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Showing releases 126-150 out of 1288.

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Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Marine Biology
A case study of manta rays and lagoons
Doug McCauley chose one of the most isolated places in the world, Palmyra Atoll, to study the ecology of the Manta alfredi.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tags reveal Chilean devil rays are among ocean's deepest divers
Thought to dwell mostly near the ocean's surface, Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) are most often seen gliding through shallow, warm waters. But a new study by scientists at WHOI and international colleagues reveals that these large and majestic creatures are actually among the deepest-diving ocean animals.
National Science Foundation, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Harrison Foundation, Portuguese Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
Scientists uncover the key to adaptation limits of ocean dwellers
The simpler a marine organism is structured, the better it is suited for survival during climate change. Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, discovered this in a new meta-study, which appears today in the research journal Global Change Biology.

Contact: Kristina Baer
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12139
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
New spawning reefs to boost native fish in St. Clair River
Construction of two new fish-spawning reefs is about to begin in the St. Clair River northeast of Detroit, the latest chapter in a decade-plus effort to restore native species such as lake sturgeon, walleye and lake whitefish.
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
Smarter than you think: Fish can remember where they were fed 12 days later
It is popularly believed that fish have a memory span of only 30 seconds. Canadian scientists, however, have demonstrated that this is far from true -- in fact, fish can remember context and associations up to 12 days later.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Geology
New study: Ancient Arctic sharks tolerated brackish water 50 million years ago
Sharks were a tolerant bunch some 50 million years ago, cruising an Arctic Ocean that contained about the same percentage of freshwater as Louisiana's Lake Ponchatrain does today, says a new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jaelyn Eberle
jaelyn.eberle@colorado.edu
303-919-6914
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
All the world's oceans have plastic debris on their surface
The Malaspina Expedition, led by the Spanish National Research Council, have demonstrated that there are five large accumulations of plastic debris in the open ocean that match with the five major twists of oceanic surface water circulation. In addition to the known accumulation of plastic waste in the North Pacific, there are similar accumulations in the central North Atlantic, the South Pacific, the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean.

Contact: Marta García Gonzalo
marta.garcia@csic.es
34-915-681-476
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
It's a girl! Gene silencing technology alters sex of prawns
Israeli scientists have developed a novel method for generating single-sex populations of prawns. This could be used to boost the productivity of aquaculture farms and even as a biocontrol measure against invasive species and pests.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Society for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting 2014
Climate change could stop fish finding their friends
Like humans, fish prefer to group with individuals with whom they are familiar, rather than strangers. This gives numerous benefits including higher growth and survival rates, greater defense against predators and faster social learning. However, high carbon dioxide levels, such as those anticipated by climate change models, may hinder the ability of fish to recognize one another and form groups with familiar individuals.

Contact: Caroline Wood
cwood4@sheffield.ac.uk
07-891-211-052
Society for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Marine bacteria are natural source of chemical fire retardants
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a widely distributed group of marine bacteria that produce compounds nearly identical to toxic man-made fire retardants.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Water samples teeming with information: Emerging techniques for environmental monitoring
Setting effective conservation policies requires near real-time knowledge of environmental conditions. Scientists with Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions propose using genetic techniques as a low-cost, quick way to collect such data.
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Stanford Woods Institute

Contact: Terry Nagel
tnagel@stanford.edu
650-498-0607
Stanford University

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice ages
Climate scientists have long tried to explain why ice-age cycles became longer and more intense some 900,000 years ago, switching from 41,000-year cycles to 100,000-year cycles.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
New report evaluates progress of comprehensive everglades restoration plan
Although planning for Everglades restoration projects has advanced considerably over the past two years, financial, procedural, and policy constraints have impeded project implementation, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council.

Contact: Lauren Rugani
news@nas.edu
202-334-2076
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Global Change Biology
Climate change and the ecology of fear
Climate change is predicted to have major impacts on the many species that call our rocky shorelines home. Indeed, species living in these intertidal habitats, which spend half their day exposed to air and the other half submerged by water, may be subjected to a double whammy as both air and water temperatures rise. Given the reliance of human society on nearshore coastal ecosystems, it is critical that we better understand how climate change will affect them.

