Press Releases

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Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1677.

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Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, Titan's atmosphere
This week from AGU: articles on undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, and Titan's atmosphere.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
DNA of bacteria crucial to ecosystem defies explanation
The genome of an important bacteria contains far more 'junk DNA' than scientists expected -- making its genome more closely resemble that of a higher lifeform.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
University of Southern California

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
UNH researchers discover new method to detect most common bacteria contaminating oysters
In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and sickened consumers who ate the contaminated shellfish. The new patent-pending detection method - which is available for immediate use to identify contaminated shellfish -- is a significant advance in efforts to identify shellfish harboring disease-carrying strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, US Department of Agriculture, NH Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation EPSCoR

Contact: Lori Wright
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil
A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. In May 2014, a group of recreational divers spotted an adult lionfish -- the voracious invader Pterois volitans -- in the rocky reefs of southeastern Brazil.

Contact: Haley Bowling
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Majorities in Arctic nations favor cooperation with Russia despite Ukraine; conflict worries rise
Commissioned by the Gordon Foundation of Toronto and Institute of the North, Anchorage, a survey of 10,000 respondents in countries with Arctic territory reveals major differences of opinion on issues ranging from Arctic co-operation with Russia to the threat of military conflict north of the 60th parallel, to whether the Northwest Passage is a Canadian or international waterway. Tables of the survey results are here:
The Gordon Foundation / Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program, Institute of the North

Contact: Terry Collins
The Gordon Foundation

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Calculating how the Pacific was settled
Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, a University of Utah anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
University of Utah

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef
New research shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish populations of the Great Barrier Reef. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that removing predatory fish such as coral trout and snapper, through fishing, causes significant changes to the make-up of the reef's fish populations.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phytoplankton, reducing greenhouse gases or amplifying Arctic warming?
Scientists with Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, and Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, presented on Monday, April 20, in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences online, the geophysical impact of phytoplankton that triggers positive feedback in the Arctic warming when the warming-induced melting of sea ice stimulates phytoplankton growth. The paper is titled 'Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.'
Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of Korea, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Ms. YunMee Jung
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Extending climate predictability beyond El Niño
Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists from the USA, Australia, and Japan. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers.

Contact: Gisela Speidel
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Deep Sea Research II - Topical Studies in Oceanography
Let it snow
Before Deepwater Horizon, scientists didn't know that oil and marine snow had anything to do with each other.

Contact: Julie Cohen
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Geoscience
Ocean currents impact methane consumption
Offshore the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago, methane is seeping out of the seabed in several hundred meters depth. Luckily, bacteria are consuming a large proportion of the methane before it is released to the atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. An interdisciplinary study conducted by researchers at the University of Basel and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel could now show that ocean currents can have a strong impact on methane removal. The renowned journal Nature Geoscience has published the study.

Contact: Jan Steffen
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
PLOS Biology
Pruning of blood vessels: Cells can fuse with themselves
Cells of the vascular system of vertebrates can fuse with themselves. This process, which occurs when a blood vessel is no longer necessary and pruned, has now been described on the cellular level by Professor Markus Affolter from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. The findings of this study have been published in the journal PLOS Biology.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
University of Basel

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Vampire squid discovery shows how little we know of the deep sea
Among soft-bodied cephalopods, vampire squid live life at a slower pace. At ocean depths from 500 to 3,000 meters, they don't swim so much as float, and they get by with little oxygen while consuming a low-calorie diet of zooplankton and detritus. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 20 have found that vampire squid differ from all other living coleoid cephalopods in their reproductive strategy as well.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
Cell Press

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Great Lakes Research
Model offers more ease, precision for managing invasive Asian carp
The likelihood of Asian carp eggs being kept in suspension and hatching in the St. Joseph River in Michigan has been further evaluated using a model that examines a range of multiple flow and water temperature scenarios. Results illustrate the highest percentage of Asian carp eggs at risk of hatching occurs when the streamflow is low and when the water temperature is high.

Contact: Jennifer LaVista
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fish type, body size can help predict nutrient recycling rates
The nutrients excreted by fish in their 'pee' may be critical to the health of coastal ecosystems. But knowing whether generalizations can be made about how to predict these nutrient levels in various ecosystems has vexed researchers -- until now.
National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Mick Kulikowski
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
GPM sees wind shear affecting remnants of Extra-tropical Cyclone Joalane
The GPM satellite showed the effects of wind shear and waning rainfall rates in Extra-tropical Cyclone Joalane as it was moving in a southeasterly direction through the Southern Indian Ocean.

Contact: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
New tool to connect geoscience information to decision makers
The Critical Issues Research Database seeks to connect end-users to the wealth of information available on issues at the intersection of geoscience and society such as the occurrence of natural resources, hazard mitigation and pollution risks.

Contact: Leila Gonzales
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Repeated marine predator evolution tracks changes in ancient and Anthropocene oceans
A team of Smithsonian scientists synthesized decades of scientific discoveries to illuminate the common and unique patterns driving the extraordinary transitions that whales, dolphins, seals and other species underwent as they moved from land to sea. Drawing on recent breakthroughs in diverse fields such as paleontology, molecular biology and conservation ecology, their findings offer a comprehensive look at how life in the ocean has responded to environmental change from the Triassic to the Anthropocene.
Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Katie Sabella

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Current Biology
Video: Octopuses have unique way to control their 'odd' forms
The body plan of octopuses is nothing if not unique, with a sophisticated brain in a soft, bilaterally symmetrical body, encircled by eight radially symmetrical and incredibly flexible arms. Now, researchers reporting the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling show that the animals have a unique motor control strategy to match their 'odd' form. The researchers report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 16.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Study will parse evolutionary shift between life in water and on land
University of Kansas researcher Andrew Short will analyze South American water scavenger beetles' transition between aquatic and terrestrial living -- and in the process learn more about the mechanics of evolution itself.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M Lynch
University of Kansas

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Longest mammal migration raises questions about distinct species
A team of scientists from the United States and Russia has documented the longest migration of a mammal ever recorded -- a round-trip trek of nearly 14,000 miles by a whale identified as a critically endangered species that raises questions about its status as a distinct species.
US Office of Naval Research, Exxon Neftegas Limited

Contact: Bruce Mate
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Royal Society Open Science
Research details 40 million-year-old family tree of baleen whales
New research from New Zealand's University of Otago is providing the most comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of baleen whales, which are not only the largest animals ever to live on earth, but also among the most unusual.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, The Geoscience Society of New Zealand, The Scottish Association for Marine Science, The Systematic Association/Linnean Society of London, The Paleontological Society

Contact: Felix Mars
University of Otago

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Climate connections
Global climate has undergone periods of stability, but also instability, with abrupt, rapid and substantial climate changes occurring as a consequence of natural processes scientists still don't understand. University of South Carolina paleoceanographer Kelly Gibson contributed to the field in a recent paper, which demonstrates the influence of rapid climate change on marine ecosystems near Venezuela tens of thousands of years ago and shows how changes there were accompanied by simultaneous changes globally.

Contact: Steven Powell
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
The life force of African rivers
A new study shows the ecological importance of hippopotamus-vectored subsidies.

Contact: Julie Cohen
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Seeing the unseen: PET/CT scans reveal worms' hidden life
What are lugworms and other small animals doing in the seabed? Until now scientists have not been able to study these animals without disturbing them, but thanks to modern PET/CT scans, now we can study their hidden life.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
University of Southern Denmark

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1677.

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