Press Releases

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Showing releases 126-150 out of 1448.

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Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
UT research uncovers lakes, signs of life under Antarctica's dry valleys
Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change. Jill Mikucki, a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, microbiology assistant professor, was part of a team that detected extensive salty groundwater networks in Antarctica using a novel airborne electromagnetic mapping sensor system called SkyTEM.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lola Alapo
lalapo@utk.edu
865-974-3993
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Environmental Research Letters
Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate
Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming. It has been proposed that such disastrous climate effects could be offset by technological approaches. One such proposal is to artificially whiten the surface of the Arctic Ocean in order to increase the reflection of the sun's energy into space and restore sea ice.

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
650-704-7212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Biology Letters
Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows
Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities.

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
PeerJ
Endangered corals smothered by sponges on overfished Caribbean reefs
For reef-building corals, sponges do not make good neighbors. Aggressive competitors for space, sponges use toxins, mucus, shading, and smothering to kill adjacent coral colonies and then grow on their skeletons. A recent survey of coral reefs across the Caribbean shows that overfishing removes the predators of sponges, greatly increasing the threat of fast-growing sponges to an already diminished population of corals.

Contact: Joseph Pawlik
pawlikj@uncw.edu
910-962-2377
PeerJ

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Geoscience
How cracking explains underwater volcanoes and the Hawaiian bend
University of Sydney geoscientists have helped prove that some of the ocean's underwater volcanoes did not erupt from hot spots in the Earth's mantle but instead formed from cracks or fractures in the oceanic crust.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean bacteria get 'pumped up'
Scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and their Rutgers University colleague discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. They found that sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that have a steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles. The chemicals juice up the bacteria's metabolism causing them to more rapidly convert organic carbon in the particles back into CO2 before they can sink to the deep ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
ZooKeys
A new coral-inhabiting gall crab species discovered from Indonesia and Malaysia
Fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia by researcher Sancia van der Meij from Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands lead to the discovery of a new coral-dwelling gall crab. The new gall crab, named Lithoscaptus semperi, was discovered inhabiting free-living corals of the species Trachyphyllia geoffroyi on sandy bottoms near coral reefs. The study was published in the 500th issue of the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Sancia E.T. van der Meij
Sancia.vanderMeij@naturalis.nl
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Combining ecology and human needs, researchers assess sustainability of Baja fisheries
The waters of Baja California Sur are both ecosystems and fisheries where human needs meet nature. In a new study, researchers assessed the capacity to achieve sustainability by applying a framework that accounts for both ecological and human dimensions of environmental stewardship.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Brown University, Walton Family Foundation, World Wildlife Fund Fuller Fellowship Program

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Chemosphere
Diabetes drug found in freshwater is a potential cause of intersex fish
A medication commonly taken for type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish -- male fish that produce eggs, according to a study done at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Contact: Rebecca Klaper
rklaper@uwm.edu
414-382-1713
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems
A worldwide study of the interplay between organisms and their environment bolsters the idea that greater biodiversity helps maintain more stable and productive ecosystems.
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California -- Santa Barbara, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Zootaxa
NOAA, Tulane identify second possible specimen of 'pocket shark' ever found
An extraordinarily rare ocean discovery of an inches-long 'pocket shark' has been made. Sharks come in all shapes and sizes and are best known as a dominant predator in the marine food web. Understanding their movements, behaviors and anatomies gives fishery managers a better idea of their diets and relationships with other species.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Animal Biotelemetry
Many Dry Tortugas loggerheads actually Bahamas residents
Many loggerhead sea turtles that nest in Dry Tortugas National Park head to rich feeding sites in the Bahamas after nesting, a discovery that may help those working to protect this threatened species.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
International Journal on Life in Oceans and Coastal Waters
Genetics provides new clues about lionfish invasion
New genetic data suggest the red lionfish invasion in the Caribbean Basin and Western Atlantic started in multiple locations, not just one as previously believed, according to a new study led by the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-352-3487
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters
Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying to communicate over the sounds of ship traffic or other sources.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Are our fisheries laws working? Just ask about gag grouper
Gag grouper is the 37th stock to be rebuilt since 2000, according to the NOAA Fisheries' 2014 Status of Stocks report.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
How oil damages fish hearts: Five years of research since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Scientists have shown that toxic compounds in oil target the still-forming hearts of larval fish, leading to developmental defects and reduced survival.

Contact: Jennie Lyons
jennie.lyons@noaa.gov
301-427-8003
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Thawing permafrost feeds climate change
Assistant Professor of Oceanography Robert Spencer writes in Geophysical Research Letters that single-cell organisms called microbes are rapidly devouring the ancient carbon being released from thawing permafrost soil and ultimately releasing it back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Increased carbon dioxide levels, of course, cause the Earth to warm and accelerate thawing.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Science
Study: Photosynthesis has unique isotopic signature
Photosynthesis leaves behind a unique calling card, a chemical signature that is spelled out with stable oxygen isotopes, according to a new study in Science. The findings suggest isotopic signatures could exist for many biological and geological processes, including some that are difficult to observe with current tools.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Deep Carbon Observatory

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, Titan's atmosphere
This week from AGU: articles on undersea eruptions, shale boom and ozone pollution, and Titan's atmosphere.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
914-552-5759
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
DNA of bacteria crucial to ecosystem defies explanation
The genome of an important bacteria contains far more 'junk DNA' than scientists expected -- making its genome more closely resemble that of a higher lifeform.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
UNH researchers discover new method to detect most common bacteria contaminating oysters
In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and sickened consumers who ate the contaminated shellfish. The new patent-pending detection method - which is available for immediate use to identify contaminated shellfish -- is a significant advance in efforts to identify shellfish harboring disease-carrying strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, US Department of Agriculture, NH Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation EPSCoR

Contact: Lori Wright
lori.wright@unh.edu
603-862-1452
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil
A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. In May 2014, a group of recreational divers spotted an adult lionfish -- the voracious invader Pterois volitans -- in the rocky reefs of southeastern Brazil.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Majorities in Arctic nations favor cooperation with Russia despite Ukraine; conflict worries rise
Commissioned by the Gordon Foundation of Toronto and Institute of the North, Anchorage, a survey of 10,000 respondents in countries with Arctic territory reveals major differences of opinion on issues ranging from Arctic co-operation with Russia to the threat of military conflict north of the 60th parallel, to whether the Northwest Passage is a Canadian or international waterway. Tables of the survey results are here: http://bit.ly/1P5a8QI.
The Gordon Foundation / Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program, Institute of the North

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
The Gordon Foundation

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
American Antiquity
Calculating how the Pacific was settled
Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, a University of Utah anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Ecosphere
Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef
New research shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish populations of the Great Barrier Reef. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that removing predatory fish such as coral trout and snapper, through fishing, causes significant changes to the make-up of the reef's fish populations.
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1448.

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