Contact: Lori Lennon
l.lennon@neu.edu
617-680-5129
Northeastern University College of Science

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Extinct undersea volcanoes squashed under Earth's crust cause tsunami earthquakes, according to new research
New research has revealed the causes and warning signs of rare tsunami earthquakes.

Contact: Colin Smith
cd.smith@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46712
Imperial College London

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Scientific Reports
Research provides new theory on cause of ice age 2.6 million years ago
New research published today in the journal Nature Scientific Reports has provided a major new theory on the cause of the ice age that covered large parts of the Northern Hemisphere 2.6 million years ago.

Contact: Paul Teed
paul.teed@rhul.ac.uk
01-784-443-967
Royal Holloway, University of London

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Animals built reefs 550 million years ago, fossil study finds
It is a remarkable survivor of an ancient aquatic world -- now a new study sheds light on how one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed.
Natural Environment Research Council, University of Edinburgh, Laidlaw Trust

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
01-316-502-246
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pacing and intensity of ice ages
In a new study in Science, researchers find that the deep ocean currents that move heat around the globe stalled or even stopped about 950,000 years ago, possibly due to expanding ice cover in the north. The slowing currents increased carbon dioxide storage in the ocean, leaving less in the atmosphere, which kept temperatures cold and kicked the climate system into a new phase of colder but less frequent ice ages, they hypothesize.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists find the shocking truth about electric fish
Scientists have found how the electric fish evolved its jolt. Writing June 27, 2014, in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by Michael Sussman of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harold Zakon of the University of Texas at Austin and Manoj Samanta of the Systemix Institute in Redmond, Wash., identifies the regulatory molecules involved in the genetic and developmental pathways that electric fish have used to convert a simple muscle into an organ capable of generating a potent electrical field.
National Science Foundation, W. M. Keck Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Sussman
msussman@wisc.edu
608-262-8608
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Managing specialized microbes to clean stubborn chemicals from the environment
In a series of new studies, Anca Delgado, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines unique groups of microorganisms, capable of converting hazardous chlorinated chemicals like trichloroetheene into ethene, a benign end product of microbial biodegradation.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Wild Connection: What Animal Mating and Courtship Tell Us About Human Relationships
Sex-crazed turtles, confused bees, and cheating swans. These are just a few of the things animal behavior expert Dr. Jennifer Verdolin discusses in this new book that blends humor and science to show the similarities between humans and animals when it comes to dating and relationships.

Contact: Jennifer Verdolin
jverdolin@yahoo.com
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Changes in forage fish abundance alter Atlantic cod distribution, affect fishery success
A shift in the prey available to Atlantic cod in the Gulf of Maine that began nearly a decade ago contributed to the controversy that surrounded the 2011 assessment for this stock. A recent study of how this occurred may help fishery managers, scientists, and the industry understand and resolve apparent conflicts between assessment results and the experiences of the fishing industry.
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Invasive watersnakes introduced to California may pose risk to native species
Watersnakes, commonly seen in the lakes, rivers and streams of the eastern United States, are invading California waterways and may pose a threat to native and endangered species in the state, according to a University of California, Davis, study.

Contact: Jonathan Rose
jprose@ucdavis.edu
319-631-8292
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Are fish near extinction?
A new study from Tel Aviv University has uncovered the reason why 90 percent of fish larvae are biologically doomed to die mere days after hatching. This understanding of the mechanism that kills off the majority of the world's fish larvae may help find a solution to the looming fish crisis in the world.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Nature
Study links Greenland ice sheet collapse, sea level rise 400,000 years ago
A new study suggests that a warming period more than 400,000 years ago pushed the Greenland ice sheet past its stability threshold, resulting in a nearly complete deglaciation of southern Greenland and raising global sea levels some four to six meters.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anders Carlson
acarlson@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-3625
Oregon State University

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1288.

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