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Showing releases 126-150 out of 1737.

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Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Northwest Atlantic Ocean may get warmer, sooner
A new study by NOAA researchers suggests future warming of ocean waters off the Northeastern US may be greater and occur at an even faster rate than previously projected. Their findings, based on output from four global climate models of varying ocean and atmospheric resolution, indicate that ocean temperature in the US Northeast Shelf is projected to warm twice as fast as previously projected and almost three times faster than the global average.
NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
CA's state fish can benefit from restoring and protecting streamside meadows
Rising temperatures can create stressful and possibly lethal stream habitat for native trout. To help understand the interactive effects of climate warming and livestock grazing on water temperature, researchers from the Pacific Southwest Research Station and University of California, Berkeley, conducted a six-year study documenting high elevation water temperatures in areas of the Golden Trout Wilderness.

Contact: Sherri Eng
sleng@fs.fed.us
510-883-8862
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Global Change Biology
Maximizing sea life's ability to reduce atmospheric carbon may help combat climate change
New research on West Antarctic seabed life reveals that the remote region of the South Orkney Islands is a carbon sink hotspot. The findings suggest that this recently designated (and world's first) entirely high seas marine protected area may be a powerful natural ally in combating rising CO2 as sea ice melts.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA analyzes winds and rainfall in unusual Atlantic system 90L
NASA's RapidScat instrument and Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite analyzed the surface winds and rainfall rates occurring System 90L, an unusual storm in the Northern Atlantic Ocean, which may become subtropical.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA sees Ula go extra-tropical
NOAA's GOES-West satellite and NASA's RapidScat instrument provided a look at Tropical Cyclone Ula after it became extra-tropical north of New Zealand.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
NASA analyzes Hurricane Pali's rainfall rates
Tropical storm Pali intensified late on Jan. 11 to become the earliest hurricane ever recorded in the Central Pacific Ocean. Warm ocean waters from El Nino supplied the extra energy needed for Pali to develop and prosper so early in the year. NASA's GPM core observatory got an inside look at the record-breaking hurricane while the Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible-light look at the storm from above.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
PLOS ONE
Climate change could cut First Nations fisheries' catch in half
First Nations fisheries' catch could decline by nearly 50 percent by 2050, according to a new study examining the threat of climate change to the food and economic security of indigenous communities along coastal British Columbia, Canada.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Harmful Algae
Ocean current in Gulf of Mexico linked to red tide
A new study found that a major ocean current in the Gulf of Mexico plays an important role in sustaining Florida red tide blooms. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team suggest that the position of the Loop Current can serve as an indicator of whether the algal bloom will be sustained, and provide warning of possible hazardous red tide conditions in coastal areas.
The Oceans and Human Health Center at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School, National Science Foundation grant, Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Clouds, like blankets, trap heat and are melting the Greenland Ice Sheet
The Greenland Ice Sheet is the second largest ice sheet in the world and it's melting rapidly, likely driving almost a third of global sea level rise. A new study shows clouds are playing a larger role in that process than scientists previously believed.

Contact: Tristan L'Ecuyer
tlecuyer@wisc.edu
608-890-2107
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
NASA and NOAA satellite data see North Atlantic system more concentrated
NASA and NOAA satellites continue to monitor the North Atlantic Ocean's non-tropical low pressure system for hints of development into a subtropical storm. NASA's Aqua satellite provided cloud top temperatures that show where strongest storms are within the larger system, and the storm appeared more consolidated on NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
New geological evidence aids tsunami hazard assessments from Alaska to Hawaii
New geological evidence aids tsunami hazard assessments from Alaska to Hawaii.

