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Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1285.

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Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Current Biology
Study sheds light on genetics of how and why fish swim in schools
How and why fish swim in schools has long fascinated biologists looking for clues to understand the complexities of social behavior. A new study by a team of researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center may help provide some insight.
NIH/Center of Excellence in Genomic Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Deborah Bach
media@fhcrc.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
PLOS ONE
Study provides insights on protecting world's poor from climate change
The worst impacts of climate change on the world's poorest fishing communities can likely be avoided by careful management of the local environment and investing in the diversification of options for local people, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and James Cook University.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
ACS Chemical Biology
The eyes have it
Methylmercury compounds specifically target the central nervous system, and among the many effects of their exposure are visual disturbances, which were previously thought to be solely due to methylmercury-induced damage to the brain visual cortex. However, after combining powerful synchrotron X-rays and methylmercury-poisoned zebrafish larvae, scientists have found that methylmercury may also directly affect vision by accumulating in the retinal photoreceptors, i.e., the cells that respond to light in our eyes.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Mark Ferguson
mark.ferguson@lightsource.ca
306-657-3739
Canadian Light Source, Inc.

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
2 NASA satellites analyze Hurricane Humberto's clouds and rainfall
Two NASA satellites passed over the hurricane in the Eastern Atlantic on Sept. 10 gathering information about the environment of Hurricane Humberto.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Researchers move endangered mussels to save them
Researchers at the University of Illinois have transported two endangered freshwater mussel species from Pennsylvania to Illinois in an attempt to re-establish their populations in the western part of the Ohio River Basin.

Contact: Chelsey B. Coombs
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
NASA 3-D image clearly shows wind shear's effect on Tropical Storm Gabrielle
Data obtained from NASA's TRMM satellite was used to create a 3-D image of Tropical Storm Gabrielle's rainfall that clearly showed wind shear pushed all of the storm's the rainfall east of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
U-M Water Center awards $2.9M for 8 Great Lakes restoration projects
The University of Michigan Water Center has awarded eight research grants, totaling nearly $2.9 million, to support Great Lakes restoration and protection efforts.

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Nature Geoscience
Global warming could change strength of El Niņo
Global warming could impact the El Niņo Southern Oscillation, altering the cycles of El Niņo and La Niņa events that bring extreme drought and flooding to Australia and many other Pacific-rim countries.

Contact: Alvin Stone
alvin.stone@unsw.edu.au
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Biological Invasions
Tiny number of Asian carp could be big problem for the Great Lakes
A tiny number of Asian carp could establish a population of the invasive fish in the Great Lakes, according to new research from the University of Waterloo.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4451
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
PLOS ONE
Pacific humpback whale abundance higher in British Columbia
Humpback whale populations are on the rise in the coastal fjords of British Columbia, doubling in size from 2004 to 2011.
See Financial Disclosure

Contact: Kallie Huss
onepress@plos.org
415-568-3162
PLOS

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Why are some corals flourishing in a time of global warming?
As Earth's temperature climbs, the stony corals that form the backbone of ocean reefs are in decline. It's a well-documented story: Violent storms and coral bleaching have all contributed to dwindling populations. Less discussed, however, is the plight of gorgonian corals -- softer, flexible, tree-like species. Divers have noted in recent years that gorgonian corals seem to be proliferating in certain areas of the Caribbean, and a new study will look to quantify this phenomenon.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Charlotte Hsu
chsu22@buffalo.edu
716-645-4655
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Geology
Opportunistic bivalves, high-flying diatoms, mirror-like faults, and petit-spot volcanism
New Geology studies posted online ahead of print on Sept. 6, 2013, cover faulting and strain; mineralogy; tsunamigenic earthquakes; the formation of banded iron formations by microbial processes; stalagmites in Vanuatu; garnets; the world's largest saltpan complex and one of the world's largest inland deltas; estuaries beneath ice sheets; volcanism; erosion; mirror-like faults; the Baltic Sea dead zone; and the first real-time record of a turbidity current associated with the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki tsunami.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Gabrielle resurrected in the Atlantic, Global Hawk to investigate
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the resurrected Tropical Storm Gabrielle in the Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 10, 2013, and captured infrared data.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
NASA sees heavy rainfall in strengthening Tropical Storm Humberto
NASA's TRMM satellite saw heavy rain falling south of Tropical Storm Humberto's center as it continues to strengthen in the Eastern Atlantic.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Micro-gels from tiny ice algae play an important role in polar ocean carbon budgets
Secretion of polysaccharides from the micro community living within the sea ice stick organism together and forms greater particles introducing a rapid transport of carbon to the seafloor. New research now makes it possible to forecast the importance for the global carbon budget of this transport.

