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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1338.

<< < 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>

Public Release: 11-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Livermore researchers find tie between global precipitation and global warming
A new study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists shows that observed changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are directly affected by human activities and cannot be explained by natural variability alone.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Feast and famine on the abyssal plain
Marine biologists have long been puzzled by the fact that marine snow does not supply enough food to support all the animals and microbes living in deep-sea sediments. A new paper by MBARI researcher Ken Smith and his colleagues shows that blooms of algae or animals near the sea surface can deliver as much food to deep-sea organisms as would normally arrive over years or even decades.
National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 11-Nov-2013
Environmental Microbiology
Methane-munching microorganisms meddle with metals
A pair of microbes on the ocean floor "eats" methane in a unique way, and a new study provides insights into their surprising nutritional requirements. Learning how these methane-munching organisms make a living in these extreme environments could provide clues about how the deep-sea environment might change in a warming world.
Department of Energy, NASA Astrobiology Institute, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Super-typhoon Haiyan strike Philippines
Super-typhoon Haiyan, equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane on the US Saffir-Simpson scale, struck the central Philippines municipality of Guiuan at the southern tip of the province of Eastern Samar early Friday morning at 20:45 UTC (4:45 am local time).
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
NASA sees former Tropical Depression 30W entering Indian Ocean
Now a remnant low pressure area, former Tropical Depression 30W may get new another life in another ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
Animal Biotelemetry
Tracking young salmon's first moves in the ocean
Basic ocean conditions such as current directions and water temperature play a huge role in determining the behavior of young migrating salmon as they move from rivers and hit ocean waters for the first time, according to new research. How the fish fare during their first few weeks in the ocean has a profound impact on species' ability to survive into adulthood.
US Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Science
'Tiger stripes' underneath Antarctic glaciers slow the flow
Researchers at Princeton University and the British Antarctic Survey have discovered that most resistance to the movement of glaciers over the underlying bedrock comes from narrow, high-friction stripes that lie within large, extremely slippery areas underneath the glacier. These stripes are thought to govern the speed at which Antarctic glaciers are moving.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Zootaxa
The Carolina hammerhead, a new species of shark, debuts
University of South Carolina biologist Joe Quattro led a team that recently described a new species of hammerhead shark. His discovery is the result of years of study of the rivers and coastal waters of South Carolina.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A fish that pushes in the wrong direction solves a mystery of animal locomotion
For nearly 20 years, professor Eric Fortune has studied glass knifefish, a species of three-inch long electric fish that lives in the Amazon Basin. In his laboratory he tries to understand how their tiny brains control complex electrical behaviors.

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
UNH, UC Davis launch network to study environmental microbes
A grant to the University of New Hampshire and the University of California, Davis, will help biologists identify an abundant yet largely unknown category of organisms, leading to better understanding of the vital environmental functions they play. The National Science Foundation awarded the universities $500,000 to develop a Research Coordination Network on eukaryotic biodiversity. The work will apply new genome sequencing technology to study and classify microscopic eukaryote species like nematodes, fungi, and single-celled animals.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
NASA satellites see Super-Typhoon Haiyan lashing the Philippines
Super-Typhoon Haiyan was lashing the central and southern Philippines on Nov. 7 bringing maximum sustained winds of a Category 5 hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Fisheries
Changes to fisheries legislation have removed habitat protection for most fish species in Canada
Federal government changes to Canada's fisheries legislation "have eviscerated" the ability to protect habitat for most of the country's fish species, scientists at the University of Calgary and Dalhousie University say in a new study.

Contact: Marie-Helene Thibeault
m.thibeault@ucalgary.ca
403-679-8447
University of Calgary

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Science
Researchers advocate for climate adaptation science
An international team of researchers says in a new paper that climate science needs to advance to a new realm -- more practical applications for dealing with the myriad impacts of climate variability.

Contact: Phil Mote
pmote@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-5694
Oregon State University

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Network to study environmental microbes
They're tiny, everywhere and vital to the environment, but biologists have largely overlooked the worms, fungi and single-celled animals found in every environment on Earth. A new research coordination network based at UC Davis and the University of New Hampshire aims to correct that, applying new genome sequencing technology to study these organisms.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
NASA sees Tropical Depression 30W stretching out, fading
Tropical Storm 30W weakened into a tropical depression again on Nov. 6 and wind shear stretched out the storm. The storm's elongation was evident in infrared NASA satellite imagery.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
NASA sees heavy rain around Super-Typhoon Haiyan's eye
Super Typhoon Haiyan continues moving toward the Philippines, and when NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead, it was very close to the island of Palau and packing heavy rainfall. Haiyan is now equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Environmental Science and Technology
Clean Air Act has led to improved water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed
A new study shows that the reduction of pollution emissions from power plants in the mid-Atlantic is making an impact on the quality of the water that ends up in the Chesapeake Bay.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Maintaining strength in ocean science requires greater collaboration, coordination, and integration
A newly released report by the Council of Canadian Academies entitled, Ocean Science in Canada: Meeting the Challenge, Seizing the Opportunity, provides an overview of Canada's research capacity in ocean science, analyzes research output and impact, and describes opportunities and challenges for ocean science in Canada in light of emerging and future areas of importance for the ocean science community.

Contact: Cathleen Meechan
cathleen.meechan@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x228
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
PLOS ONE
Drilling for hydrocarbons can impact aquatic life
The degradation of drilling sumps associated with hydrocarbon extraction can negatively affect aquatic ecosystems.

Contact: Kallie Huss
onepress@plos.org
415-568-3162
PLOS

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
PLOS ONE
Stress makes snails forgetful
New research on pond snails has revealed that high levels of stress can block memory processes. Researchers from the University of Exeter and the University of Calgary trained snails and found that when they were exposed to multiple stressful events they were unable remember what they had learned.
Alberta Innovates -- Health Solutions and Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Jo Bowler
j.bowler@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
NASA investigates Typhoon Haiyan's intense rainfall
As Typhoon Haiyan has been strengthening, NASA's TRMM satellite investigated how much rain was falling throughout the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
NASA sees warm sea surface helped strengthen Tropical Storm 30W
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and revealed that warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear enabled Tropical Depression 30W to strengthen into a tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
Frontiers
Frontiers launches 2 new open-access journals: Frontiers in Earth Science and Frontiers in Environmental Science
Frontiers launches two new open-access journals: Frontiers in Earth Science and Frontiers in Environmental Science.

Contact: Katerina Michalakakou
katerina.michalakakou@frontiersin.org
41-021-510-1712
Frontiers

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
Looking for tomorrow's power source? Go fly a (underwater) kite
As the world looks to wean itself from fossil fuels, a new answer may be emerging: underwater kites. A professor of mechanical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to explore ways to harness ocean currents and tidal flows using this unexpected technology. The payoff could be significant. For example, the potential power output of just the Florida Current could be equivalent to 10 nuclear power plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Dorsey
mwdorsey@wpi.edu
508-831-5609
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
Journal of Physical Oceanography
VC predicts the motion of the ocean
The Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University has just published research that will help you every morning with the surf report.

Contact: ANU Media Hotline
media@anu.edu.au
61-026-125-7979
Australian National University

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1338.

<< < 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>


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