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Showing releases 1151-1175 out of 1266.

<< < 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 > >>

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers discover a new way fish camouflage themselves in the ocean
Researchers found that lookdown fish camouflage themselves through a complex manipulation of polarized light after it strikes the fish skin. In laboratory studies, they showed that this kind of camouflage outperforms by up to 80 percent the "mirror" strategy that was previously thought to be state-of-the-art in fish camouflage.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Molly Cummings
mcummings@mail.utexas.edu
512-471-5163
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
ZooKeys
The jewels of the ocean: 2 new species and a new genus of octocorals from the Pacific
Two new beautiful species of octocorals and a new genus have been described from the well explored west coast of North America. Despite the 3,400 known species nowadays, these colorful marine jewels continue to surprise with new discoveries which calls for a detailed exploration of the remarkable biodiversity of octocorals. The study was published in the open access journal Zookeys.

Contact: Gary C. Williams
gwilliams@calacademy.org
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hidden effects of climate change may threaten eelgrass meadows
Some research has shown that the effects of changes in the climate may be weak or even non-existent. This makes it easy to conclude that climate change will ultimately have less impact than previous warnings have predicted. But it could also be explained as direct and indirect effects cancelling each other out, as scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, show in a paper recently published in PNAS, the esteemed US scientific journal.

Contact: Christian Alsterberg
christian.alsterberg@bioenv.gu.se
46-031-786-6596
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 3-Jun-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Enzyme from wood-eating gribble could help turn waste into biofuel
Robust enzyme discovery that could help lead to sustainable biofuels. Enzyme to create liquid fuel from wood could be produced in the same way that enzymes for biological washing detergents are made. First 3-D image of aquatic animal enzyme provides previously undiscovered picture of how it works.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Rob Dawson
rob.dawson@bbsrc.ac.uk
01-793-413-204
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 2-Jun-2013
Nature Geoscience
Researchers document acceleration of ocean denitrification during deglaciation
As ice sheets melted during the deglaciation of the last ice age and global oceans warmed, oceanic oxygen levels decreased and "denitrification" accelerated by 30 to 120 percent, a new international study shows, creating oxygen-poor marine regions and throwing the oceanic nitrogen cycle off balance.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andreas Schmittner
aschmittner@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-9952
Oregon State University

Public Release: 31-May-2013
NASA satellites watch the demise of Hurricane Barbara
NOAA's GOES-14 satellite captured Hurricane Barbara's landfall in southwestern Mexico and movement across land, northward toward the Gulf of Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-May-2013
PLOS ONE
Catastrophic climatic events leave corals facing a decade-long fight for recovery
Coral reefs can take more than a decade to recover from catastrophic climatic events, with some species taking up to 13 years to recolonise their original habitats, scientists have discovered.

Contact: Alan Williams
alan.williams@plymouth.ac.uk
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 31-May-2013
Plant intelligence for better swarm robots
Plants scientists are teaming up with marine biologists, medical researchers and experts in computational intelligence to produce better robot swarms able to negotiate unpredictable terrain. Robot swarms are made up of hundreds of tiny robots working together. The way plants work will provide valuable insights into how to make individual robots work for the benefit of the swarm. For example, plants are able to sprout new shoots to catch light or seek out nutrients in the soil for the whole plant.
European Union

Contact: Zoe Dunford
zoe.dunford@jic.ac.uk
07-768-164-185
Norwich BioScience Institutes

Public Release: 31-May-2013
PLOS ONE
Acidifying oceans could spell trouble for squid
Acidifying oceans could dramatically impact the world's squid species, according to a new study led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researchers and soon to be published in the journal PLOS ONE. Because squid are both ecologically and commercially important, that impact may have far-reaching effects on the ocean environment and coastal economies, the researchers report.

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 30-May-2013
Microbiologist at the Desert Research Institute makes his mark in Death Valley
Dr. Duane Moser, Environmental Microbiologist at the Desert Research Institute was recently awarded the 2013 Devils Hole Pupfish recognition for his ongoing research on the habitat of the Devils Hole pupfish.

Contact: Ashley Conroy
ashley.conroy@dri.edu
702-862-5411
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 30-May-2013
PLOS ONE
Climate change threatens extinction for 82 percent of California native fish
Of 121 native fish species in California, researchers predict 82 percent are likely to be driven to extinction or very low numbers as climate change speeds the decline of already depleted populations.
California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission Instream Flow Assessment Program

Contact: Peter Moyle
pbmoyle@ucdavis.edu
530-752-6355
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-May-2013
NASA sees Hurricane Barbara quickly weaken to a depression
Tropical Storm Barbara strengthened into a hurricane just before it made landfall late on May 29, and after landfall it weakened into a tropical depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-May-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Going home
For a better protection of marine turtles, scientists try to understand why they return to their birthplace in order to reproduce after rather long distance migrations. Using molecular tools applied to turtles from the Cape Verde islands, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (Germany) found females from different islands have different immune genes, suggesting that returning home to reproduce is linked to advantages in parasite resistance. The study is now published in the "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences."

