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Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1302.

<< < 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
CU-Boulder study shows unprecedented warmth in Arctic
Average summer temperatures in the Eastern Canadian Arctic during the last 100 years are higher now than during any century in the past 44,000 years and perhaps as long ago as 120,000 years, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gifford Miller
gmiller@colorado.edu
303-990-2071
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Early-life exposure of frogs to herbicide increases mortality from fungal disease
A new study shows the herbicide atrazine increased mortality from chytridiomycosis, a disease causing worldwide amphibian declines.
US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Vickie Chachere
vchachere@usf.edu
813-974-6251
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite shows wind shear's effect on Tropical Storm Lorenzo
NASA's TRMM satellite data provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with a good look at how wind shear is affecting Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the Atlantic Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
NASA eyes Super-typhoon Lekima in the northwestern Pacific
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Lekima after it became a super-typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured visible and infrared data on the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Raymond finally moving away from Mexico
Satellite data revealed that Raymond, formerly a hurricane, now a tropical storm is finally moving away from the coast of south-central Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans
New research illustrates Mississippi River's role
A new study led by scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed that the complex circulation from the Mississippi River plume played a substantial role in the transport and fate of the oil following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident. These findings provide new information on the transport of oil and other pollutants in the Gulf of Mexico. The research, published in the Oct. 2013 issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans.

Contact: Alexandra Bassil
a.bassil@miami.edu
305-284-1092
University of Miami

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
NASA sees heavy rain in Typhoon Francisco, now affecting southern Japanese islands
On Oct. 22, 2013 Typhoon Francisco was already affecting the southern islands Japan when the TRMM satellite had a good view of its rainfall and cloud heights.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Dolphins inspire new radar system to detect hidden surveillance and explosive devices
Inspired by the way dolphins hunt using bubble nets, scientists at the University of Southampton, in collaboration with University College London and Cobham Technical Services, have developed a new kind of radar that can detect hidden surveillance equipment and explosives.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Nature
Coral chemicals protect against warming oceans
Australian marine scientists have found the first evidence that coral itself may play an important role in regulating local climate. They have discovered that the coral animal--not just its algal symbiont--makes an important sulphur-based molecule with properties to assist it in many ways, ranging from cellular protection in times of heat stress to local climate cooling by encouraging clouds to form.

Contact: Steve Clarke
s.clarke@aims.gov.au
61-419-668-497
Science in Public

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Long-term study links box jellyfish abundance, environmental variability at Waikiki Beach
Drawing on 14 years of monthly collection data, researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa have found that the total number of box jellyfish that come ashore at Waikiki displayed no net increase or decrease, but instead followed an oscillating four-year pattern. Their abundance is likely influenced by climate fluctuations that play a role in large scale primary production in the ocean, regulating food availability and ultimately affecting the local numbers of box jellyfish.

Contact: Talia Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Name that tune
The same algorithm used to find tunes in music retrieval systems has been successfully applied in identifying the signature whistles of dolphins, affording a new time-saving device for research into the world of dolphin communication.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Typhoon Francisco approaching Japan
Typhoon Francisco was already spreading fringe clouds over southern Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite flew overhead and captured a picture of the storm from space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
NASA sees Hurricane Raymond re-soaking Mexican coast
A month ago Hurricane Manuel caused landslides and extensive flooding along Mexico's Pacific Ocean coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
NASA sees Atlantic depression become Tropical Storm Lorenzo
It took six hours for the thirteenth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season to organize and strengthen into Tropical Storm Lorenzo.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
NASA sees hint of Typhoon Lekima's rapidly intensification
Tropical Storm Lekima intensified quickly early on Oct. 22 while traveling over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Lasers offer an automated way to test drinking water
To keep drinking water clean, experts are constantly monitoring our supply to check it for contaminants. Now laser technology will give them a helping hand: a new system automatically analyzes water samples at the waterworks itself.

Contact: Dr. Frank Fuchs
frank.fuchs@iaf.fraunhofer.de
49-761-515-9354
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Tropical Storm Lekima born in northwestern Pacific Ocean
The twenty-eighth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season developed and strengthened into Tropical Storm Lekima.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
NASA sees major Hurricane Raymond lashing western Mexico
Low pressure System 96E developed quickly over the weekend of Oct. 19 and 20 and by Oct. 21 had grown into Hurricane Raymond.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
NASA satellites investigate Typhoon Francisco heading for Japan
Several of NASA's fleet of Earth-observing satellites have been gathering data on Typhoon Francisco as it moves toward Japan.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
NASA animation shows birth of 13th Atlantic tropical depression
The thirteenth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean season formed today, Oct. 21 and NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured its development.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
NSF awards grants for deployment of new observing system in the North Atlantic Ocean
In an effort to study the circulation of ocean waters, a key component of the global climate system, the National Science Foundation has awarded $16 million in grants over the next five years to oceanographers at Duke University, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of Miami.

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Journal of Experimental Biology
Seeing in the dark
The Yangtze finless porpoise, which inhabits the high-traffic waters near the Three Gorges Dam in China, is highly endangered, with only about 1,000 animals alive today. Scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and their Chinese colleagues are using medical technology to shed new light on this species' critical sense of hearing in a waterway punctuated by constant shipping, dredging, and underwater construction.

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Geoscience
Global ocean currents explain why Northern Hemisphere is the soggier one
The Northern Hemisphere gets more tropical rain because of ocean currents that originate in the icy waters near Greenland.
National Science Foundation, NASA, NOAA, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, US Department of Defense

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 18-Oct-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite monitors Typhoon Francisco
Typhoon Francisco passed west of Guam on Oct. 18 as NASA and the Japan Space Agency's TRMM satellite passed overhead and measured its heavy rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Oct-2013
Satellite sees extra-tropical Typhoon Wipha affecting Alaska
Powerful Typhoon Wipha never made landfall in the northwestern Pacific but affected several land areas there as seen by NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1302.

<< < 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 > >>


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