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Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1312.

<< < 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 > >>

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Micro-gels from tiny ice algae play an important role in polar ocean carbon budgets
Secretion of polysaccharides from the micro community living within the sea ice stick organism together and forms greater particles introducing a rapid transport of carbon to the seafloor. New research now makes it possible to forecast the importance for the global carbon budget of this transport.

Contact: David Thomas
david.thomas@biology.au.dk
45-29-65-31-17
Aarhus University

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Diversity and Distributions
Life found in the sediments of an Antarctic subglacial lake for the first time
Evidence of diverse life forms dating back nearly a hundred thousand years has been found in subglacial lake sediments by a group of British scientists. The possibility that extreme life forms might exist in the cold and dark lakes hidden kilometers beneath the Antarctic ice sheet has fascinated scientists for decades.

Contact: Paul B Holland
paul.b.holland@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21226
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
Breaking deep-sea waves reveal mechanism for global ocean mixing
Oceanographers for the first time recorded an enormous wave breaking miles below the surface in a key bottleneck for global ocean circulation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
Geology
Rainfall in South Pacific was more variable before 20th century
A new reconstruction of climate in the South Pacific during the past 446 years shows rainfall varied much more dramatically before the start of the 20th century than after. The finding, based on an analysis of a cave formation called a stalagmite from the island nation of Vanuatu, could force climate modelers to adjust their models.
National Science Foundation, Taiwan National Science Council

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@jsg.utexas.edu
512-471-2241
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
NASA investigates Gabrielle's remnants and new Tropical Storm Humberto
Tropical Depression Nine formed yesterday, Sept. 8 in the far eastern Atlantic, and NASA's Aqua satellite saw it strengthen into Tropical Storm Humberto today, Sept. 9 at 5 a.m. EDT.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Sep-2013
Nature Climate Change
Climate change will upset vital ocean chemical cycles
New research from the University of East Anglia shows that rising ocean temperatures will upset natural cycles of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorous. Plankton plays an important role in the ocean's carbon cycle by removing half of all CO2 from the atmosphere during photosynthesis and storing it deep under the sea. Findings published today in Nature Climate Change reveal that water temperature has a direct impact on maintaining the delicate plankton ecosystem of our oceans.

Contact: Lisa Horton
press@uea.ac.uk
01-603-593-496
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
Satellite sees Atlantic Tropical Depression 8 form in southwestern Gulf of Mexico
The eighth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico at 2 p.m. EDT on Sept. 6, and NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
NASA satellites and HS3 Mission cover Tropical Storm Gabrielle's demise, watch other areas
Two NASA satellites and one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft got good looks at Gabrielle when it weakened from a tropical storm to a depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
NASA sees Tropical Storm Lorena bringing heavy rains to Mexico's west coast
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM passed over Tropical Storm Lorena from its orbit in space on Friday, Sept. 6 and measured the rate in which rain is falling from the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Ecology
UF: Newly discovered tiger shark migration pattern might explain attacks near Hawaii
The migration of mature female tiger sharks during late summer and fall to the main Hawaiian Islands, presumably to give birth, could provide insight into attacks in that area, according to a University of Florida scientist.
Monterey Bay Aquarium, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Yannis Papastamatiou
ypapastamatiou@gmail.com
352-392-2360
University of Florida