Contact: David Thomas
david.thomas@biology.au.dk
45-29-65-31-17
Aarhus University

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Diversity and Distributions
Life found in the sediments of an Antarctic subglacial lake for the first time
Evidence of diverse life forms dating back nearly a hundred thousand years has been found in subglacial lake sediments by a group of British scientists. The possibility that extreme life forms might exist in the cold and dark lakes hidden kilometers beneath the Antarctic ice sheet has fascinated scientists for decades.

Contact: Paul B Holland
paul.b.holland@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21226
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
Breaking deep-sea waves reveal mechanism for global ocean mixing
Oceanographers for the first time recorded an enormous wave breaking miles below the surface in a key bottleneck for global ocean circulation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
Geology
Rainfall in South Pacific was more variable before 20th century
A new reconstruction of climate in the South Pacific during the past 446 years shows rainfall varied much more dramatically before the start of the 20th century than after. The finding, based on an analysis of a cave formation called a stalagmite from the island nation of Vanuatu, could force climate modelers to adjust their models.
National Science Foundation, Taiwan National Science Council

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@jsg.utexas.edu
512-471-2241
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
NASA investigates Gabrielle's remnants and new Tropical Storm Humberto
Tropical Depression Nine formed yesterday, Sept. 8 in the far eastern Atlantic, and NASA's Aqua satellite saw it strengthen into Tropical Storm Humberto today, Sept. 9 at 5 a.m. EDT.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Sep-2013
Nature Climate Change
Climate change will upset vital ocean chemical cycles
New research from the University of East Anglia shows that rising ocean temperatures will upset natural cycles of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorous. Plankton plays an important role in the ocean's carbon cycle by removing half of all CO2 from the atmosphere during photosynthesis and storing it deep under the sea. Findings published today in Nature Climate Change reveal that water temperature has a direct impact on maintaining the delicate plankton ecosystem of our oceans.

Contact: Lisa Horton
press@uea.ac.uk
01-603-593-496
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
Satellite sees Atlantic Tropical Depression 8 form in southwestern Gulf of Mexico
The eighth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico at 2 p.m. EDT on Sept. 6, and NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
NASA satellites and HS3 Mission cover Tropical Storm Gabrielle's demise, watch other areas
Two NASA satellites and one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft got good looks at Gabrielle when it weakened from a tropical storm to a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Lorena bringing heavy rains to Mexico's west coast
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM passed over Tropical Storm Lorena from its orbit in space on Friday, Sept. 6 and measured the rate in which rain is falling from the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Ecology
UF: Newly discovered tiger shark migration pattern might explain attacks near Hawaii
The migration of mature female tiger sharks during late summer and fall to the main Hawaiian Islands, presumably to give birth, could provide insight into attacks in that area, according to a University of Florida scientist.
Monterey Bay Aquarium, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Yannis Papastamatiou
ypapastamatiou@gmail.com
352-392-2360
University of Florida

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Sept. 5, 2013 update 2 -- satellite data shows a very active tropical Atlantic, Gabrielle weakens
Tropical Storm Gabrielle has weakened to a depression by 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 5, while three other low pressure areas struggle to develop in the Northern Atlantic Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1285.

<< < 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 > >>


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