Press Releases

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Showing releases 1151-1175 out of 1742.

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Public Release: 27-Aug-2015
Current Biology
Data backs limits on deep-sea fishing by depth
Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Aug. 27 have evidence in support of a clearly defined depth limit for deep-sea fishing in Europe. The findings come just as the European Union considers controversial new legislation to manage deep-sea fisheries, including a ban on trawling below 600 meters.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Mars' ice, Earth's mantle & 5 new research papers
Just beneath Mars' dirt surface, or regolith, researchers found an enormous slab of water ice, measuring 40 meters (130 feet) thick, and covering an area equivalent to that of California and Texas combined, according to a new study published today in Geophysical Research Letters.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
DNA sequencing used to identify thousands of fish eggs
Using DNA sequencing, researchers have accurately painted a clear picture of fish spawning activities in a marine protected area and have created a baseline for continuing studies on the effects of climate variability on fish populations. Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers collected 260 samples off the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier over a two-year period and used DNA barcoding to accurately identify over 13,000 fish eggs.
California Sea Grant, Richard Grand Foundation

Contact: Christina Wu or Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lab experiments question popular measure of ancient ocean temperatures
The membranes of sediment-entombed archaea are an increasingly popular way to determine ocean surface temperatures back to the age of the dinosaurs. But new results show that changing oxygen can affect the reading by as much as 21 degrees C.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
NASA sees Tropical Storm Erika approaching the Lesser Antilles
As Tropical Storm Ericka continued moving toward the Lesser Antilles, NASA's Aqua and other satellites were gathering data.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
NASA's GPM satellite sees heavy rain around Loke's center
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite can measure rainfall from space, and saw heavy rainfall in the Central Pacific's Loke when it was a hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
ZooKeys
Sir Elton John is the inspiration behind the name of a new coral reef crustacean species
An American coral reef scientist found a small shrimp-like crustacean with a greatly enlarged appendage reminiscent of the Elton John character in the movie 'Tommy.' Discovered while working in the remote coral reefs of Raja Ampat, Indonesia, Dr. Thomas said about the species: 'When I first saw this amazing amphipod I immediately thought of Elton John as the Pinball Wizard in the movie.' The study is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Dr. James Thomas
thomasjd@nova.edu
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
NASA measures rainfall in stronger Tropical Storm Ignacio
The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite measured rainfall as Tropical Depression Twelve was upgraded to Tropical Storm Ignacio.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
Marine Pollution Bulletin
Research demonstrates millions of plastic particles exist in cosmetic products
Everyday cosmetic and cleaning products contain huge quantities of plastic particles, which are released to the environment and could be harmful to marine life, according to a new study by Plymouth University.

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
01-752-588-004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Atsani bow out
Tropical Cyclone Atsani appeared to look more like a frontal system in infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NOAA's new Climate Science Strategy outlines efforts to build resilience
As ocean conditions continue to change, putting ocean ecosystems and the communities that rely upon them at risk, today, NOAA took a first step in providing regional fisheries managers and stakeholders with information they need to reduce the effects of climate change and build resilience.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8013
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in 3 decades
In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers one of the world's rarest animals, a remote encounter that may become even more infrequent if illegal fishing practices continue.
National Geographic Society, Tiffany & Co. Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Nature
Debut of the global mix-master
The Atlantic Circumpolar Current encircles Antarctica with a constant eastward flow in the Southern Ocean. Researchers determined that it originated 30 million years ago, several million years after the tectonic opening of a deep-water channel in the Tasmanian gateway. The Tasmanian gateway was initially the conduit for westward current flow, but as the gateway migrated north tectonically, it eventually aligned with the mid-latitude westerly winds and effected the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Erika inside and outside
NASA's GPM and NOAA's GOES satellite provided views at the newborn Atlantic storm's rainfall and cloud extent.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA sees Hurricane Loke moving north
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Loke as it continued moving north in the Central Pacific early on Aug. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
GPM sees energetic Tropical Depression Kilo
Rainfall associated with Tropical Depression Kilo recently dumped heavy rain in some areas of the state of Hawaii.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA's Terra Satellite sees birth of Tropical Depression 12E
The twelfth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season was born today, Aug. 25, 2015, as NASA's Terra satellite flew overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
NASA sees Typhoon Goni cover southern half of Sea of Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Goni after it moved out of the East China Sea and north into the Sea of Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Nova Southeastern University researcher and collaborators receive $1.1 million grant
Researchers are finding the hybrid corals are more resilient than their parents, and they are studying why and if this can help aid in coral reef restoration and preservation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
ZooKeys
New Indonesian crayfish species escapes the decor market to become a freedom fighter
It might have been an unknown ornamental fish collector and dealer that captured the motley crayfish species C. snowden for the first time by the coasts of the island of New Guinea, but it was the German research team, led by Christian Lukhaup who were the first to recognize, compare, prove it as a new species and give it a name after a controversial 'American freedom fighter.' Their work is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Christian Lukhaup
craykeeper@gmx.de
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
mBio
Hepatitis A-like virus identified in seals
Scientists in the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered a new virus in seals that is the closest known relative of the human hepatitis A virus. The finding provides new clues on the emergence of hepatitis A. The research appears in the July/August issue of mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Tim Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Foes can become friends on the coral reef
On the coral reef, knowing who's your friend and who's your enemy can sometimes be a little complicated. Take seaweed, for instance. Normally it's the enemy of coral, secreting toxic chemicals, blocking the sunlight, and damaging coral with its rough surfaces. But when hordes of hungry crown-of-thorns sea stars invade the reef, everything changes, reports a study published Aug. 25 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Aug-2015
Danny the 'degenerate' followed by 2 lows
Danny has become a degenerate, that is, the tropical depression weakened. Satellite and Hurricane Hunter aircraft data showed that Danny degenerated into an elongated area of low pressure near the Windward Islands during the afternoon (local time) on Aug. 24. Meanwhile two other developing low pressure areas lie to the east of Danny.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Aug-2015
GSA Bulletin
New data changes ideas about sea level and coastal uplift along Pacific Coast
A new GSA Bulletin study shows that uplift rates across the Pacific Coast of the USA and northern Mexico have been overestimated by an average of more than 40 percent. These lower uplift rates imply that the shorelines of the West Coast are rising at a slower rate than previously thought, and this may have important implications for coastal management, including earthquake hazards and the potential impact of sea-level rise to coastlines across the Pacific Coast.

Contact: Kea Giles
keagiles@coyotesong.com
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 24-Aug-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Storm Atsani stretching out
Tropical Storm Atsani appeared elongated when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. Atsani weakened to a tropical storm on Aug. 24, 2015.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1151-1175 out of 1742.

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