Press Releases

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Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1737.

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Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
Octopus genome sequenced
The first whole genome analysis of an octopus reveals unique genomic features that likely played a role in the evolution of traits such as large complex nervous systems and adaptive camouflage. The findings are published in Nature on Aug. 12, 2015.
National Science Foundation, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health, the Molecular Genetics Unit of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Biology Letters
Color changing sand fleas flummox predatory birds
Sand fleas have a remarkable ability to change color in order to match dramatically different backgrounds, according to a new study from the University of Exeter and the Ascension Island Government Conservation Department.

Contact: Duncan Sandes
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22391
University of Exeter

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Octopus shows unique hunting, social and sexual behavior
When the larger Pacific striped octopus was first observed in the 1970s, its unusual social and mating behavior were so strange that no one would publish it. But UC Berkeley and California Academy of Sciences researchers found it all true. It is a gregarious, not solitary octopus that even briefly cohabits with its mate. It breeds and lays eggs for months, rather than once. And it stalks prey with a unique tap on the shoulder.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
PLOS ONE
Unique behaviors of larger Pacific striped octopus observed in captivity
Unique behaviors like beak-to-beak mating, den co-occupancy by a mating pair, extended spawning, and unique prey-capture were observed in captive larger Pacific striped octopus.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
NASA's Terra satellite sees Molave regain tropical storm status
Tropical Depression Molave showed a burst of thunderstorm development when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on Aug. 11, as it regained tropical storm status.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
NASA analyzes Typhoon Soudelor's rainfall
Typhoon Soudelor dropped over two feet of rainfall when it made landfall in China in early August, and soaked Taiwan. NASA estimated that rainfall using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
NASA's RapidScat sees Hurricane Hilda's strongest winds on northern side
The RapidScat instrument that flies aboard the International Space Station identified Hurricane Hilda's strongest winds on the northern side of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Melting glaciers feed Antarctic food chain
Nutrient-rich water from melting Antarctic glaciers nourishes the ocean food chain, creating feeding 'hot spots' in large gaps in the sea ice, according to a new study.

Contact: Leigh Cooper
lcooper@agu.org
202-777-7324
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Marine Ecology Progress Series
NSU researchers find more strategic culling needed to reduce lionfish invasion
Nova Southeastern University researchers find that current efforts to reduce lionfish populations aren't enough -- more must be done.

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Biological Invasions
Researchers develop fast test for invasive carp
Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Metroparks Zoo researchers have developed a field test that quickly determines whether Asian grass carp, a threat to the Great Lakes, are sterile or can reproduce. Ohio and neighboring states prohibit sale of fertile grass carp but they have been found in a river feeding into Lake Erie. Scientists worry that reproducing fish could destroy food supplies and habitat essential to native species in the Great Lakes.
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Metroparks

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Scientific Reports
Non-native marine species' spread, impact explained by time since introduction
The time since the introduction of a non-native marine species best explains its global range, according to new research by an international team of scientists led by University of Georgia ecologist James E. Byers. The study, published in the open access journal Nature Scientific Reports, also contains a warning: The vast majority of marine invaders have not yet finished spreading.
Macquarie University, University of New South Wales, National Science Foundation, New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries and National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, National Sea Grant Program, Smithsonian Institution

Contact: James E. Byers
jebyers@uga.edu
706-583-0012
University of Georgia

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Geology
New digital seafloor map provides answers and more questions
Ocean sediments cover 70 percent of our planet's surface, forming the substrate for the largest ecosystem on Earth and its largest carbon reservoir -- but the most recent map of seafloor geology was drawn by hand more than 40 years ago. Now Adriana Dutkiewicz and her colleagues from the University of Sydney have carefully analyzed and categorized 15,000 seafloor sediment samples to reveal that deep ocean basins are much more complex than previously thought.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
NASA sees Tropical Depression Molave spinning down
NASA's Terra satellite and the RapidScat instrument both captured data on Tropical Depression Molave as it was spinning down in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Scientists pioneer method to track water flowing through glaciers
Researchers for the first time have used seismic sensors to track meltwater flowing through glaciers and into the ocean, a critical step to understanding glaciers as climate changes. Meltwater moving through a glacier can increase melting and destabilize the glacier. It can speed the glacier's flow downhill. It can move boulders and other sediments toward the terminus of the glacier. And it can churn warm ocean water and bring it in contact with the glacier.
National Science Foundation, University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, NASA, US Geological Survey, US Department of Interior

