Press Releases

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Showing releases 1226-1250 out of 1741.

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Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Ocean Modeling Forum Pacific Herring Summit
Ocean Modeling Forum to bring human element to herring fishery, others
The Ocean Modeling Forum, a collaboration between the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries, is trying something very rare -- bringing together multiple science models and people who care about a particular ocean resource or fishery to decide what's most important for its vitality and the communities it serves. The group will kick off its second project June 8-10 in Richmond, British Columbia, with a summit focusing on the Pacific herring fishery.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Nature
A check on runaway lake drainage
Draining lakes unlikely to worsen Greenland's contribution to sea levels.
National Science Foundation and NASA

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Differences in metabolic rates of exploited and unexploited fish populations
Hessenauer and Vokoun, both of the Department of Natural Resources and the Environmnet at the University of Connecticut compared populations of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) taken from unexploited reference populations with those from inland recreational fisheries. Results suggest recreational angling may act as evolutionary force influencing metabolic rates.

Contact: Jan-Michael Hessenauer
jan-michael.hessenauer@uconn.edu
860-486-2808
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Satellite movie shows Andres weaken to a tropical storm
A NASA-generated animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from June 1 to 3 showed Hurricane Andres' eye disappear as the storm weakened into a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Nature
Sudden draining of glacial lakes explained
In 2008 scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of Washington documented for the first time how the icy bottoms of lakes atop the Greenland Ice Sheet can crack open suddenly -- draining the lakes completely within hours and sending torrents of water to the base of the ice sheet thousands of feet below. Now they have found a surprising mechanism that triggers the cracks.
National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs, National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryospheric Sciences Program

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Satellite sees Hurricane Blanca develop a pinhole eye
Tropical Storm Blanca strengthened into a hurricane while remaining almost stationary and about 400 miles west of the west coast of Mexico on June 3.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
ISME Journal
Protein identified in certain microalgae changes conversation about climate change
High-profile science behind climate change and carbon recycling takes a new turn as researchers find a protein in a major group of phytoplankton that keeps them alive in stressed environments in the ocean.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, NSF EAGER

Contact: Thania Benios
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Spotlight on marine litter
The current state of research and of research gaps concerning litter in our oceans is presented in the new open-access book 'Marine Anthropogenic Litter,' published by Springer. Estimates of the amount of litter in the world's oceans, its distribution, effects on humans and biota, and prevention strategies are just some of the topics addressed in the book. Experts from around the globe have contributed their knowledge to this book.

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Trouble in the tide pools
A harmful algal bloom is the suspected culprit of a die-off in 2011 of millions of purple sea urchins and six-starred sea stars in Northern California. Their disappearance is predicted to have long-term ecological consequences on their populations. As algal blooms are expected to increase with climate change and ocean acidification, similar mass mortality events are expected to increase.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kat Kerlin
kekerlin@ucdavis.edu
530-752-7704
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Frogs face virus risk in garden ponds
Pond owners are being urged not to use garden chemicals, or to release goldfish into ponds, because of the risk they could pose to wild frogs. Researchers from the University of Exeter found that the severity of ranavirosis, a devastating disease that kills thousands of frogs each year, increases in the presence of exotic fish. The use of garden chemicals was also associated with increased severity of the disease.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Pregnant pipefish fathers are not super dads
Few fathers experience pregnancy, but pipefish dads are one exception and it was assumed that they gave their young a head start in life by providing an abundant oxygen supply. However, it now turns out that this assumption is not true: they supply much less oxygen than thought, and when oxygen is scarce the fathers pay the price -- losing weight and condition -- for their young.
Fundaça?o para a Ciência e Tecnologia-Portugal, Fundo Social Europeu, Helge Ax:son Johnsons Stiftelse, Wilhelm och Martina Lundgrens Vetenskapsfond, Inez Johansson's Foundation, Royal Swedish Academy

