EurekAlert! - Marine Science Portal
  EurekAlert! Login | Main Page | Press Releases | Press Release Archive | Multimedia Gallery | Resources | Calendar | EurekAlert!
{TOPLEFTPHOTOALTTEXT}

Main Page
Press Releases
Multimedia Gallery
Resources
Calendar
EurekAlert! Home
EurekAlert! Login

 Search News Archive:
   
 Advanced Search
Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1320.

<< < 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Micropredators dictate occurrence of deadly amphibian disease
Researchers have made progress in understanding the distribution of the deadly amphibian chytrid pathogen. In some regions, the deadly impact of the pathogen appears to be hampered by small predators, naturally occurring in freshwater bodies. These micropredators may efficiently reduce the number of free-swimming infectious stages (zoospores) by consuming them. This natural behavior will reduce the infection pressure on potential amphibian hosts. These results were published in the Cell Press journal Current Biology.
Biodiversa Project RACE, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Curtin researchers to hide our splashes from sharks
Curtin University researchers will attempt to "mask" the noise of swimmers from sharks after receiving a grant from the State Government's Shark Hazard Mitigation Strategy. The project will first look at characterizing noises produced from swimming, surfing and kayaking that are detectable by a number of large shark species. Researchers will then compare shark behavior when the human noises are detectable to when they are masked, to see if masking typical swimmer noises can be effective at disrupting detection of humans.
Shark Hazard Mitigation Strategy

Contact: Megan Meates
megan.meates@curtin.edu.au
61-892-644-4241
Curtin University

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Nature Geoscience
Source of Galapagos eruptions is not where models place it
Images gathered by University of Oregon scientists using seismic waves penetrating to a depth of 300 kilometers have found an anomaly that likely is the volcanic mantle plume of the Galapagos Islands. It's not where geologists and computer modeling had assumed.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Frog fathers don't mind dropping off their tadpoles in cannibal-infested pools
Given a choice, male dyeing poison frogs snub empty pools in favor of ones in which their tiny tadpoles have to metamorphose into frogs in the company of larger, carnivorous ones of the same species. These are seemingly strange decisions, given how often cannibalism involving a large tadpole eating a smaller one takes place in natural pools, writes Bibiana Rojas of the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.
CIE at Deakin University

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
Current Biology
Micropredators dictate occurrence of deadly amphibian disease
Researchers have made progress in understanding the distribution of the deadly amphibian chytrid pathogen. In some regions, the deadly impact of the pathogen appears to be hampered by small predators, naturally occurring in freshwater bodies. These micropredators may efficiently reduce the number of free-swimming infectious stages (zoospores) by consuming them. This natural behavior will reduce the infection pressure on potential amphibian hosts and a goes a long way towards explaining the occurrence of chytridiomycosis.
Biodiversa Project RACE, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
Nature Geoscience
The water cycle amplifies abrupt climate change
During the abrupt cooling at the onset of the so-called Younger Dryas period 12680 years ago changes in the water cycle were the main drivers of widespread environmental change in western Europe. Thus, the regional impacts of future climate changes can be largely driven by hydrological changes, not only in the monsoonal areas of the world, but also in temperate areas.

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 19-Jan-2014
Aquatic Mammals
Keeping whales safe in sound
The International Union for the Conservation of Nature is intensifying global efforts to safeguard whales and other marine species from the harms of powerful noise used in seismic seafloor surveys by the oil and gas industry and others. The impetus is the newly-documented success of harm mitigation measures used in a study near critical whale feeding grounds around energy resource-rich Sakhalin Island, Russia, just north of Japan.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
International Union for the Conservation of Nature

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
TRMM satellite calculates System 91W's deadly Philippine flooding
People in the southern Philippines are used to heavy rainfall this time of the year, but rainfall totals have recently been exceptionally high.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Poison-breathing bacteria may be boon to industry, environment
Buried deep in the mud along the banks of a remote salt lake near Yosemite National Park are colonies of bacteria with an unusual property: they breathe a toxic metal to survive. Researchers from the University of Georgia discovered the bacteria on a recent field expedition to Mono Lake in California, and their experiments with this unusual organism show that it may one day become a useful tool for industry and environmental protection.

