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Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1262.

<< < 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 > >>

Public Release: 27-May-2013
Science
The Antarctic polar icecap is 33.6 million years old
These findings, reported in the journal Science, are based on fossil records in sediment cores at different depths. The study was led by the Andalusian Institute of Earth Sciences, a Spanish National Research Council-University of Granada joint center.

Contact: Carlota Escutia
carlotaescutia@ugr.es
34-958-230-000 x19021
University of Granada

Public Release: 26-May-2013
Nature Geoscience
Climate researchers discover new rhythm for El Niño
Why El Niņo peaks around Christmas and ends quickly by February to April has been a long-standing mystery. The answer lies in an interaction between El Niņo and the annual cycle that results in an unusual tropical Pacific wind pattern with a period of 15 months, according to a team of scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Their study appears in the May 26, 2013, online issue of Nature Geoscience.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, NOAA, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 973 Program of China, China Meteorological Special Project

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Current Biology
Scientists offer first definitive proof of bacteria-feeding behavior in green algae
Researchers have captured images of green alga consuming bacteria, offering a glimpse at how early organisms dating back more than 1 billion years may have acquired free-living photosynthetic cells. This acquisition is thought to be a critical first step in the evolution of photosynthetic algae and land plants, which, in turn, contributed to the increase in oxygen levels in Earth's atmosphere and ocean and provided one of the conditions necessary for animal evolution.
American Museum of Natural History, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 23-May-2013
Scientists announce top 10 new species
An amazing glow-in-the-dark cockroach, a harp-shaped carnivorous sponge and the smallest vertebrate on Earth are just three of the newly discovered top 10 species selected by the International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University. A global committee of taxonomists -- scientists responsible for species exploration and classification -- announced its list of top 10 species from 2012 today, May 23.

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Thinking 'big' may not be best approach to saving large-river fish
Large-river specialist fishes -- from giant species like paddlefish and blue catfish, to tiny crystal darters and silver chub -- are in danger, but researchers say there is greater hope to save them if major tributaries identified in a University of Wisconsin-Madison study become a focus of conservation efforts.

Contact: Brenda Pracheil
pracheil@wisc.edu
402-613-0315
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 22-May-2013
Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Eyes on the prey
For most animal species, moving objects play a major role in the processing of sensory impressions in the brain, as they often signal the presence of a welcome prey or an imminent threat. This is also true of the zebrafish larva, which has to react to the movements of its prey. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have investigated how the brain uses the information from the visual system for the execution of quicker movements.

Contact: Johann H. Bollmann
johann.bollmann@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de
49-622-148-6282
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 22-May-2013
UC Riverside announces science research grants related to immortality
Phenomena related to near-death experiences, immortality in virtual reality, and genes that prevent a species of freshwater hydra from aging are among the first research proposals funded by The Immortality Project at the University of California, Riverside.
John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Bettye Miller
bettye.miller@ucr.edu
951-827-7847
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Marine Mammal Science
Study reveals how fishing gear can cause slow death of whales
Using a "patient monitoring" device attached to a whale entangled in fishing gear, scientists showed for the first time how fishing lines changed a whale's diving and swimming behavior. The monitoring revealed how fishing gear hinders whales' ability to eat and migrate, depletes their energy as they drag gear for months or years, and can result in a slow death.

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 21-May-2013
U-M Water Center awards $570K in Great Lakes restoration grants
The new University of Michigan Water Center today awarded 12 research grants, totaling nearly $570,000, to support Great Lakes restoration and protection efforts.

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Abundance and distribution of Hawaiian coral species predicted by model
Researchers from the University of Hawaii, Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology developed species distribution models of the six dominant Hawaiian coral species around the main Hawaiian Islands, including two species currently under consideration as threatened or endangered.
National Marine Sanctuary Program, Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Unraveling the Napo's mystery
In the United States, rivers and their floodplains are well-documented and monitored. Ecuador's largest river, however, remains largely mysterious.
National Science Foundation, NASA, World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic Society

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Nature Geoscience
Amazon River exhales virtually all carbon taken up by rain forest
A study published this week in Nature Geoscience shows that woody plant matter is almost completely digested by bacteria living in the Amazon River, and that this tough stuff plays a major part in fueling the river's breath.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation, Research Council for the State of Sao Paolo