Contact: Lillian Steenblik Hwang
lhwang@agu.org
207-777-7318
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Tropical Cyclone Ula's winds, rainfall seen by NASA's GPM and RapidScat
A weaker Tropical Storm Ula continued to move through the Southern Pacific Ocean on Jan. 11 after peaking at major hurricane status. NASA's RapidScat instrument looked at Ula's winds, while the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission satellite measured rainfall in the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
NASA's Terra satellite spots record-breaking Hurricane Pali
Shortly after NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Pali it strengthened into a record-breaking hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Tough times for the tree of life on coral reefs
Marine scientists are calling for a re-think of how marine protected areas are planned and coordinated, following a global assessment of the conservation of tropical corals and fishes. Researchers from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have analyzed the extent to which the evolutionary histories of corals and fishes are protected, rather than looking at individual species.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
NASA eyeing an interesting weather system in northern Atlantic
A non-tropical low pressure system that has a possibility of developing subtropical characteristics has developed in the Northern Hemisphere tropics. During the week of Jan. 4, Tropical Storm Pali developed in the Northern Central Pacific Ocean. On Jan. 10 an area of low pressure developed in the Northern Atlantic Ocean, far to the east of Bermuda and NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at the system in infrared light.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
Journal of Fish Biology
Robotic vehicles offer a new tool in study of shark behavior
The dramatic video footage of a great white shark attacking the REMUS SharkCam autonomous underwater vehicle brought some of the highest ratings to Shark Week 2014 and went viral. While the footage was unprecedented, the scientific understanding enabled by the REMUS SharkCam is just as groundbreaking and represents the first successful efforts to autonomously track and image any animal in the marine environment.

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
Unusual Tropical Storm Pali still thriving far from Hawaii
Tropical Storm Pali, an out-of-season storm for the Central Pacific Ocean, continues to thrive about 8 degrees latitude north of the Equator. A recent infrared image from the GOES-West satellite showed that Pali a small cyclone.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ula's eye closing
NASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Ula's eye appeared to be 'closing' as clouds began filling it. Meanwhile New Caledonia remained on alert as the powerful storm continued moving away.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
BioScience
West Coast study emphasizes challenges faced by marine organisms exposed to global change
Along the West Coast, ocean acidification and hypoxia combine with other factors, such as rising ocean temperatures, to create serious challenges for marine life, a new study finds.
California Ocean Protection Council, California Ocean Science Trust, Oregon State University/Institute for Natural Resources, National Science Foundation

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
Nature Geoscience
Giant icebergs play key role in removing CO2 from the atmosphere
Giant icebergs are responsible for storing up to 20 percent of carbon in the Southern Ocean, a new study has found.

Contact: Amy Pullan
a.l.pullan@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-229-859
University of Sheffield

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
NASA sees stubborn Tropical Cyclone Ula kick up
Tropical Storm Ula strengthened over the night-time hours of Jan. 6 to 7 and NOAA's GOES-West satellite and NASA's RapidScat instrument provided a look at the stubborn storm that is expected to continue to intensify and curve south.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
NASA investigates Tropical Storm Pali's temperatures, winds
The Central Pacific Ocean's out-of-season tropical depression has strengthened into a tropical storm and has been renamed Pali. NASA's RapidScat instrument and Terra satellite gathered wind and temperature data on the unusual storm far to the southwest of Hawaii.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
Biological Reviews
The status quo on Europe's mussels
Mussels are the natural treatment plants of bodies of water and, therefore, just as important as bees. Unfortunately, they are equally threatened: most of the world's mussel stocks are in decline and some species face extinction. For this reason, scientists from 26 European countries have compiled the first comprehensive survey on the status quo of freshwater mussel species. TUM Professor Juergen Geist and two colleagues from Porto coordinated the project and can now provide recommendations for the future protection of the species.
Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, CONBI, COMPETE, 'ECO-IAS, Bavarian State Ministry of the Environment and Consumer

Contact: Prof. Jürgen Geist
geist@wzw.tum.de
0049-816-171-3767
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
Scientific Reports
Optimized Arctic observations for improving weather forecast in the northern sea route
The Northern Sea Route could be an attractive shipping route during Arctic ice-free periods; however, the decline in sea-ice extent could also cause severe weather phenomena, which could disturb ship navigation in turn. The sparse observational network over the Arctic Ocean makes weather and sea-ice forecasts less accurate and increases uncertainties. However, we show that the quality of weather and sea-ice forecasts can be improved by optimizing the Arctic-observing network.
KAKENHI, The Green Network of Excellence Program, The Arctic Challenge for Sustainability Project

Contact: Hiromi Obama
kofositu@nipr.ac.jp
81-425-120-655
Research Organization of Information and Systems

Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
Science
Authors of Science journal article strive to save world's mightiest rivers
A group of 40 international scientists led by a Texas A&M University System professor says three of the Earth's mightiest rivers are being ravaged in the name of progress.

Contact: Dr. Kirk Winemiller
k-winemiller@tamu.edu
979-862-4020
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1737.

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