Press Releases

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Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1738.

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Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Animals' infections can impact most on relatives, study finds
Disease in wild animals can have a greater impact on the health of others than on the infected animals themselves, a study suggests.
Natural Environment Research Council, Royal Society

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Biology Letters
Fishing ban rescues Robben Island penguin chicks
Survival of endangered African penguin chicks increased by 18 percent following a trial three-year fishery closure around Robben Island in South Africa, a new study from the University of Exeter has found.
Earthwatch Institute, Bristol Zoological Society, Leiden Conservation Foundation, National Research Foundation

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Mass extinction event from South Africa's Karoo
An international team led by researchers from the Evolutionary Studies Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has obtained an age from rocks of the Great Karoo that shed light on the timing of a mass extinction event that occurred around 260 million years ago.

Contact: Erna van Wyk
erna.vanwyk@wits.ac.za
27-117-174-023
University of the Witwatersrand

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Everything you need to know about coastal engineering -- international compendium published
Coastal and ocean engineers can now look forward to new research reading material compiled in a single compendium. Published by World Scientific, the 'International Compendium of Coastal Engineering' aims to provide a comprehensive overview of coastal engineering from basic theory to engineering practice.

Contact: Jason CJ
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NASA sees Nangka become a typhoon
Tropical Storm Nangka strengthened to a typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean just after NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on July 6.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NASA's infrared look at strengthening Typhoon Chan-Hom
During the early morning hours on July 6, Chan-Hom was a strong tropical storm. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very powerful thunderstorms that hinted at intensification, and later in the day, Chan-Hom became a typhoon.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Tel Aviv/Tsinghua University project uses crowd computing to improve water filtration
A joint research project by Tel Aviv University and Tsinghua University proposes a novel nanotechnology-based strategy to improve water filtration. The project, initiated by IBM's World Community Grid, was an experiment in crowdsourced computing -- carried out by over 150,000 volunteers who contributed their own computing power to the research.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Linfa exiting northern Philippines
Tropical Storm Linfa moved over Luzon in the northern Philippines over July 4 and by early July 5, NASA's Aqua satellite saw the storm moving into the South China Sea.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Science
Seahorse tails could inspire new generation of robots
Inspiration for the next big technological breakthrough in robotics, defense systems and biomedicine could come from a seahorse's tail, according to a new study reported Thursday in the journal Science. The research centers on the curious shape of seahorse tails and was led by Clemson University's Michael M. Porter, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

Contact: Michael Porter
mmporte@clemson.edu
864-656-1307
Clemson University

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Depression 10W's most powerful storms
Infrared date from NASA's Aqua satellite spotted the strongest storms within newborn Tropical Depression 10W over the Philippine Sea today, July 2.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
NASA sees 2 tropical cyclones on either side of the equator
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over two tropical cyclones in the Pacific Ocean on different sides of the equator today, July 2.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Deep Sea Research II
The very hungry sea anemone
The surprising culinary preferences of an abyssal sea anemone have been unveiled by a team of scientists from the National Oceanography Centre. New time-lapse photography of the abyssal sea floor shows that this type of anemone can eat animals up to six times its weight and moves around the ocean floor by burrowing. The lead author of this study, Jennifer Durden, a Ph.D. student at the NOC, explained that these heavy meals can take the anemone up to 80 hours to digest.
Natural Environmental Research Council

Contact: Holly Peacock
holly.peacock@noc.ac.uk
0238-059-6388
National Oceanography Centre, UK

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
ZooKeys
Hard soft coral: New genus and species of 'living fossil' octocoral related to blue coral
A new species and genus of octocoral (Cnidaria Anthozoa) was described from Zamami Island Okinawa Japan, Nanipora kamurai. Molecular phylogenetic analyses showed that the species is closely related to genus Heliopora, and can be considered a 'living fossil.' The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Dr. James D. Reimer
jreimer@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp
81-988-958-542
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Southampton researchers go with the flow to help protect endangered European eel
New research led by the University of Southampton is paving the way to protect the endangered European eel as they migrate through rivers to the ocean.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Science
Fish will have to find new habitats or perish if global warming is left unchecked
Climate change is forcing fish out of their current habitats and into cooler waters and many more species will soon be affected if climate goals are not met, say scientists.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Science
Why the seahorse's tail is square
Why is the seahorse's tail square? An international team of researchers has found the answer and it could lead to building better robots and medical devices. In a nutshell, a tail made of square, overlapping segments makes for better armor than a cylindrical tail. It's also better at gripping and grasping. Researchers describe their findings in the July 3 issue of Science.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, Belgian Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology, Oregon State University, Clemson University

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@eng.ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2015
Will climate change put mussels off the menu?
Fans of moules marinière may soon find themselves out of luck according to research which suggests that global warming may threaten shellfish industries.
Swedish Research Council, Swedish International Development Cooperation, Gothenburg Centre for Marine Research, University of Gothenburg, College of Fisheries Mangalore, Nitte University

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Unraveling iridescence
Perhaps not the brightest of cephalopods, the California market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) has amazing light-manipulating abilities.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
NASA sees heavy rain in Tropical Cyclone Chan-Hom
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Chan-Hom and found heavy rainfall in the newborn storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
Tropical Cyclone Raquel triggers warnings in Solomon Islands
NASA's Terra satellite and RapidScat instrument showed a slowly developing Tropical Storm Raquel affecting the Solomon Islands on June 30 and July 1.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Charcoaling manure and greening neighborhoods in the Chesapeake Bay watershed
Chesapeake Bay bears a heavy pollution burden from the growing metropolitan centers and vibrant agricultural activity in the watershed. When ecologists gather in Baltimore, Md., this August for the 100th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, special attention will fall on the local Chesapeake Bay watershed, with field trips and research presentations exploring its rich wildlife and social history.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
Society for Experimental Biology 2015
Baby seals that practice in pools make better divers
Being able to dive is what matters most for seal pups, but how do they learn to do it? Grey seal pups that can play in pools may have better diving skills once they make the move to the sea, and this could increase their chance of survival. Researchers at Plymouth University have found that spending time in pools of water helps seal pups hold their breath for longer.

Contact: Anthea Lacchia
lacchiaa@tcd.ie
353-872-594-945
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Monitoring seawater reveals ocean acidification risks to Alaskan shellfish hatchery
New collaborative research between NOAA, University of Alaska and an Alaskan shellfish hatchery shows that ocean acidification may make it difficult for Alaskan coastal waters to support shellfish hatcheries by 2040 unless costly mitigation efforts are installed to modify seawater used in the hatcheries.

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
301-734-1123
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
Nature
Single-celled predator evolves tiny, human-like 'eye'
A single-celled marine plankton evolved a miniature version of a multi-cellular eye, possibly to help see its prey better, according to University of British Columbia research published today in Nature.

Contact: Brian Leander
bleander@mail.ubc.ca
778-229-0239
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
PLOS ONE
Hydroelectric dams drastically reduce tropical forest biodiversity
Widely hailed as 'green' sources of renewable energy, hydroelectric dams have been built worldwide at an unprecedented scale. But University of East Anglia research reveals that these major infrastructure projects are far from environmentally friendly. A PLOS ONE study reveals the drastic effects of the major Amazonian Balbina Dam on tropical rainforest biodiversity. It reveals a loss of mammals, birds and tortoises from the vast majority of islands formed by the creation of the Balbina Lake.
Wildlife Conservation Society, Natural Environment Research Council, The Rufford Small Grant Foundation, Conservation Food and Health Foundation, Idea Wild, Amazon Region Protected Areas

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1738.

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