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Academy of Natural Sciences to guide coordinated region-wide watershed protection
The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University has received a major grant from the William Penn Foundation to support watershed protection and restoration in the Delaware watershed that is intended to coordinate and demonstrate a region-wide impact on improving water quality.
William Penn Foundation

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Geosphere
New GEOSPHERE science online covers Himalaya, Colorado River, McMurdo Sound, and more
New Geosphere postings online on 7 and 16 May include additions to two special issues: CRevolution 2: Origin and Evolution of the Colorado River System II and The ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf and Southern McMurdo Sound Drilling Projects. Other articles cover India-Asia collision; a Late Triassic snapshot in the US Southwest; the Alabama and western Georgia Blue Ridge; and the Jemez Mountains volcanic field.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 19-May-2013
Nature Geoscience
Scientists explore roots of future tropical rainfall
How will rainfall patterns across the tropical Indian and Pacific regions change in a future warming world? Climate models generally suggest that the tropics as a whole will get wetter, but the models don't always agree on where rainfall patterns will shift in particular regions within the tropics.

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 19-May-2013
Nature Geoscience
Sea level influenced tropical climate during the last ice age
The Indo-Pacific warm pool was much dryer during the last ice age than today, because lower sea level exposed the Sunda Shelf. The large landmass, in place of the warm ocean, altered the atmospheric circulation, shifting convection further west into the Indian Ocean. These findings by scientists at the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Woods Hole Institute of Oceanography, appear in the May 19, online edition of Nature Geoscience.
National Science Foundation, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Gisela Speidel
gspeidel@hawaii.edu
808-956-9252
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 19-May-2013
Shifts in global water systems -- markers of a new geological epoch: The Anthropocene
A suite of disquieting global phenomena have given rise to the "Anthropocene," a term coined for a new geologic epoch characterized by humanity's growing dominance of the Earth's environment and a planetary transformation as profound as the last epoch-defining event -- the retreat of the glaciers 11,500 years ago. In Germany May 21-24, experts will focus on how to mitigate key factors contributing to extreme damage to the global water system being caused while adapting to the new reality.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
Global Water System Project

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Wetlands
Front-row seats to climate change
Increasingly erratic rainfall patterns can lead to declines in southeastern frog and salamander populations, but protecting ponds can improve their plight.
US Geological Survey

Contact: hannah hamilton
hhamilton@usgs.gov
703-648-4356
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 17-May-2013
Satellite sees Tropical Storm Alvin's life end quickly
The first tropical storm of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season was short-lived. Satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Alvin became a remnant low pressure area 36 hours after it was named.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-May-2013
NASA sees Cyclone Mahasen hit Bangladesh
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM measured Cyclone Mahasen's rainfall rates from space as it made landfall on May 16. Mahasen has since dissipated over eastern India.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-May-2013
NASA sees Eastern Pacific get first tropical storm: Alvin
NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured imagery of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's first named tropical storm, Alvin.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-May-2013
NASA sees heavy rainfall as Cyclone Mahasen made landfall
NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall as Cyclone Mahasen made landfall today, May 16, in southern Bangladesh.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-May-2013
Science
Sea level: One-third of its rise comes from melting mountain glaciers
About 99 percent of the world's land ice is stored in the huge ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland, while only 1 percent is contained in glaciers. However, the meltwater of glaciers contributed almost as much to the rise in sea level in the period 2003 to 2009 as the two ice sheets: about one third. This is one of the results of an international study with the involvement of geographers from the University of Zurich.

Contact: Tobias Bolch
tobias.bolch@geo.uzh.ch
41-446-355-236
University of Zurich

Public Release: 15-May-2013
James Cameron to be publicly honored with Scripps Nierenberg Prize
Ocean frontier explorer and world-renowned filmmaker James Cameron has been named by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego as the recipient of the 2013 Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest. Also, Scripps's capacity to probe the deep sea has been considerably boosted with a key gift of technology from Cameron, who has donated an extreme-depth unmanned undersea exploration system known as a "lander" to Scripps for future deep-sea exploration endeavors.
The Nierenberg Family

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-May-2013
NASA sees first Eastern Pacific tropical depression to open season
The Hurricane Season of the Eastern Pacific Ocean officially begins today, May 15 and the first tropical depression of the season formed.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1262.

<< < 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 > >>


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