Contact: Anton Caputo
anton.caputo@jsg.utexas.edu
210-602-2085
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Mussels inspire development of waterproof adhesives
Nature provides spectacular examples of adhesives that work extraordinarily well in wet and harsh conditions. Mussels stick to boats and rocks by secretion of protein-based adhesives that demonstrate adhesion even in the harsh marine environment. Inspired by these marine creatures, Dr. Abraham Joy and Dr. Ali Dhinojwala and their teams at The University of Akron have developed a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesives using soybean oil as a starting material, which is a renewable resource.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lisa Craig
lmc91@uakron.edu
330-972-7429
University of Akron

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
NASA stares Hurricane Hilda in the eye
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Hilda and captured an image that clearly showed the storm's eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Newly identified tadpole disease found across the globe
Scientists have found that a newly identified and highly infectious tadpole disease is found in a diverse range of frog populations across the world. The discovery sheds new light on some of the threats facing fragile frog populations, which are in decline worldwide.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
44-776-851-1866
University of Exeter

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Nature Climate Change
Volcanic vents preview future ocean habitats
A world-first underwater study of fish in their natural environment by University of Adelaide marine ecologists has shown how predicted ocean acidification from climate change will devastate temperate marine habitats and biodiversity.

Contact: Ivan Nagelkerken
ivan.nagelkerken@adelaide.edu.au
61-477-320-551
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 9-Aug-2015
Geology
Big data maps world's ocean floor
Scientists from the University of Sydney's School of Geosciences have led the creation of the world's first digital map of the seafloor's geology.
Science and Industry Endowment Fund

Contact: Jocelyn Prasad
jocelyn.prasad@sydney.edu.au
043-460-5018
University of Sydney

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Biology Letters
Land animals proliferate faster than aquatic counterparts
New analyses of vertebrate groups performed by UA evolutionary biologist John Wiens suggest that land animals proliferate more rapidly than their aquatic counterparts. The findings may help explain biodiversity patterns throughout the animal kingdom.

Contact: La Monica Everett-Haynes
leverett@email.arizona.edu
University of Arizona

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Shining a Light on Fish at Night
Shining a light on fish at night
Ahhh... a moonlight swim. The ocean at night can be enjoyed along with unseen inhabitants brushing up against you or nipping your toe, and topped off with that mesmerizing bioluminescent glow. But, have you ever wondered what is happening beneath the surface at night? At the 2015 Fish at Night Symposium, scientists will be shining a light on the activities of fishes and other ocean inhabitants at night.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Science
UGA researcher calls for more natural baseline data collection in world's oceans
According to University of Georgia's Samantha Joye, one of the biggest challenges in evaluating the environmental impacts of the Macondo blowout was the lack of baseline data -- both in the water column and along the seabed. As oil and natural gas drilling continues at depths well beyond that of where the Macondo wellhead blew out, Joye argues in the journal Science that environmental monitoring data is desperately needed to establish natural baselines.

Contact: Emily Davenport
davene@uga.edu
706-542-5893
University of Georgia

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Coral Reefs
Fish go deep to beat the heat
A James Cook University study shows fish retreating to deeper water to escape the heat, a finding that throws light on what to expect if predictions of ocean warming come to pass.

Contact: Alistair Bone
alistair.bone@jcu.edu.au
61-747-814-942
James Cook University

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Science
Science journal letter highlights salmon vulnerability
Simon Fraser University scientist Jonathan Moore has authored new research suggesting that a proposed controversial terminal to load fossil fuels in the Skeena River estuary has more far-reaching risks than previously recognized. In a letter newly published in the journal Science Moore and First Nations leaders and fisheries biologists from throughout the Skeena watershed refer to the new data, which is on the Moore Lab site.
Liber Ero Chair of Coastal Science and Management

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Satellite sees formation of Eastern Pacific's Tropical Storm Hilda
The GOES-West satellite captured images of Tropical Storm Hilda as it developed early on Aug. 6.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1737.

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