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Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1320.

<< < 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 > >>

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite provides time series of powerful Tropical Cyclone Ian
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ian three days in a row and captured rainfall and thunderstorm cloud height data about the deadly storm as it strengthened and weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Coral reefs in Palau surprisingly resistant to naturally acidified waters
Ocean researchers working on the coral reefs of Palau in 2011 and 2012 made two unexpected discoveries that could provide insight into corals' resistance and resilience to ocean acidification, and aid in the creation of a plan to protect them.
National Science Foundation, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Ocean Life Institute, Nature Conservancy

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Crittercam captures crocodilian foraging behaviors
An animal-borne camera reveals that alligators may attempt to capture prey most often at night, even though the calculated probability of catching prey is highest in the morning.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-568-4532
PLOS

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
DNA detectives able to 'count' thousands of fish using as little as a glass of water
A mere glass full of water from Monterey Bay Aquarium's 1.2 million-gallon Open Sea tank, among the 10 largest aquariums in the world, is all scientists really needed to identify the Pacific Bluefin tuna, dolphinfish and most of the other 13,000 fish swimming there.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Ecology Letters
Key species of algae shows effects of climate change over time
A study of marine life in the temperate coastal waters of the northeast Pacific Ocean shows a reversal of competitive dominance among species of algae, suggesting that increased ocean acidification caused by global climate change is altering biodiversity.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, and others

Contact: Matt Wood
matthew.wood@uchospitals.edu
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Dolphin-power sufficient for propulsion without tricks
For 60 years the world has believed that dolphins did not have enough muscle to propel them at high speed and that they were resorting to some fluid-flow trickery to pull off their impressive performance. But Frank Fish from West Chester University, USA, never believed it and now he has proved that not only do dolphins have sufficient muscle power, but also they routinely produce ten times more power than the fittest human athletes.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Geology
Seafloor, sea-level, shear zones, subduction, sedimentation, and seismology
Geology adds 19 new articles online, covering locations in China, the Atacama Desert, the Himalaya, Kilauea volcano, Australia, the Mediterranean basin, the Gulf of California, the southern Andes, the Gulf of Cadiz, the northern Red Sea, and offshore Japan. Oceanography is an emphasis in many of the papers, and several articles incorporate modeling studies. Three articles in this collection are open access.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Science
Bacterial 'syringe' necessary for marine animal development
Bacterial biofilms serve a vital purpose, flagging suitable homes for some marine organisms and actually aiding the transformation of larvae to adults. A new study at the California Institute of Technology is the first to describe a mechanism for this phenomenon, providing one explanation for the relationship between bacterial biofilms and the metamorphosis of marine invertebrates. This information could provide key insights for the prevention of biofouling organism growth on the hulls of ships.
Office of Naval Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
mr@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Colin coming 'unwound'
Tropical Cyclone Colin is not as tightly wrapped as it was a day ago. Satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites show Colin is not as organized as it was.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
NASA sees rainfall from System 94S over Australia's Arnhem region
The low pressure area designated as System 94S has been trying to organize off the northern coast of Australia's Northern Territory for a couple of days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
NASA adds up Tropical Cyclone Colin's rainfall rates
Tropical Cyclone Colin continued moving through the Southern Indian Ocean on Jan. 13, and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission calculated the rates in which rain was falling throughout the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
NASA's infrared satellite imagery shows wind shear affecting Cyclone Ian
Tropical Cyclone Ian has been battered by wind shear and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that the bulk of the precipitation has been pushed east and southeast of the storm's center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Science
Marine tubeworms need nudge to transition from larvae state
Biofouling is the process by which barnacles, muscles, oysters, and tubeworms accumulate on the bottom of boats and other surfaces. Researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and Caltech have discovered a biological trigger behind the buildup. Biofouling begins when floating marine larvae come into contact with a biofilm formed by a microbe. Now researchers have isolated the genetic underpinnings of this novel form of bacterium-animal interaction.

