Science Foundation, Seattle Department of Transportation

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
NASA gets infrared view of new Tropical Storm 20W
The twentieth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean formed early on Sept. 14 and became a tropical storm the next day, triggering a tropical storm watch. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the low pressure area as it was consolidating and saw powerful thunderstorms circling the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
New DNA research reveals genetic heritage of elusive vaquita
A new method of teasing information from scarce and highly degraded genetic samples is helping NOAA Fisheries and Mexican scientists unravel the genetic heritage of the enigmatic vaquita, the most endangered marine mammal on Earth.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 15-Sep-2015
Review of Scientific Instruments
New tool for studying magnetic, self-propelled bacteria that resemble compass needles
In the Marvel Comics universe, Professor Xavier and the X-Men are only able to fend off archrival Magneto, the magnetic mutant with the ability to control metals, once they understand the scope of his powers. To better understand the behavior of the microbial world's Magnetos -- magnetically influenced water-dwellers known as magnetotactic bacteria -- three researchers have developed a tool that allows these microscopic species to be studied more easily, especially in their natural environment.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Biology Letters
A more acidic ocean will bend the mermaid's wineglass
New research from the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories shows that a more acidic ocean can weaken the protective shell of a delicate alga. The findings, published Sept. 9 in the journal Biology Letters, come at a time when global climate change may increase ocean acidification.
National Science Foundation, Mediterranean Sea Acidification Program

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Research shows evolution in real time
In ongoing research to record the interaction of environment and evolution, a team led by University of California, Riverside biologist David Reznick has found new information illustrating the evolution of a population of guppies. Working in a river in Trinidad, the researchers determined which male guppies would contribute more offspring to the population as well as which would live longer and which would have a shorter lifespan.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
NASA's RapidScat catches a day in the short life of Tropical Storm Vamco
Tropical Storm Vamco lived for two days in the South China Sea. On the day it developed into a depression the RapidScat instrument aboard the International Space Station provided forecasters data on its surface winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Journal of the Marine Biology Association of the United Kingdom
Researchers find major gaps in understanding risks, benefits of eating fish
Fish tissue is rarely measured for concentrations of both harmful contaminants and healthful nutrients across a range of species and geographic regions, say a Dartmouth researcher and her colleagues who reviewed the risks and benefits of eating seafood.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Ecological Economics
Protected areas save mangroves, reduce carbon emissions
Protected areas not only keep significant swaths of Indonesia's shrinking mangrove habitats intact, but also prevent emissions of carbon dioxide that would have been released had these mangroves been cleared, according to a study in the journal Ecological Economics.
Linden Trust for Conservation and Roger and Victoria Sant

Contact: Erin McKenzie
erin.mckenzie@duke.edu
919-613-3652
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Engineer receives rapid NSF support to probe water woes in Flint, Michigan
A Virginia Tech engineer is traveling to Flint, Michigan, this week as part of a National Science Foundation-funded $50,000 one-year study into a 'perfect storm' of water distribution system corrosion problems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steven Mackay
smackay@vt.edu
540-231-4787
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 14-Sep-2015
Global Change Biology
World's turtles face plastic deluge danger
An international study led by a University of Queensland researcher has revealed more than half the world's sea turtles have ingested plastic or other human rubbish. The study, led by Dr. Qamar Schuyler from UQ's School of Biological Sciences, found the east coasts of Australia and North America, Southeast Asia, southern Africa, and Hawaii were particularly dangerous for turtles due to a combination of debris loads and high species diversity.
Australian Research Council Linkage Project, Earthwatch Australia, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Healthy Waterways and Australia Zoo

Contact: Dr. Qamar Schuyler
q.schuyler@uq.edu.au
61-427-566-868
University of Queensland

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Remnants of ex-Tropical Storm Linda spreading inland
NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the remnants of former Tropical Storm Linda begin to spread inland over the northern Baja Peninsula of Mexico, and they are expected to affect the southwestern US over the next couple of days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1736.

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