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Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1286.

<< < 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 > >>

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Tropical Depression Humberto fizzling, 2 areas developing
Imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite on Sept. 19 showed Tropical Depression Humberto had lost its organization, while one tropical low struggled near Bermuda, and another one was taking shape in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
NASA sees heavy rains and hot towers in Hurricane Manuel
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Manuel on Sept. 19 at 0116 UTC and measured its rainfall as it was strengthening into a hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
NASA sees Usagi become a typhoon
What was a tropical storm rapidly intensified into Typhoon Usagi within 24 hours as it moves through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Journal of Morphology
Mantas, devil rays butchered for apothecary trade now identifiable
Dried filters from the mouths of filter-feeding rays started appearing in apothecary shops in recent years, but there's been no way to know which of these gentle-natured rays was being slaughtered. Now scientists have discovered enough differences to identify the giant manta and eight devil rays using the dried filters.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
The coelacanth leads a monogamous life
Scientists have successfully analyzed the genetic make-up of the offspring of pregnant coelacanth females for the first time. They found that the likelihood that the offspring is fathered by one single individual is very high -- unlike with many other fish species. Dr. Kathrin Lampert from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Professor Dr. Manfred Schartl from the University of Würzburg, together with their colleagues, report about their findings in the journal "Nature Communications."

Contact: Dr. Kathrin Lampert
kathrin.lampert@rub.de
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Yellow peril: Are banana farms contaminating Costa Rica's crocs?
Shoppers spend over £10 billion on bananas annually and now this demand is being linked to the contamination of Central America's crocodilians. New research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, analyzes blood samples from spectacled caiman in Costa Rica and finds that intensive pesticide use in plantations leads to contaminated species in protected conservation areas.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Geosphere
Geosphere, GSA's dynamic online-only journal posts 9 new articles in Sept.
Geosphere has posted additions to several themed issues: History and Impact of Sea-Level Change Offshore New Jersey; Geodynamics and Consequences of Lithospheric Removal in the Sierra Nevada, California; Cenozoic Tectonics, Magmatism, and Stratigraphy of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region and Adjacent Areas; Origin and Evolution of the Sierra Nevada and Walker Lane. Two other articles cover terrestrial laser scanning and the earthquake hazard of the Hat Creek fault.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Journal of Experimental Biology
True colors: Female squid have 2 ways to switch color, according to a UCSB study
The female common market squid -- Doryteuthis opalescens -- may not be so common after all. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have discovered that this glamorous cephalopod possesses a pair of stripes that can sparkle with rainbow iridescence. These flank a single stripe, which can go from complete transparency to bright white.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Biomacromolecules
X-ray science taps bug biology to design better materials and reduce pollution
Bug spray, citronella candles, mosquito netting -- most people will do anything they can to stay away from insects during the warmer months. But those creepy crawlers we try so hard to avoid may offer substantial solutions to some of life's problems.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Usagi's central and southern power
Powerful thunderstorms wrapped around Tropical Storm Usagi's center and its southern quadrant in visible data from NASA's Aqua satellite on Sept. 18.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Tropical Storm Humberto makes an 'A' for Atlantic on satellite imagery
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Humberto on Sept. 17, the MODIS instrument aboard took a picture of the storm and it resembled the letter "A" as it moves through the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
NASA sees formation of northwestern Pacific's Tropical Depression 18W
NASA's Aqua satellite caught the birth of the 18th tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Southern Ocean sampling reveals travels of marine microbes
By collecting water samples up to six kilometers below the surface of the Southern Ocean, UNSW researchers have shown for the first time the impact of ocean currents on the distribution and abundance of marine micro-organisms. Twenty-five samples were collected across a 3,000 kilometer stretch of ocean and genetic sequencing of the microbial DNA in each sample was carried out. The research, published in Nature Communications, shows that microbial communities that are connected by ocean currents are more similar to each other.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-293-857-307
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
PLOS ONE
Study suggests overfishing of sharks is harming coral reefs
A team of scientists from Canada and Australia have discovered that the decline in shark populations is detrimental to coral reefs. "Where shark numbers are reduced due to commercial fishing, there is also a decrease in the herbivorous fishes which play a key role in promoting reef health," said Jonathan Ruppert, a recent University of Toronto PhD graduate.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Woodside Energy of Perth, Australia

Contact: Kim Luke
kim.luke@utoronto.ca
416-978-4352
University of Toronto

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Nature
Undersea mountains provide crucial piece in climate prediction puzzle
A mystery in the ocean near Antarctica has been solved by researchers who have long puzzled over how deep and mid-depth ocean waters are mixed. They found that sea water mixes dramatically as it rushes over undersea mountains in Drake Passage -- the channel between the southern tip of South America and the Antarctic continent. Mixing of water layers in the oceans is crucial in regulating the Earth's climate and ocean currents.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation, Royal Society

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-078-273-09332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans
Algorithm finds missing phytoplankton in Southern Ocean
NASA satellites may have missed more than 50 percent of the phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. But now, new research published in the Journal of Geophysical Research has led to the development of an algorithm that produces substantially more accurate estimates of Southern Ocean phytoplankton populations.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
041-861-7366
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
NASA spots wide band of strong thunderstorms south of Tropical Storm Usagi's center
Infrared data provides a look at cloud top temperatures in tropical cyclones and there were very cold cloud tops in the thunderstorms banding around the south of newborn Tropical Storm Usagi's Center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
Journal of Climate
Stronger winds explain puzzling growth of sea ice in Antarctica
Despite warming temperatures, Antarctic sea ice is on track to hit a record high. A modeling study shows strengthening polar winds are causing the increase of Southern Hemisphere sea ice.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Extinction and overfishing threats can be predicted decades before population declines
A new UC Santa Barbara study shows that threats created by overfishing can be identified decades before the fish species at risk experience high overly harvest rates and subsequent population declines. Researchers developed an Eventual Threat Index that quantifies the biological and socioeconomic conditions that eventually cause some fish species to be harvested at unsustainable rates. The findings are published in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Tropical Storm Manuel's amazing rainfall
Tropical Storm Manuel dropped very heavy rains that caused floods and mudslides and took lives on Mexico's Pacific coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite animation gives flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's heavy rains
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM can compile the rain in which rain is falling as it orbits from space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite and HS3 mission checking out Tropical Storm Humberto
NASA's TRMM satellite watched Tropical Storm Humberto's rainfall pick up over two days as it re-formed, and as part of NASA's HS3 mission, two of NASA's Global Hawk unmanned aircraft have been investigating the zombie storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2013
Online citizen scientists: Classify plankton images
Today, an online citizen-science project "Plankton Portal" launches, created by University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences researchers with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation and developers at Zooniverse.org. Plankton Portal allows you to explore the open ocean from the comfort of your own home. Dive hundreds of feet deep, and observe the unperturbed ocean and the myriad animals that inhabit the earth's last frontier.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, Bellamare LLC

Contact: Alexandra Bassil
a.bassil@miami.edu
305-284-1092
University of Miami

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Establishing world-class coral reef ecosystem monitoring in Okinawa
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researchers, working in partnership with the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, have developed the Ocean Cube Observatory System, a marine observatory system installed in waters off Motobu Peninsula, Japan -- a biodiversity hotspot that is home to ecologically significant coral reefs. The system enables real-time monitoring of temperature, salinity, and other chemical, biological and physical data.
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Contact: WHOI Media Relations
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
NASA to investigate Tropical Storm Humberto: Atlantic's second 'zombie tropical storm'
Humberto is the second "zombie" tropical storm of the Atlantic Ocean season.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1286.

<< < 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 > >>


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