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Science
Ahoy! First ocean vesicles spotted
Scientists discover extracellular vesicles produced by ocean microbes.

Contact: Denise Brehm
brehm@mit.edu
617-253-8069
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Science
Loss of large carnivores poses global conservation problem
In ecosystems around the world, the decline of large predators such as lions, dingoes, wolves, otters, and bears is changing the face of landscapes from the tropics to the Arctic -- but an analysis of 31 carnivore species published today in the journal Science shows for the first time how threats such as habitat loss, persecution by humans and loss of prey combine to create global hotspots of carnivore decline.

Contact: William Ripple
bill.ripple@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3056
Oregon State University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Radiocarbon dating suggests white sharks can live 70 years and longer
Adult white sharks may live far longer than previously thought, according to a new study that used radiocarbon dating to determine age estimates for white sharks, also known as great whites, in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. This first successful radiocarbon age estimate study analyzed vertebrae samples from eight white sharks; the oldest male was 73, the oldest female 40, suggesting previous studies have significantly underestimated longevity in sharks.
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
GPS traffic maps for leatherback turtles show hotspots to prevent accidental fishing deaths
Pacific leatherback turtles, among the most endangered animal populations in the world, often die hooked or tangled in industrial longlines that set thousands of hooks in the ocean to catch fish. In a new study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, researchers show the use-intensity distributions for 135 satellite-tracked adult turtles and distributions of longline fishing effort in the Pacific Ocean. The overlap of these distributions in space and time allows prediction of bycatch risk.
Lenfest Oceans Program, Pacific Pelagics Program

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Coral chemical warfare: Suppressing a competitor enhances susceptibility to a predator
Competition may have a high cost for at least one species of tropical seaweed. Researchers examining the chemical warfare taking place on Fijian coral reefs have found that one species of seaweed increases its production of noxious anti-coral compounds when placed into contact with reef-building corals, but at the same time becomes more attractive to herbivorous fish.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Emperor Penguins breeding on ice shelves
Antarctic emperor penguins may be adapting to warmer temperatures.

Contact: Paul Seagrove
psea@bas.ac.uk
44-122-322-1414
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Marine bacteria to fight tough infections
Aggressive infections are a growing health problem all over the world. The development of resistant bacteria is rampant and, in the United States, resistant staphylococci cause more deaths than AIDS on an annual basis. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are studying a new form of treatment based on marine bacteria. The results have been published in PLOS ONE.

Contact: Hanne Ingmer
hi@sund.ku.dk
45-22-15-95-18
University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Researchers unveil rich world of fish biofluorescence
A team led by scientists from the American Museum of Natural History has released the first report of widespread biofluorescence in fishes, identifying more than 180 species that glow in a wide range of colors and patterns. Published today in PLOS ONE, the research shows that biofluorescence -- a phenomenon by which organisms absorb light, transform it, and eject it as a different color -- is common and variable among marine fish species, indicating its potential use in communication and mating.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
New study finds extreme longevity in white sharks
Great white sharks -- top predators throughout the world's ocean -- grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
Nature
Elephant shark genome decoded
An international team of researchers has sequenced the genome of the elephant shark, a curious-looking fish with a snout that resembles the end of an elephant's trunk.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
PLOS ONE
Tracking the deep sea paths of tiger sharks
This release focuses on the importance of oceanic coral reefs for these important marine predators.

Contact: Helen Wright
helen.wright@griffith.edu.au
047-840-6565
Griffith University

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
Geology
Geological Society of America's top journal, Geology, begins 2014 with 10 new articles
New Geology postings extend the understanding of seawater chemistry by ~300 million years; determine erosion rates for exposure of today's southern Rocky Mountains; reveal new evidence for meltwater pulses; call mudstones "so complicated as to almost defy understanding"; describe a White Nile megalake; examine the oldest rocks on Earth; postulate that biomarkers heat up during earthquakes; investigate chemical denudation; describe plate tectonic influences on animal evolution; and analyze sulfides in abyssal peridotites.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1320.

<< < 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 > >>


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