Contact: James Hollibaugh
aquadoc@uga.edu
706-542-7671
University of Georgia

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
New sea anemone species discovered in Antarctica
National Science Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, while using a camera-equipped robot to survey the area under Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf, unexpectedly discovered a new species of small sea anemones that were burrowed into the ice, their tentacles protruding into frigid water like flowers from a ceiling.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Nature McGinn
nmcginn@nsf.gov
703-292-8224
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
NASA tracks soggy System 94S over Western Australia
NASA's Terra satellite saw the System 94S, a tropical low, still holding together as it continued moving inland from the Northern Territory into Western Australia today, Jan. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
NASA satellite watches Southern Pacific birth Tropical Cyclone June
The tenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Pacific Ocean cyclone season was born today, January 17 as NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the storm as it became Tropical Storm June.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
NASA satellite catches birth of Tropical Cyclone Deliwe
The tropical depression southwest of Madagascar on January 16 developed into a tropical cyclone early on January 17 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured its birth.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
ZooKeys
A new toad from the 'warm valleys' of Peruvian Andes
A new species of toad was discovered hiding in the leaf litter of montane rain forest known as Peruvian Yungas ("warm valley" in translation). Like many other toads (family Bufonidae) inhabiting the forest floor, the new species Rhinella yunga has a cryptic body coloration resembling decaying leaves in the area, securing perfect camouflage but making morphological identification of species hard for scientists. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Jiří Moravec
jiri.moravec@nm.cz
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
NASA satellite imagery shows some punch left in System 94S
The tropical low pressure area known as System 94S still has some punch in it as the low-level center of circulation continues to track over Western Australia and the Northern Territory.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone 09S in Southern Indian Ocean
The ninth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season was born hours after NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and gathered important infrared data on the developing storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
NASA sees deadly System 91W still soaking Philippines
The tropical low pressure area known as System 91W that has been plaguing the central and southern Philippines for the last couple of days continues to bring floods and heavy rainfall today, January 16.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Ice-loving sea anemones discovered in Antarctica
Engineers using a camera-equipped robot to explore the waters beneath 250 meters of ice discover thousands of small sea anemones living on the underside of the ice.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Frank Rack
frack2@unl.edu
402-472-4785
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Ecohydrology
Streamflow alteration impacts fish diversity in local rivers
A US Geological Survey study quantifies change in fish diversity in response to streamflow alteration in the Tennessee River basin. The study highlights the importance of the timing, magnitude, and variability of low streamflows and the frequency and magnitude of high streamflows as key characteristics critical to assessing how fish communities change in response to streamflow alteration. This study was completed using fish community data collected by the Tennessee Valley Authority, and predictions of streamflow characteristics at more than 600 locations.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Christian Quintero
cquintero@usgs.gov
813-498-5019
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Scientific Reports
Sludge as new sentinel for human health risks
In a new study, a strong overlap is observed between chemicals found in biological samples taken from the human population and those detected in municipal biosolids. These findings suggest that analysis of sludge may provide a useful surrogate for the assessment of human exposure and bioaccumulation of potentially hazardous substances.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Nanotechnology
Carbon nanotube sponge shows improved water clean-up
A carbon nanotube sponge capable of soaking up water contaminants, such as fertilisers, pesticides and pharmaceuticals, more than three times more efficiently than previous efforts has been presented in a new study published today.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Current Biology
The life cycle of a jellyfish (and a way to control it)
Those free-swimming jellyfish in the sea don't start out in that familiar medusa form, but rather start as sessile and asexual polyps. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on January 16 have discovered what triggers that transformation in the moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita). The key is a novel metamorphosis hormone that accumulates during the cold winter to induce a synchronized emergence of jellyfish in the spring.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
NASA sees system 94S still trying to organize near Darwin
Tropical low pressure area System 94S continues to soak Australia's Northern Territory near Darwin.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Colin's final bow
Tropical Cyclone Colin is becoming an extra-tropical system in the Southern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the transitioning storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Acidification, predators pose double threat to oysters
The once-booming, now struggling Olympia oyster native to the West Coast could face a double threat from ocean acidification and invasive predators, according to new research from UC Davis' Bodega Marine Laboratory.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1320.

<< < 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 > >>


HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US    TOP
Copyright ©2014 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science