Press Releases

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Showing releases 1076-1100 out of 1539.

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Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
NASA sees the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season awaken
The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season has formed over 300 miles from Diego Garcia. When NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Adjali the VIIRS instrument aboard took a visible picture of the storm that showed bands of thunderstorms wrapped around its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Worldwide ship traffic up 300 percent since 1992
New satellite data reveal a whopping boost in shipping.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Tiny fish provides giant insight into how organisms adapt to changing environment
An Indiana University-Dartmouth College team has identified genes and regulatory patterns that allow some organisms to alter their body form in response to environmental change.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Hanchett
jimhanch@indiana.edu
812-856-5490
Indiana University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Evolutionary constraints revealed in diversity of fish skulls
In the aquatic environment, suction feeding is far more common than biting as a way to capture prey. A new study shows that the evolution of biting behavior in eels led to a remarkable diversification of skull shapes, indicating that the skull shapes of most fish are limited by the structural requirements for suction feeding.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Densovirus named top suspect in devastating sea star wasting disease
Since 2013, millions of sea stars native to the Pacific coast of North America from Baja California to southern Alaska have succumbed to a mysterious wasting disease in which their limbs pull away from their bodies and their organs exude through their skin; a disease researchers say could trigger an unprecedented ecological upheaval under the waves.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Extinction risk not the answer for reef futures
Leading coral reef scientists in Australia and the USA say there needs to be a new approach to protecting the future of marine ecosystems, with a shift away from the current focus on extinction threat.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Warmest oceans ever recorded
This summer has seen the highest global mean sea surface temperatures ever recorded. Temperatures even exceed those of the record-breaking 1998 El Nino year.
International Pacific Research Center

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Ocean carbon uptake more variable than thought
The Earth's oceans are thought to have taken up about one quarter of the carbon dioxide that humans pumped into the atmosphere in the past two decades. While this drives acidification and has consequences for sea life, it also moderates the rate of climate change.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Oryx
Combatting illegal fishing in offshore marine reserves
Conservation scientists say there needs to be a new approach to protecting offshore marine reserves. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, who are attending the conference, have found a way to predict illegal fishing activities to help authorities better protect marine reserves.

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
Linking diet to human and environmental health
The world is gaining weight and becoming less healthy, and global dietary choices are harming the environment.

Contact: James Badham
james@bren.ucbs.edu
805-893-5049
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
Stock market models help NYU researchers predict animal behavior
Modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market has been discovered to predict aspects of animal behavior. The movement of zebrafish when mapped is very similar to the stochastic jump process, a mathematical model used by financial engineers. The model could improve the effectiveness of experiments, minimize the number of fish used, and allow researchers to make better use of their data following experiments.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
UT Arlington team says non-genetic changes can help parents or offspring, not both
A new study from The University of Texas at Arlington challenges current theory about how an organism changes physical characteristics because of its environment.

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans
The oceans' sensitive skin
Ocean acidification might alter climate-relevant functions of the oceans' uppermost layer, according to a study by a group of marine scientists published in the 'Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans.' In an experiment led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the researchers observed a close coupling between biological processes in the seawater and the chemistry of the sea surface microlayer.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough shows how the 'termites of the sea' digest wood
An international research team led by Dan Distel, director of the Ocean Genome Legacy at Northeastern University, has discovered a novel digestive strategy in a wood-boring clam. The breakthrough, the researchers say, may also be a game-changer for the industrial production of clean biofuels.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
We are not alone
New work by Andrea Jani and Cherie Briggs addresses a fundamental gap in disease ecology and microbiome research.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
NASA sees System 05B fizzle in Bay of Bengal
System 05B degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on Nov. 8 and lingered near the east-central coast of India for two days before dissipating on Nov. 10.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Robotic ocean gliders aid study of melting polar ice
Caltech researchers use robotic ocean gliders to study how warm water is making its way to Antarctic ice sheets -- and how this warming ultimately leads to rising ocean levels.
National Science Foundation, NERC/Antarctic Funding Initiative, Caltech President's and Director's Fund

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
GSA Bulletin
Kīlauea, 1790 and today
Scores of people were killed by an explosive eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, in 1790. Research presented in GSA Bulletin by D.A. Swanson of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and colleagues suggests that most of the fatalities were caused by hot, rapidly moving surges of volcanic debris and steam that engulfed the victims. Deposits of such surges occur on the surface on the west summit area and cover an ash bed indented with human footprints.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
The Plant Cell
Biochemistry detective work: Algae at night
In low-oxygen conditions, some organisms such as the single-cell alga Chlamydomonas are able to generate cellular energy from the breakdown of sugars without taking up oxygen. They do this using a variety of fermentation pathways, similar to those used by yeast to create alcohol. Although critical to the survival of organisms that are found all over the planet, many of the details regarding this low-oxygen energy creation process were poorly understood.

Contact: Arthur Grossman
agrossman@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Marine Chemistry
New global maps detail human-caused ocean acidification
A team of scientists has published the most comprehensive picture yet of how acidity levels vary across the world's oceans, providing a benchmark for years to come as enormous amounts of human-caused carbon emissions continue to wind up at sea. The maps are published in the journal Marine Chemistry.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kimlynnmartineau@gmail.com
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
FAPESP Week California
FAPESP Week California to discuss Brazil-USA scientific research cooperation
FAPESP Week California will take place at California's UC Berkeley and UC Davis, Nov. 17 - 21, 2014. Brazilian and US researchers will present research findings and discuss topics related to health, advanced materials, climate, economics and society. The seminar is sponsored by the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), with support from the Brazil Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, DC.

Contact: Fernando Cunha
cunha@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4151
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Termite of the sea's wood destruction strategy revealed
Shipworms, known as 'termites of the sea,' have vexed mariners and seagoing vessels for centuries. A recent study involving scientists from the Ocean Genome Legacy Center of New England Biolabs at Northeastern University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and other institutions has focused on the shipworm Bankia setacea to learn more about the enzymes it utilizes to break down wood for nutrition, information that may prove useful for the generation of biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Iron fertilization less efficient for deep-sea CO2 storage than previously thought?
Ian Salter from the Alfred Wegener Institute and a team of international collaborators discovered that iron fertilization promotes the growth of shelled organisms. In a naturally iron-fertilized system in the Southern Ocean the growth and sinking of these phytoplankton grazers reduces CO2 deep-ocean storage by up to 30 percent. Ignoring this response could result in overestimating the marine CO2 storage capacity resulting from iron fertilization. The study is published by Nature Geoscience.

Contact: Kristina Baer
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12239
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 7-Nov-2014
NASA eyes Post-Tropical Storm Nuri's winds, now to affect Alaska
NASA's newest Earth observing mission, the International Space Station-Rapid Scatterometer, or ISS-RapidScat provided a look at the winds within post-tropical cyclone Nuri on Nov. 5 and 6 as it moved parallel to Japan. Nuri has moved across the Pacific and is expected to bring hurricane-force wind gusts to Alaska's Aleutian Islands today, Nov. 7.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Nov-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 05B headed to India
Tropical Cyclone 05B was meandering in the Bay of Bengal on Nov. 8, but forecasters expect it to move west and head toward east-central India for landfall. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the tropical storm off India's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1076-1100 out of 1539.

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