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Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1338.

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Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Tropical Cyclone 04B forms in northern Indian Ocean
The fourth tropical cyclone of the Northern Indian Ocean season formed and is headed for landfall in a couple of days in southeastern India.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
NASA begins first antarctic airborne campaign from McMurdo Station
NASA's Operation IceBridge has begun its 2013 Antarctic field campaign with the arrival of the agency's aircraft and scientists at the National Science Foundation's McMurdo Station in Antarctica.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
BMC Genetics
Genome scale view of great white shark uncovers unexpected and distinctive features
A new study by scientists from Nova Southeastern University's Save Our Seas Shark Research Centre and Cornell University published in final form today in the journal BMC Genomics now undertakes the first large-scale exploration of the great white shark's genetic repertoire, and comes up with unexpected findings.
Save our Seas Foundation

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Biogeosciences
Respiratory disorder in the ocean
For more than four months, from Nov. 2012 to March 2013, Kiel ocean scientists investigated on the German research vessel METEOR the oxygen-poor upwelling regions in the tropical Pacific off Peru. First results of the project carried out in the context of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 754 "Climate-biogeochemistry interactions in the tropical ocean" show how eddies in the ocean influence the oxygen and nutrient distribution in the oxygen-poor regions.

Contact: Andreas Villwock
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Underwater 'tree rings'
Almost 650 years of annual change in sea-ice cover can been seen in the calcite crust growth layers of seafloor algae, says a new study from the University of Toronto Mississauga.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Ecological Systems Technology

Contact: Nicolle Wahl
nicolle.wahl@utoronto.ca
905-569-4656
University of Toronto

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
Nature Geoscience
Oxygen, phosphorous and early life on Earth
Two billion years ago the Earth system was recovering from perhaps the single-most profound modification of its surface environments: the oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans. This led to a series of major changes in global biogeochemical cycles, as a team around Aivo Lepland of the Norwegian Geological Survey NGU reports in the latest online edition of "Nature Geoscience".

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Biosciences
Safety in numbers? Not so for corals
Traditionally, it was assumed that corals do not face a risk of extinction unless they become very rare or have a very restricted range. A team of scientists from the University of Hawaii and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has revealed that global changes in climate and ocean chemistry affect corals whether scare or abundant, and often it is the dominant, abundant corals with wide distributions that are affected the most.

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Nature Climate Change
Ocean acidification: Hard to digest
Ocean acidification impairs digestion in marine organisms, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. Researchers from Sweden and Germany have studied the larval stage of green sea urchins Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The results show that the animals have problems digesting food in acidified water.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
ZooKeys
The Gorgons of the eastern Pacific: scientists describe 2 new gorgonian soft coral species
Gorgonians are a type of soft corals easily distinguishable by the complex branching shape, which has also probably inspired their name, coming from the Gorgon Medusa -- a creature from the Greek mythology that had hair made of venomous snakes. The existence of Medusa outside myth might be debatable, but gorgonian corals do exist and scientists describe two new beautiful species in the open access journal Zookeys.

Contact: Odalisca Breedy
odaliscab@gmail.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
The 66th Annual Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting
A question for Jupiter
Based on what scientists understand about fluid dynamics, Jupiter's Great Red Spot should have disappeared centuries ago. Pedram Hassanzadeh, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, and Philip Marcus, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, think they can explain why. Their work, which Hassanzadeh will present at the annual meeting of the APS'S Division of Fluid Dynamics this November, also provides insight into persistent ocean eddies and vortices that contribute to star and planet formation.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Physical Society

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Latest storm updates NASA satellites see Cyclone 03A make landfall in Somalia Tropical Cyclone 03A
The remnants of what was once Tropical Storm Thirty over the Philippines have made there way into the Bay of Bengal after dropping heavy rainfall over Indochina.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Haiyan and Tropical Storm 30W bring heavy rains to the Phillipines
Haiyan, known locally in the Philippines as Yulonda, will go down as a historic storm, making landfall in the central Philippines as perhaps the most powerful tropical cyclone to ever make landfall with sustained winds estimated at 195 mph (~315 kph).
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
Nature's glowing slime: Scientists peek into hidden sea worm's light
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues are unraveling the mechanisms behind a little-known marine worm that produces a dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of blue light released into seawater. Found around the world in muddy environments, from shallow bays to deeper canyons, the light produced by the "parchment tube worm" is secreted as a slimy bioluminescent mucus.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research's Natural Materials, Systems, and Extremophiles Program

