EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1226-1250 out of 1338.

<< < 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
Nature's glowing slime: Scientists peek into hidden sea worm's light
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues are unraveling the mechanisms behind a little-known marine worm that produces a dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of blue light released into seawater. Found around the world in muddy environments, from shallow bays to deeper canyons, the light produced by the "parchment tube worm" is secreted as a slimy bioluminescent mucus.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research's Natural Materials, Systems, and Extremophiles Program

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
The 66th Annual Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting
Stingray movement could inspire the next generation of submarines
Stingrays swim through water with such ease that researchers from the University at Buffalo and Harvard University are studying how their movements could be used to design more agile and fuel-efficient unmanned underwater vehicles.

Contact: Marcene Robinson
marcener@buffalo.edu
716-645-4595
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
NASA sees a re-awakening of ex-Depression 30W in a different ocean
The former tropical storm known as 30W that moved from the western North Pacific Ocean basin into the northern Indian Ocean appears to be ramping up for a short stint at depression status again.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
19th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP19)
Expert assessment: Ocean acidification may increase 170 percent this century
In a major new international report, experts conclude that the acidity of the world's ocean may increase by around 170 percent by the end of the century bringing significant economic losses. People who rely on the ocean's ecosystem services -- often in developing countries -- are especially vulnerable.

Contact: Sophie Hulme
sophie@communicationsinc.co.uk
44-797-371-2869
International Council for Science

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Grant supports Clemson study of coastal biodiversity
A grant from the National Science Foundation will support a Clemson University scientist's study of the impact of environmental changes on lucinids, a common species of clam found in Southern coastal marine sediments.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara Campbell
bcampb7@clemson.edu
864-656-0559
Clemson University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Amateur divers share species data for science
Species observations from thousands of scuba divers all over the world are now freely accessible via the Global Biodiversity Information Facility. The citizen science platform Diveboard has published over 15,000 records from the 'electronic log books' submitted by its community of nearly 100,000 registered divers. The dataset, available on the GBIF portal, includes records of species occurrences from dives in all the world's oceans, as well as many inland water bodies.

Contact: Sampreethi Aipanjiguly
saipanjiguly@gbif.org
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Freshwater Biology
Largest lake in Britain and Ireland has lost three-quarters of winter water birds
The largest lake in Britain and Ireland, Lough Neagh, has lost more than three-quarters of its overwintering water birds according to researchers at Queen's University Belfast.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Analytica Chimica Acta
New generation of micro sensors for monitoring ocean acidification
The first step in developing a cost-effective micro sensor for long-term monitoring of ocean acidification has been achieved by a team of scientists and engineers.

Contact: Catherine Beswick
catherine.beswick@noc.ac.uk
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK)

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Marine Policy
Don't hold the anchovies: Study shows Peruvian fish worth more as food than as feed
The true potential of Peruvian anchovy lies not in fishmeal but as food for people and as part of the ocean food web, according to Canadian and Peruvian researchers.