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn@biologists.com
44-012-236-32871
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
How a box jellyfish catches fish
The first feeding study of tropical Australia's Irukandji box jellyfish has found that they actively fish. They attract larval fish by twitching their extended tentacles, highlighting their nematocyst clusters (stinging structures) and using them as lures. It's an impressive feat by any standards, but particularly so for an animal that doesn't have a defined brain.
Australian Lions Foundation

Contact: Linden Woodward
linden.woodward@jcu.edu.au
James Cook University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
MBARI researchers discover deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents in Pacific Ocean
In spring 2015, MBARI researchers discovered a large, previously unknown field of hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California, about 150 kilometers (100 miles) east of La Paz, Mexico. Lying more than 3,800 meters (12,500 feet) below the surface, the Pescadero Basin vents are the deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents ever observed in or around the Pacific Ocean.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
Satellite imagery shows a weaker Hurricane Andres
Infrared-light imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on June 2 shows a weaker Hurricane Andres.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Blanca's increasing winds, dropping temperatures
Cooling cloud top temperatures and increasing winds are two indications that a tropical cyclone is organizing and strengthening.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
Ecology
Great Barrier Reef marine reserves combat coral disease
A new and significant role for marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef has been revealed, with researchers finding the reserves reduce the prevalence of coral diseases. It's been known for some time that marine reserves are important for maintaining and enhancing fish stocks, but this is the first time marine reserves have been shown to enhance coral health on the Great Barrier Reef.
Australian Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Many endangered species are back -- but face new struggles
A study of marine mammals finds that several once endangered species, including the humpback whale, the northern elephant seal and green sea turtles, have recovered and are repopulating their former ranges. But returning species create a new challenge: some people interpret the return of these animals as a hostile invasion. The study presents strategies for 'lifting baselines' to help manage and celebrate recovering species.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Warmer climates may increase pesticides' toxicity in fish
In a study of the effects of increasing climate temperatures on the toxicity of three contaminants in different fish species, researchers found that all pesticides and industrial contaminants studied became toxic.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
NASA provides information on Category 4 Hurricane Andres
Hurricane Andres grew into a major hurricane today and NASA's Aqua satellite provided data to forecasters to help determine the powerful storm's next move.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
NASA sees birth of second Eastern Pacific tropical depression
Less than a week after the first Eastern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone was born, NASA's Aqua satellite saw Tropical Depression 02E form to the east of Hurricane Andres.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research
Ancient algae found deep in tropical glacier
Rice, Nebraska and Ohio State researchers looking for carbon in equatorial ice cores find diatoms, a type of algae. Their presence is evidence of what the landscape around the Andes in Peru might have been like more than a millennium ago.
Welch Foundation, Byrd Polar Research Center, Shared Equipment Authority at Rice, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
The ebb and flow of Greenland's glaciers
In northwestern Greenland, glaciers flow from the main ice sheet to the ocean in see-sawing seasonal patterns. The ice generally flows faster in the summer than in winter, and the ends of glaciers, jutting out into the ocean, also advance and retreat with the seasons. Now, a new analysis shows some important connections between these seasonal patterns, sea ice cover and longer-term trends.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hitchhiking to Caribbean coral
Recently-introduced algae in Caribbean offers short-term benefits but could have serious long-term negative effects. New evidence shows it likely arrived via cargo ships from the Pacific.
National Science Foundation, Canon Foundation, Pennsylvania State University, Florida International University, PADI Foundation

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Current Biology
Some endangered sawfishes are having babies, no sex required
Some female members of a critically endangered species of sawfish are reproducing in the wild without sex. The discovery, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 1, marks the first time living offspring from 'virgin births' have been found in a normally sexually reproducing vertebrate in the wild, the researchers say.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Invasive microbe protects corals from global warming, but at a cost
An invasive species of symbiotic micro-alga has spread across the Caribbean Sea, according to an international team of researchers. These single-cell algae, which live within the cells of coral animals, are improving the resilience of coral communities to heat stress caused by global warming, but also are diminishing the abilities of corals to build reefs.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Showing releases 1226-1250 out of 1741.

<< < 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>