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
The 66th Annual Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting
Stingray movement could inspire the next generation of submarines
Stingrays swim through water with such ease that researchers from the University at Buffalo and Harvard University are studying how their movements could be used to design more agile and fuel-efficient unmanned underwater vehicles.

Contact: Marcene Robinson
marcener@buffalo.edu
716-645-4595
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
NASA sees a re-awakening of ex-Depression 30W in a different ocean
The former tropical storm known as 30W that moved from the western North Pacific Ocean basin into the northern Indian Ocean appears to be ramping up for a short stint at depression status again.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
19th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP19)
Expert assessment: Ocean acidification may increase 170 percent this century
In a major new international report, experts conclude that the acidity of the world's ocean may increase by around 170 percent by the end of the century bringing significant economic losses. People who rely on the ocean's ecosystem services -- often in developing countries -- are especially vulnerable.

Contact: Sophie Hulme
sophie@communicationsinc.co.uk
44-797-371-2869
International Council for Science

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Grant supports Clemson study of coastal biodiversity
A grant from the National Science Foundation will support a Clemson University scientist's study of the impact of environmental changes on lucinids, a common species of clam found in Southern coastal marine sediments.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara Campbell
bcampb7@clemson.edu
864-656-0559
Clemson University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Amateur divers share species data for science
Species observations from thousands of scuba divers all over the world are now freely accessible via the Global Biodiversity Information Facility. The citizen science platform Diveboard has published over 15,000 records from the 'electronic log books' submitted by its community of nearly 100,000 registered divers. The dataset, available on the GBIF portal, includes records of species occurrences from dives in all the world's oceans, as well as many inland water bodies.

Contact: Sampreethi Aipanjiguly
saipanjiguly@gbif.org
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Freshwater Biology
Largest lake in Britain and Ireland has lost three-quarters of winter water birds
The largest lake in Britain and Ireland, Lough Neagh, has lost more than three-quarters of its overwintering water birds according to researchers at Queen's University Belfast.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Analytica Chimica Acta
New generation of micro sensors for monitoring ocean acidification
The first step in developing a cost-effective micro sensor for long-term monitoring of ocean acidification has been achieved by a team of scientists and engineers.

Contact: Catherine Beswick
catherine.beswick@noc.ac.uk
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK)

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Marine Policy
Don't hold the anchovies: Study shows Peruvian fish worth more as food than as feed
The true potential of Peruvian anchovy lies not in fishmeal but as food for people and as part of the ocean food web, according to Canadian and Peruvian researchers.

Contact: Villy Christensen
v.christensen@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-562-1151
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
NASA satellites track Typhoon Haiyan's second landfall and flood potential
NASA satellites provided data to meteorologists at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center who were updating forecasts for Tropical Storm Haiyan as it weakened from a typhoon and made a second landfall in northern Vietnam.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
NASA sees ex-Tropical Depression 30W trying to re-form in Indian Ocean
Tropical Depression 30W formed in the northwestern Pacific Ocean basin and crossed into the Northern Indian Ocean from Nov. 8 to Nov. 10.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
NASA satellites see Cyclone 03A make landfall in Somalia
Tropical Cyclone 03A made landfall in Somalia and moved inland where it is dissipating over eastern Ethiopia today, Nov. 12.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
Duke wins $15 million renewal to study nanotech safety
A pioneering, multi-institution research center headquartered at Duke's Pratt School of Engineering has just won a $15-million grant renewal from the National Science Foundation and the US Environmental Protection Agency to continue learning more about where nanoparticles accumulate, how they interact with other chemicals and how they affect the environment.
National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Minnie Glymph
minnie.glymph@duke.edu
919-660-8403
Duke University

Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1338.

<< < 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>


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