Contact: Jan Steffen
jsteffen@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 30-May-2013
Oryx
Sharks worth more in the ocean than on the menu
Sharks are worth more in the ocean than in a bowl of soup, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia.

Contact: Andras Cisneros-Montemayor
a.cisneros@fisheries.ubc.ca
778-891-3836
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 30-May-2013
Frontiers
Frontiers news briefs May 30
In this week's news briefs: When language switching has no apparent cost; The microbial diversity within the Columbia River; and Age-related similarities and differences in brain activity underlying reversal learning.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
gozde.zorlu@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Public Release: 30-May-2013
Current Biology
How the turtles got their shells
Through careful study of an ancient ancestor of modern turtles, researchers now have a clearer picture of how the turtles' most unusual shell came to be. The findings, reported on May 30 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, help to fill a 30- to 55-million-year gap in the turtle fossil record through study of an extinct South African reptile known as Eunotosaurus.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 29-May-2013
NRL geochemistry survey at Chatham Rise reveals absence of modern day greenhouse gas emissions
Scientists from Germany, New Zealand and United States aboard the German research vessel, R/V Sonne, investigate and map giant seafloor anomalies off the New Zealand coast.

Contact: Daniel Parry
nrlpao@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 29-May-2013
Nature
Arctic current flowed under deep freeze of last ice age, study says
During the last ice age, when thick ice covered the Arctic, many scientists assumed that the deep currents below that feed the North Atlantic Ocean and help drive global ocean currents slowed or even stopped. But in a new study in Nature, researchers show that the deep Arctic Ocean has been churning briskly for the last 35,000 years, through the chill of the last ice age and warmth of modern times.
National Science Foundation, Comer Science and Education Fund

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 29-May-2013
PLOS ONE
Thermal limit for animal life redefined by first lab study of deep-sea vent worms
Forty-two may or may not be the answer to everything, but it likely defines the temperature limit where animal life thrives, according to the first laboratory study of heat-loving Pompeii worms from deep-sea vents, published May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Bruce Shillito and colleagues from the University Pierre and Marie Curie, France.

Contact: Souri Somphanith
onepress@plos.org
415-568-4546
PLOS

Public Release: 28-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists find possible solution to an ancient enigma
The widespread disappearance of stromatolites, the earliest visible manifestation of life on Earth, may have been driven by single-celled organisms called foraminifera, study finds.
National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Relations
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 28-May-2013
NASA sees developing tropical cyclone near southwestern Mexico
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of System 92E, a tropical low pressure area that is ripe for development into a tropical depression and tropical storm, as it continues to develop near to southwestern Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-May-2013
Limnology & Oceanography
Fast-sinking jellyfish could boost the oceans' uptake of carbon dioxide
Increasing numbers of gelatinous plankton might help in mitigating the CO2 problem. In field and laboratory experiments scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has shown that dead jellyfish and pelagic tunicates sink much faster than phytoplankton and marine snow remains. Jellies are especially important because they rapidly consume plankton and particles and quickly export biomass and carbon to the ocean interior.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Federal Ministry of Education and Research, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Maria Lebrato
mlebrato@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 28-May-2013
International Journal of Climatology
Study explores atmospheric impact of declining Arctic sea ice
New research explores the impact of ice free seas on the planet's atmospheric circulation.

Contact: Ben Norman
Sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
44-012-437-70375
Wiley

Public Release: 28-May-2013
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Dealing with 'crap' to improve water quality
To better understand how bacteria impact the environment a former University of California, Riverside graduate student spent nearly a year building a system that replicates a human colon, septic tank and groundwater and "fed" the colon three times a day during weeklong experiments to simulate human eating.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 28-May-2013
Archives des Sciences
Microplastic pollution prevalent in lakes too
EPFL researchers have detected microplastic pollution in one of Western Europe's largest lakes, Lake Geneva, in large enough quantities to raise concern. The study was published in the latest issue of the journal Archives des Sciences.

Contact: Jan Overney
jan.overney@epfl.ch
41-765-027-373
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Showing releases 1151-1175 out of 1266.

<< < 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 > >>


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