Contact: Villy Christensen
v.christensen@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-562-1151
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
NASA satellites track Typhoon Haiyan's second landfall and flood potential
NASA satellites provided data to meteorologists at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center who were updating forecasts for Tropical Storm Haiyan as it weakened from a typhoon and made a second landfall in northern Vietnam.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
NASA sees ex-Tropical Depression 30W trying to re-form in Indian Ocean
Tropical Depression 30W formed in the northwestern Pacific Ocean basin and crossed into the Northern Indian Ocean from Nov. 8 to Nov. 10.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
NASA satellites see Cyclone 03A make landfall in Somalia
Tropical Cyclone 03A made landfall in Somalia and moved inland where it is dissipating over eastern Ethiopia today, Nov. 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
Duke wins $15 million renewal to study nanotech safety
A pioneering, multi-institution research center headquartered at Duke's Pratt School of Engineering has just won a $15-million grant renewal from the National Science Foundation and the US Environmental Protection Agency to continue learning more about where nanoparticles accumulate, how they interact with other chemicals and how they affect the environment.
National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Minnie Glymph
minnie.glymph@duke.edu
919-660-8403
Duke University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Livermore researchers find tie between global precipitation and global warming
A new study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists shows that observed changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are directly affected by human activities and cannot be explained by natural variability alone.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Feast and famine on the abyssal plain
Marine biologists have long been puzzled by the fact that marine snow does not supply enough food to support all the animals and microbes living in deep-sea sediments. A new paper by MBARI researcher Ken Smith and his colleagues shows that blooms of algae or animals near the sea surface can deliver as much food to deep-sea organisms as would normally arrive over years or even decades.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 11-Nov-2013
Environmental Microbiology
Methane-munching microorganisms meddle with metals
A pair of microbes on the ocean floor "eats" methane in a unique way, and a new study provides insights into their surprising nutritional requirements. Learning how these methane-munching organisms make a living in these extreme environments could provide clues about how the deep-sea environment might change in a warming world.
Department of Energy, NASA Astrobiology Institute, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Super-typhoon Haiyan strike Philippines
Super-typhoon Haiyan, equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane on the US Saffir-Simpson scale, struck the central Philippines municipality of Guiuan at the southern tip of the province of Eastern Samar early Friday morning at 20:45 UTC (4:45 am local time).
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
NASA sees former Tropical Depression 30W entering Indian Ocean
Now a remnant low pressure area, former Tropical Depression 30W may get new another life in another ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
Animal Biotelemetry
Tracking young salmon's first moves in the ocean
Basic ocean conditions such as current directions and water temperature play a huge role in determining the behavior of young migrating salmon as they move from rivers and hit ocean waters for the first time, according to new research. How the fish fare during their first few weeks in the ocean has a profound impact on species' ability to survive into adulthood.
US Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Science
'Tiger stripes' underneath Antarctic glaciers slow the flow
Researchers at Princeton University and the British Antarctic Survey have discovered that most resistance to the movement of glaciers over the underlying bedrock comes from narrow, high-friction stripes that lie within large, extremely slippery areas underneath the glacier. These stripes are thought to govern the speed at which Antarctic glaciers are moving.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Zootaxa
The Carolina hammerhead, a new species of shark, debuts
University of South Carolina biologist Joe Quattro led a team that recently described a new species of hammerhead shark. His discovery is the result of years of study of the rivers and coastal waters of South Carolina.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A fish that pushes in the wrong direction solves a mystery of animal locomotion
For nearly 20 years, professor Eric Fortune has studied glass knifefish, a species of three-inch long electric fish that lives in the Amazon Basin. In his laboratory he tries to understand how their tiny brains control complex electrical behaviors.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
UNH, UC Davis launch network to study environmental microbes
A grant to the University of New Hampshire and the University of California, Davis, will help biologists identify an abundant yet largely unknown category of organisms, leading to better understanding of the vital environmental functions they play. The National Science Foundation awarded the universities $500,000 to develop a Research Coordination Network on eukaryotic biodiversity. The work will apply new genome sequencing technology to study and classify microscopic eukaryote species like nematodes, fungi, and single-celled animals.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
NASA satellites see Super-Typhoon Haiyan lashing the Philippines
Super-Typhoon Haiyan was lashing the central and southern Philippines on Nov. 7 bringing maximum sustained winds of a Category 5 hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Fisheries
Changes to fisheries legislation have removed habitat protection for most fish species in Canada
Federal government changes to Canada's fisheries legislation "have eviscerated" the ability to protect habitat for most of the country's fish species, scientists at the University of Calgary and Dalhousie University say in a new study.

Contact: Marie-Helene Thibeault
m.thibeault@ucalgary.ca
403-679-8447
University of Calgary

Showing releases 1226-1250 out of 1338.

<< < 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science