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Sept. 5, 2013 update 2 -- satellite data shows a very active tropical Atlantic, Gabrielle weakens
Tropical Storm Gabrielle has weakened to a depression by 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 5, while three other low pressure areas struggle to develop in the Northern Atlantic Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Nature Geoscience
Scientists confirm existence of largest single volcano on earth
A University of Houston professor led a team of scientists to uncover the largest single volcano yet documented on Earth. Covering an area roughly equivalent to the British Isles or the state of New Mexico, this volcano, dubbed the Tamu Massif, is nearly as big as the giant volcanoes of Mars, placing it among the largest in the Solar System.
National Science Foundation, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal
Deep-ocean carbon sinks
Although microbes that live in the so-called "dark ocean"-- below a depth of some 600 feet where light doesn't penetrate-- may not absorb enough carbon to curtail global warming, they do absorb considerable amounts of carbon and merit further study, according to a University of Iowa study.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Ecology
Female tiger sharks migrate from Northwestern to Main Hawaiian Islands during fall pupping season
A quarter of the mature female tiger sharks plying the waters around the remote coral atolls of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands decamp for the populated Main Hawaiian Islands in the late summer and fall, swimming as far as 2,500 kilometers (1,500 miles) according to new research from University of Florida and the University of Hawaii.
Monterey Bay Aquarium, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Journal of Experimental Biology
Is that a testes or an iridescent stripe? A female squid's male-like true colors
Male squid are aggressive towards their female counterparts, so anything to make the female look more like a male would be an advantage for her. DeMartini from the University of California Santa Barbara, USA, characterise, for the first time, a female-only bright white strip and its surrounding iridescent stripes. The team find they are inducible and may, to a squid's eye at least, look like the male testes and spare the female aggressive behavior.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Officer

Contact: Nicola Stead
nicola.stead@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
NASA satellite animation records birth of Tropical Storm Gabrielle near Puerto Rico
One hour before midnight Eastern Daylight Time on Sept. 4, Tropical Depression 7 strengthened into Tropical Storm Gabrielle just 70 miles south of Ponce, Puerto Rico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
NASA sees 'hot towers' in newborn Tropical Depression 12e hinting at intensification
Tropical Depression 12E formed off the southwestern coast of Mexico at 5 a.m. EDT on Sept. 5. Just 40 minutes before, NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Report reveals missed opportunities to save water and energy
Water managers are missing substantial opportunities to save energy and money, according to a report by Water in the West. The study also identifies significant gaps in knowledge about the amount of water used to extract energy and to generate electricity. It is a comprehensive survey of publications between 1990 and 2013 that analyzes policy, along with scientific and technical research, on the connections between water and energy.
S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation

Contact: Janny Choy
jmchoy@stanford.edu
650-724-4178
Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Letters in Applied Microbiology
Risk to consumers from fungal toxins in shellfish should be monitored
To protect consumers, screening shellfish for fungal toxins is important, say scientists.

Contact: Nancy Mendoza
nancy@sfam.org.uk
44-079-202-64596
Wiley

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Current Biology
Clues in coral bleaching mystery
Coral reefs are tremendously important for ocean biodiversity. Unfortunately they have been in great decline in recent years, much of it due to the effects of global climate change. One such effect, called bleaching, occurs when the symbiotic algae that are essential for providing nutrients to the coral either lose their identifying photosynthetic pigmentation and their ability to perform photosynthesis or disappear entirely from the coral's tissue. Without a healthy population of these algae, the coral cannot survive.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Arthur Grossman
agrossman@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x212
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Global Change Biology
Wetlands could be key in revitalizing acid streams, UT Arlington researchers say
A team of Texas biologists working with stream samples from the Adirondack Forest Preserve in New York says watershed wetlands can serve as a natural source for the improvement of streams in the Adirondacks that have been polluted by acid rain. The University of Texas at Arlington researchers hope their work highlights a viable alternative to liming.
Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Infrared NASA image sees Extra-Tropical Toraji over Japan
Tropical Storm Toraji passed over Kyushu and transitioned into an extra-tropical storm while bringing heavy rainfall over the big island of Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Sept. 4.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Geophysical Research Letters
West Antarctica ice sheet existed 20 million years earlier than previously thought
The results of research conducted by professors at UC Santa Barbara and colleagues mark the beginning of a new paradigm for our understanding of the history of Earth's great global ice sheets. The research shows that, contrary to the popularly held scientific view, an ice sheet on West Antarctica existed 20 million years earlier than previously thought.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
IRB and PharmaMar invent a method to reproduce marine substances of pharmacological interest
This advance opens the door to copying and improving 38 natural molecules derived from marine sponges that are very promising for the treatment of various diseases.

Contact: Sònia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
From birth to death in 4 days: Kiko now a remnant low
A lot of things happen over a holiday weekend, and while people in the United States were celebrating Labor Day weekend, the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Kiko came and went.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1312.

<< < 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 > >>


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